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Mohammed Bamyeh محمد بامية

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The June Rebellion in Egypt

[28 June 2013, anti-Morsi protester holding a sign in Arabic that reads:

Despite two and a half years of revolutionary experience, the rebels of June had no plan for the day after Morsi, just as they had no plan after Mubarak. One activist eloquently conveyed to me a typical attitude: he joined the 30 June protests because he believed in harakat al-shari’, the dynamism of the street, which would somehow produce the desired outcome. It was the same underlying logic of January 2011: too much planning makes the revolution heavy and immobile. ...

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الديمقراطية التشاركية والثورات العربية

عندما طالبت الشعوب العربية باسقاط النظام هنا وهناك، لم يكن لديها تصوّر مُفصّل حول طبيعة نظام ما بعد الثورة تتعدّى كونة نظاماً ديمقراطياً يتميّز بالشفافية واحترام حقوق المواطن وانعدام الفساد والمسؤليّة امام الشعب. ولكن بروز نزاعات صفرية بين مختلف القوى السياسية وممارسات اقصائية وحالة من الاحتقان والشعور بالاحباط في البلاد التي شهدت سقوط النظام القديم، كلّها تنبع من تجاهل عام لاطروحة مبدئية وبسيطة، الا وهي أن النظام الأكثر مناسبة لمرحلة ما بعد الثورة هو نظام يُجسّد روح الثورة. ...

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الشرعية الثورية: كيف تحل مكان شرعية القضاء والدستور؟

[متظاهرون في الاسكندرية في ايار 2011. تصوير ليليان وجدي]

برز مفهوم الشرعية الثورية في الأيام الأولى للثورات العربية كتعبير عن إرادة شعبية موحّدة أو شبة موحّدة لأسقاط الأنظمة القائمة، بما فيها دساتير تلك الأنظمة وأي قانون يعترض طريق الثورة. والغريب في الأمر هو أنه رغم القبول العام لهذا المبدأ في فترة بداية الثورة، فقد دخل إلى حيّز النسيان بعد مراحلها الأولى، وتم استبداله بالآليات القانونيّة المعتادة، كالإعلان الدستوري ونظام القضاء كما كان وما زال موجوداً منذ زمن ما قبل الثورة. وإذا نظرنا إلى مصر مثلاً، نرى كيف أن غياب مفهوم الشرعية ...

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فلسفة اللاسلطوية وثقافة الثورة

 الثورات الناجحة في التاريخ هي الثورات التي تغير الانسان وليس فقط انظمة الحكم. والثورات التنويريّة يمكن أن تُسمّى كذلك لأنها لا تُطيح بنظام حكم بقدر ما تُطيح بعقلية وثقافة سلطويّة مُنتشرة في المجتمع. ومن هذا المنظور يمكن القول بان النتائج الثقافية للثورات العربية الحالية لا يمكن رؤيتها بوضوح إذا ركّزنا أنظارنا فقط على الحراك السياسي في مرحلة الثورة وما بعدها، وهو حراك تمثله بشكل أساسي الديناميكيات الحزبيّه والعقليّات الدستوريّة. امّا إنجازات الثورة في ثقافة المجتمع فلا ...

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Anarchist, Liberal, and Authoritarian Enlightenments: Notes From the Arab Spring

[ADAM DANT

The Arab spring, as far as we can see, appears to require no guardian intellectual authority, no political leadership, no organized parties. In fact even after revolutionary success, those elements still fail to materialize: there is no party of the revolution anywhere, no leader emerges to embody its historical spirit, and intellectuals still ponder the meaning of revolutions that most of them endorsed but none expected. Furthermore, these apparent absences—political, ...

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Is the 2011 Libyan Revolution an Exception?

[Image from unknown archive.]

After the fall of Hosni Mubarak, the strong man of the Middle East on February 11, 2011, the Arab Spring appeared to be an unrelenting force. In the week following his downfall, three theaters of major rebellion—Libya, Yemen, Bahrain—quickly emerged, with Iran’s suppressed Green revolution resurfacing for a while as well. In the weeks that followed mass demonstrations demanding significant political reforms continued or sprang up in countries such as Jordan, Algeria, ...

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The Egyptian Revolution: First Impressions from the Field [Updated]

[Image from unknown archive]

Al-Qahira, The City Victorious, February 11, 2011 Never has a revolution that seemed so lacking in prospects gathered momentum so quickly and so unexpectedly. The Egyptian Revolution, starting on January 25, lacked leadership and possessed little organization; its defining events, on Friday, January 28, occurred on a day when all communication technologies, including all internet and phones, were barred; it took place in a large country known for sedate political life, a ...

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The Tunisian Revolution: Initial Reflections [Part 2]

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[This is the second and last installment. See Part 1 here]  The revolution in Tunisia was a response to a sense of closed possibilities. Nowhere do we see any identifiable “structure of opportunities” that could have made it possible. Everywhere we see the opposite—absence of any opportunities whatsoever. The pre-revolutionary climate displays a scene of extreme desperation and exasperation. And it is precisely that scene that was so poignantly allegorized in the ...

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The Tunisian Revolution: Initial Reflections [Part 1]

[Image from unknown archive]

At the moment it is abundantly easy to sense everywhere in the Arab World elation at what appears to be one of greatest events in modern Arab history. A genuine popular revolution, spontaneous and apparently leaderless, yet sustained and remarkably determined, overthrew a system that by all accounts had been the most entrenched and secure in the whole region. The wider implications beyond Tunisia are hard to miss. Just as in the case of the Iranian revolution more than three ...

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Bio

Mohammed Bamyeh محمد بامية

 

Mohammed Bamyeh is a professor of sociology at the University of Pittsburgh and the incoming editor of the International Sociology Review of Books (ISRB). He has held the Hubert Humphrey chair in International Studies at Macalester College in Saint Paul, Minnesota, and the SSRC-MacArthur Fellowship in International Peace and Security. He has previously taught at Georgetown University, New York University, and the University of Massachusetts.  

He received his Ph.D. in sociology from the University of Wisconsin-Madison in 1990. His subsequent areas of interest have included Islamic studies, sociology of religion, political and cultural globalization, civil society and social movements, and comparative social and political theory. His books include Anarchy as Order: The History and future of Civic Humanity (2009); Of Death and Dominion: The Existential Foundations of Governance (2007); The Ends of Globalization (2000); and The Social Origins of Islam: Mind, Economy, Discourse (1999, winner of the Albert Hourani Honorable Mention from the Middle East Studies Association). He has also edited Palestine America(published as a special issue of South Atlantic Quarterly, 2003), the forthcoming Intellectuals and Civil Society in the Middle East (2011); and co-edited Drugs in Motion: Mind and Body Altering Substances in the World’s Cultural Economy (published as a special issue of Cultural Critique, 2009).