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Melani Cammett and Ishac Diwan

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Toward a Political Economy of the Arab Uprisings (Part Two)

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[Part One of this article can be found here.] The Evolution of the Authoritarian Coalition and the Role of the Middle Classes In the initial decades after independence, Arab governments—and especially the republics—introduced policies that led to significant social change. In particular, statist economic policies coupled with welfare programs and subsidies on basic food items and fuel facilitated the rise of proto-middle classes. Public-sector workers, benefiting from job ...

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Toward a Political Economy of the Arab Uprisings (Part One)

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A framework to explain the Arab uprisings should provide an account of the socioeconomic and political evolution of the Arab republics that would explain both the persistence of autocracy until 2011 and its eventual collapse and should do so in a way that is empirically verifiable. Different analysts would approach such an ambitious question in distinct ways. Some would stress contingency and agency, and undeniably, there were such elements in the particular timing of the ...

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Bio

Melani Cammett and Ishac Diwan

 

Melani Cammett is Associate Professor of Political Science, a faculty associate at the Population Studies and Training Center, and a faculty fellow at the Watson Institute for International Studies at Brown University. During 2013-2014, she is a Takemi Fellow in International Health at the Harvard School of Public Health. She specializes in the political economy of development and the Middle East and teaches graduate and undergraduate courses on comparative politics, development, and Middle East politics, among other topics. She is the author of Globalization and Business Politics in North Africa: A Comparative Perspective (Cambridge, 2007) and Compassionate Communalism: Welfare and Sectarianism in Lebanon (Cornell, 2014), and co-editor (with Lauren Morris MacLean) of The Politics of Non-State Social Welfare in the Global South (Cornell, 2014). Her articles have appeared in in the Annual Review of Political Science, Comparative Politics, Journal of Conflict Resolution, the International Journal for Equity in Health, Studies in Comparative International Development, World Development, World Politics, and other scholarly journals, and she was awarded the 2011 Alexander L. George Award of the Qualitative and Mixed Methods Research Section of the American Political Science Association.

Ishac Diwan is Lecturer in Public Policy and the director for Africa and the Middle East at the growth lab of the Center for International Development at Harvard University. He received his PhD in economics from the University of California at Berkeley and taught international finance at New York University from 1984-87. In 1987, he joined the World Bank in the Research Complex, where he focused on international finance, trade, and macroeconomics. In 1992, he joined the Bank’s Middle East department, first as the country economist for the West Bank and Gaza, and later as a regional economist. He contributed to the Economic Research Forum and the Mediterranean Development Forum. Most recently, he has worked in Addis Ababa (2002-07) and Accra (2007-11), as the Bank’s Country Director for Ethiopia and Sudan, and then for Ghana, Liberia, Sierra Leone, Burkina Faso, and Guinea. At Harvard, he directs the Africa Growth Project at the Center for International Development, and the Economic and Political Transformation group at the Economic Research Forum.