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Wafa Ben Hassine

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Arab Maghreb Union: Overcoming Competition in Favor of Cooperation (Part II)

[Emblem of the Arab Maghreb Union. Image from Wikimedia]

[This article is the final part in a two-part Jadaliyya series on the Arab Maghreb Union. Read the first part here.] Comparison with ASEAN: From Crisis to Unity The global economy is making it increasingly difficult for non-integrated countries to be economically viable. Regional alliances have paved the way, internationally, for greater economic harmonization. In this article, the Association of Southeast Asian Nations (ASEAN) will be briefly studied to show that most ...

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Arab Maghreb Union: Overcoming Competition in Favor of Cooperation (Part I)

[Emblem of the Arab Maghreb Union. Image from Wikimedia]

[This article is the first in a two-part Jadaliyya series on the Arab Maghreb Union.] In his book Making Globalization Work, Joseph Stiglitz said, “As countries of the world become more closely integrated, they become more interdependent. Greater interdependence gives rise to a greater need for collective action to solve common problems.” The need for cooperation and interdependence could not be more obvious than in the North African countries of the Maghreb–namely, Libya, ...

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Wafa Ben Hassine on Social Media in Post-Ben Ali Tunisia

[Image of Wafa Ben Hassine.]

[This post is part of an ongoing Profile of a Contemporary Conduit series on Jadaliyya that seeks to highlight distinct voices primarily in and from the Middle East, North Africa, and South Asia.] Jadaliyya (J): What do you think are the most gratifying aspects of Tweeting and Twitter? Wafa Ben Hassine (WBH): The intellectual exchange of information. The most unique aspect of Twitter is the ability to form little niches about very particularized topics. You want to talk ...

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Mainstream Media Coverage on Tunisia: Short, Bittersweet, and Overly Deficient

[Screenshot of Al Jazeera English's Tunisia section.]

We all know that after former Tunisian president Ben Ali packed his bags, Egyptian Mubarak and Libyan Gaddafi soon shared similar fates. One was hospitalized for political and moral exhaustion, the other killed in what was a Hollywood-worthy (but slightly gorier) scene. Suddenly, the short-lived spotlight on Tunisia was quickly shifted to Egypt and Libya. The heavy news coverage in Egypt and Libya continues till this day. Tunisia was pushed back to, at best, starring on ...

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Post-Ben Ali Partisan Developments in Tunisia: The Guarantor of Pluralism in a Nascent Democracy

[A voter peruses an officially designated wall where parties were permitted to present their campaign posters for the Tunisian elections. Image by Freedom at Issue/Flickr.]

It was early afternoon at the Congress for the Republic (CPR) headquarters in downtown Tunis, known amongst its members as Hezb el Koujina — literally, the Kitchen Party. Mr. Mohammed Abbou, standing in the CPR headquarter's actual koujina (kitchen) was hurriedly eating a sandwich before scuffling off to a meeting with the rest of the party's political bureau. Abbou, currently Tunisia’s Minister of Administrative Reform, was trying his best to swallow bites of his sandwich, ...

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Time for a 'Bourguibist' Comeback? Essebsi Butters up Tunisians in Monastir

[Image of rally held in Monastir. Image by Nawaat.]

The dome shaped room was a sea of red and white. It smelled of amber musk and sea. The attendees were mostly well over the age of forty, and the buzz of excitement was impossible to miss. You would think you were attending a Michael Jackson concert. What’s the occasion, you ask? Well, to celebrate and adulate the ultimate star of the show, Beji Caid Essebsi – or, as the attendees would proudly tell you, to “unite all political forces as Tunisian above all else,” and to ...

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Bio

Wafa Ben Hassine

 

Wafa Ben Hassine is a writer, human rights advocate, and law graduate, specializing in international law and technology. She has attained her Juris Doctor from the University of Denver Sturm College of Law, and her B.A. in Political Science, Public Law from the University of California San Diego. She primarily writes about women's rights, Internet governance and digital rights in the Arab world, and transparency in government. She is currently researching counterterrorism and anti-cybercrime legislation in the Arab world and their impact on various human rights online. 

After completing her undergraduate studies, Wafa moved back to Tunisia. While there, she worked as a legislative aide to a National Constituent Assembly member, a columnist for Nawaat (an activist blogging collective), and as the Editor in Chief of Tunisia Live. Her experience in journalism, government, and civil society enabled her to cultivate a wide network across sectors and fields in the country. Wafa has also interned at the Special Tribunal for Lebanon’s Appeals Chamber in The Hague, Netherlands, and the U.S. Department of State’s Bureau of Human Rights, Democracy, and Labor in drafting its annual human rights reports. 

 

Wafa has a deep-rooted passion for human rights and aims to further her skills in a legal framework for the benefit of the global south.