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Haytham Bahoora

Guest

On Iraq War Revisionism: Kanan Makiya and the Arab Revolutions

[US Army Sergeant of a UH-60A Black Hawk helicopter. Photo by Sgt. Maryalice Leone of U.S. Marine Corps via Flickr]

Commemoration of the tenth anniversary of the US invasion and occupation of Iraq by those responsible for waging it has taken largely unapologetic form. Donald Rumsfeld tweeted about the “long, difficult work of liberating 25 mil Iraqis,” and that those who “played a role in history deserve our respect and appreciation.” He ostensibly includes himself in this group. Paul Wolfowitz suggested that “we still don’t know how all this is all going to end,” hopeful that Iraq might ...

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Shock-and-Awe Nation Building: Iraq's Neo-Liberal Reconstruction

[View of Sadr City in the days preceding the December 2005 Iraqi legislative election. Image from Wikimedia Commons.]

The Iraqi government’s contractual delivery of Iraqi oil fields to foreign multinationals is perhaps the most consequential long-term economic consequence of the US invasion and occupation of Iraq. Contracts have been signed, production rights to massive oil fields sold, and a steady stream of propaganda disseminated about Iraqi oil production eventually rivaling that of Saudi Arabia and Iran. The celebratory narrative of Iraq’s expanding oil production has been marketed as ...

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Bio

Haytham Bahoora

 

Haytham Bahoora is Assistant Professor at the Department of Asian Languages and Civilizations at CU-Boulder, he was a postdoctoral fellow at the research program “Europe in the Middle East: The Middle East in Europe” at the Institute for Advanced Study in Berlin. His research interests include modern Arabic literature and culture, aesthetic modernisms, architecture and urban studies, postcolonial theory, questions of political modernity, and the relationship between material and discursive culture. He is currently working on a book manuscript titled Modernism before Modernity: Literature and Urban Form in Iraq which links the production of aesthetic modernisms in Iraq to a particular moment of uneven social and economic development in 1950s urban Baghdad.