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Michael Hudson

Contributor

Remembering Anthony Shadid

[Anthony Shadid. Image from Wikipedia.]

His untimely death silences one of the best Middle East reporters.  We at the Middle East Institute at the National University of Singapore, along with the global Middle East Studies community, mourn the loss of the brilliant, gifted Anthony Shadid, whose reporting of the Middle East over the past two decades enlightened all of us.  Perhaps he was not well known in Southeast Asia, except for readers of The New York Times, the Washington Post, and Boston ...

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Awakening, Cataclysm, or Just a Series of Events? Reflections on the Current Wave of Protest in the Arab World

[Image from guardian.co.uk]

Perhaps the best starting point for understanding the current remarkable wave of protest spreading across the Arab world, would be to examine the nomenclature used to describe or frame it.   To some observers it is seen as a ‘cataclysm.’ Others speak of the ‘contagion effect’. Still others might see it as simply a series of (fortunate or unfortunate) events not significantly related to each other. The terminology we use influences the conclusions we ...

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Oil Supply Disruption Poses a Threat to Asian Economies

[Image from www.thecommonwealth.com]

[Rana Khoury & Mary E. Stonaker co-authored this post] Why should Singapore – and Asia, more broadly – care about the astonishing upheavals rippling across the Middle East and northern Africa?  While seemingly far away, there is much at stake in this troubled region. The current turmoil should be a wake-up call for Asia to realize that what happens there has a growing impact on its economies and even on security issues. The Middle East is increasingly ...

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Bahrain Then and Now: Reflections on the Future of the Arab Monarchies

[Image of a 1979 New York Times article by Michael Hudson--download below]

Will Bahrain be the first Middle Eastern monarchy in recent times to collapse? The last one to bite the dust was Iran’s in 1979, following the demise of kingdoms in Libya (1969), North Yemen (1962), Tunisia (1956), Iraq (1958) and Egypt (1952). Like dominoes they seemed to be falling in that era, giving rise to the idea that monarchies were political dinosaurs. But later on, as the remaining monarchies survived, it appeared that the people were more prepared to confer ...

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Egypt on the Brink: The Arab World at a Tipping Point?

[Image from unknown archive]

Hosni Mubarak is still President of Egypt but his days in power are numbered. There will be no Mubarak dynasty either. The authoritarian order in Egypt and throughout the Arab world has been profoundly shaken. The ousting of Ben Ali in Tunisia, a remarkable event in itself, now appears to have been the trigger for a far broader upheaval that is shaking regimes across the region.   Since Muhammad Bouazizi set himself alight in Tunisia on December 17, ...

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Bio

Michael Hudson

 

Michael C. Hudson is Director of the Middle East Institute at the National University of Singapore. He is also Professor of International Relations at the School of Foreign Service, at Georgetown University. Michael has edited and contributed to numerous books, including Middle East Dilemma: The Politics and Economics of Arab Integration (Columbia University Press/CCAS, 1999), The Palestinians: New Directions (CCAS, 1990), and Alternative Approaches to the Arab-Israeli Conflict (CCAS, 1984). His other works include The Precarious Republic: Political Modernization in Lebanon (Random House, 1968, 1985), World Handbook of Political and Social Indicators (co-author, Yale University Press, 1972),Arab Politics: The Search for Legitimacy (Yale University Press, 1977), Middle East Dilemma (ed., Columbia University Press, 1999), numerous chapters, and articles appearing in Middle East Journal, Middle East Policy, International Affairs, Comparative Politics, Al-Mustaqbil al-'Arabi, and other scholarly journals.