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Zareena Grewal

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Zionism, BDS, and American Muslim Leadership

[Image from a demonstration in support of the Boycott, Divestment, Sanctions (BDS) movement. Image by Mike Glifford/Flickr.]

American Muslims are among the most diverse and heterogeneous national populations of Muslims in the world, made up of many different communities with different histories and priorities, yet American Muslim community leaders regularly refer to American Muslims as a singular community with a shared political agenda. Given the sociological fact of their diversity, consensus among American Muslims, particularly on controversial and divisive religious and political questions, is ...

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After Malcolm: Reconfiguring Our Maps and Histories

[Actor Ossie Davis delivers eulogy for Malcolm X at the funeral services for the slain leader in the Faith Temple of God in Christ in New York's Harlem, 27 February 1965. Image via Associated Press]

[This article is part of a six-person roundtable entitled “African American Muslims and the Black Freedom Struggle.” Click here for the introduction by Lindsey Stephenson and links to responses by Zareena Grewal, Abbas Barzegar, Mansa Bilal Mark King, Aminah B. McCloud, and Sohail Daulatzai. The initial question posed to the roundtable participants was: African American Muslims have been involved in the black freedom struggle for over a century, however their ...

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Bio

Zareena Grewal

 

Zareena Grewal is a historical anthropologist and a documentary filmmaker whose research focuses on race, gender, religion, nationalism, and transnationalism across a wide spectrum of American Muslim communities. Her first book, Islam is a Foreign Country: American Muslims and the Global Crisis of Authority (NYU 2013), is an ethnography of transnational Muslim networks that link US mosques to Islamic movements in the post-colonial Middle East through debates about the reform of Islam. Her first film, By the Dawn’s Early Light: Chris Jackson’s Journey to Islam (Cinema Guild 2004), examines the racialization of Islam and the scrutiny of American Muslims’ patriotism long before September 11,, 2001. Her new project combines ethnographic and cultural studies analyses with historical research on the range of meanings the Quran has had for Americans in relation to national debates about religious tolerance. She was a Fulbright Fellow in Egypt (2002-3) and she received the Fulbright's prestigious Islamic Civilization Grant.