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Paola Caridi & Lucia Sorbera

Borders Are There to Be Crossed

[The International Book Fair in Torino Logo]

Borders Are There to Be Crossed The International Book Fair in Torino, the second largest Book Fair in Europe, has announced that Saudi Arabia will no longer be the guest of honour in its 2016 event. Instead, next year’s fair will focus on Arab Literature more broadly. This move breaks with the fair’s long tradition of hosting a different country each year, in close collaboration with the embassies and the ministry of culture of the guest countries. It was almost midnight ...

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Bio

Paola Caridi & Lucia Sorbera

Paola Caridi (Roma, 1961) journalist, historian. She focused her research on Palestinian and Egyptian political history in the recent years, especially on political Islam and youth movements. She worked and lived in MENA region: t in Cairo (2001-2003) and then ten years in Jerusalem (2003-2012) as a reporter and a political analyst. She runs a blog, since 2008, on Arab politics and pop culture: invisiblearabs.com. After many years in the MENA region, she came back to Italy. She lives in Sicily, in a small town with ancient Arab roots. She wrote recently a playwright on Jerusalem, “Cafè Jerusalem”, on stage last  March in Genua, as a production of the renowned Teatro Stabile di Genova together with Suq Genova theatre association and world music renowned band Radiodervish.

Lucia Sorbera (PhD Ca’ Foscari University, Venice) is Senior Lecturer in the Department of Arabic Language and Cultures at the University of Sydney. Her research focuses on women and gender political and cultural history in North Africa and the Middle East. Among her recent publications: “Challenges of thinking feminism and revolution in Egypt between 2011 and 2014” in Post-Colonial Studies (17,1:2014) and “Early reflections of an historian on feminism in Egypt in time of revolution”, in Genesis, the Journal of the Italian Society of Women Historians (2013).