Follow Us

RSS Feed    Follow on Twitter    Follow on Facebook    YouTube Channel    Vimeo Channel    Tumblr    SoundCloud Channel    iPhone App    iPhone App

Steven Heydemann, Fred Lawson, David Lesch, and Patrick Seale

Contributors

Roundtable on Syria Today (Part 3): Is Syria Different?

[Image from fourwinds10.com]

This is the last installment (Part 3) of the first Jadaliyya Roundtable on Syria, moderated by Bassam Haddad and Joshua Landis, of Syria Comment. It features Steven Heydemann, Fred Lawson, David Lesch, and Patrick Seale. This post will be published on both Jadaliyya and Syria Comment. [See Part 1 here, and Part 2 here.]  Per the original announcement in Part 1, we are still awaiting responses from a number of writers from inside Syria who have understandably ...

Keep Reading »

Roundtable on Syria Today (Part 2): On Portrayal

[Image from Getty Images]

This is Part 2 of our first Jadaliyya Roundtable on Syria, moderated by Bassam Haddad and Joshua Landis, of Syria Comment. It features Steven Heydemann, Fred Lawson, David Lesch, and Patrick Seale. This post will be published on both Jadaliyya and Syria Comment. [See Part 1 here and Part 3 here.]     Roundtable Question #2   2. What do you consider to be missing or exaggerated in the discussion/writings/policy on the Syrian ...

Keep Reading »

Roundtable on Syria Today (Part 1)

[

This is Part 1 of the first Jadaliyya Roundtable on Syria, moderated by Bassam Haddad and Joshua Landis, of Syria Comment. It features Steven Heydemann, Fred Lawson, David Lesch, and Patrick Seale. This post will be published on both Jadaliyya and Syria Comment. [See Part 1 here, Part 2 here, and Part 3 here].   After two weeks of protests in Syria, many still wonder where matters are headed. The Syrian regime is firm in its stance, and so are the ...

Keep Reading »

Bio

Steven Heydemann, Fred Lawson, David Lesch, and Patrick Seale

 

Steven Heydemann serves as vice president of the Grants and Fellowships program and as special adviser to the Muslim World Initiative at the United States Institute of Peace (USIP). His research and teaching have focused on the comparative politics and the political economy of the Middle East. His interests include authoritarian governance, economic development, social policy, political and economic reform and civil society. Heydemann has also researched the relationship between institutions and economic development and philanthropy and the nonprofit sector. From 2003 to 2007, Heydemann directed the Center for Democracy and Civil Society at Georgetown University. From 2001 to 2003, he was director of the Social Science Research Council’s Program on Philanthropy and the Nonprofit Sector, with additional responsibility for development of new programs. 

 
Joshua Landis teaches modern Middle Eastern history and politics and writes on Syria and its surrounding countries. He writes "Syria Comment," a daily newsletter on Syrian politics that attracts some 3,000 readers a day. It is widely read by officials in Washington, Europe and Syria. Dr. Landis regularly travels to Washington DC to consult with the State Department and other government agencies. He is a frequent analyst on TV and radio (See: Landis in the News). Most recently he has appeared on the Jim Lehrer News Hour, Charlie Rose Show, CNN, Fox News, and has been widely quoted in the New York Times, Wall Street Journal, Washington Post, LA Times, and comments frequently for NPR and BBC radio. He has spoken at the Brookings Institute, USIP, Middle East Institute, and Council on Foreign Relations.
Fred H. Lawson is Professor of Government and Department Head at Mills College. His numerous publications include “Intra-Regime Dynamics, Uncertainty and the Persistence of Authoritarianism in the Contemporary Arab World,” in Oliver Schlumberger, ed. Debating Arab Authoritarianism (Stanford: Stanford University Press, 2007). He has published four books including Constructing International Relations in the Arab World (Stanford, CA: Stanford University Press, 2006) and Why Syria Goes to War: Thirty Years of Confrontation (Ithaca, N. Y.: Cornell, University Press, 1996).
David W. Lesch is Professor of Middle East History in the Department of History and Coordinator of the Middle East Concentration in the International Studies Program at Trinity University in San Antonio. Among his publications are the following books:  The New Lion of Damascus: Bashar al-Asad and Modern Syria (Yale University Press, 2005); Syria and the United States: Eisenhower's Cold War in the Middle East (Westview Press, 1992), He has signed an advanced contract with Blackwell Publishers to write, The History of the United States in the Middle East, An Interpretive History due out in 2011.
Patrick Seale is a leading British writer on the Middle East, and the author of The Struggle for Syria; also, Asad of Syria: The Struggle for the Middle East; and Abu Nidal: A Gun for Hire. He has been honored by Oxford University with a doctorate (D. Litt) and is a Senior Associate Member of St. Antony’s College. His journalistic experience includes six years with Reuters, and over twelve with The Observer (London). He has covered the Middle East, Africa and India.