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Agnieszka Paczynska

Contributor

Revolutionary Tremors in Central Asia?

[Image from author's archive]

On April 3rd, 2011 Kazakhstan held presidential elections. Nursultan Nazarbayev, in power since 1991, called these elections a year early after scrapping a plan to hold a national referendum that would do away with the inconvenience of regular presidential contests and which was to extend his term until 2020. The referendum plan, although backed by both chambers of the Kazakh legislature and an apparently willing public (5 million signature in support of the referendum ...

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Bio

Agnieszka Paczynska

 

Agnieszka Paczynska is an Associate Professor at the Institute for Conflict Analysis and Resolution, George Mason University and directs the Institute’s undergraduate program. She has published articles and book chapters on the relationship between economic and political change and conflict, distributive conflicts, the relationship between globalization processes and local conflicts, and post-conflict reconstruction policies. She is the author of State, Labor, and the Transition to a Market Economy: Egypt, Poland, Mexico and the Czech Republic (Penn State University Press, 2009) and is currently working on her second book Globalizing Reconstruction: Global South and Post-Conflict Peacebuilding. Before joining George Mason University, she was a research fellow at the Warsaw School of Economics, the American University in Cairo and University of Maryland. She has also worked at the Brookings Institution and Search for Common Ground, Washington, DC. During the 2008-09 academic year she was a Franklin Fellow working in the Office of the Coordinator for Reconstruction and Stabilization (S/CRS) at the State Department on post-conflict reconstruction planning. She has monitored elections in Ethiopia, Liberia and Afghanistan and has recently conducted conflict assessments in Liberia and Tajikistan. She holds a PhD in political science from the University of Virginia. She has also studied at New York University, the Center for Arabic Studies Abroad at the American University in Cairo and at Middlebury College.