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Algeria

Kateb Yacine: A Profile from the Archives

[Algerian writer Kateb Yacine]

[”A Profile from the Archives“ is a series published by Jadaliyya in both Arabic and English in cooperation with the Lebanese newspaper, Assafir. These profiles will feature iconic figures who left indelible marks in the politics and culture of the Middle East and North Africa. This profile was originally published in Arabic and was translated by Mazen Hakeem.] Name: Kateb Last Name: Yacine Date of Birth: 1929 Date of Death: 1989 Place of Birth: Smondo - Constantine Wife’s Name: Zobaida Sharghi Category: Writer Profession: Playwright, novelist, and poet Kateb Yacine   Algerian national. Born in a town called Smondo near Constantine on 6 ...

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From the World Cup to the 'Great Replacement': Football and Racist Narratives in France

[Image from the 2014 World Cup in Brazil. Image by Gisele Teresinha/Flickr.]

Football is the greatest of all sports. And yet, despite the beauty of the game, what happens can become so distasteful that it is difficult to continue watching. I cannot help but feel that during the World Cup, a wide coalition of imbeciles is actively plotting to ruin my pleasure. I am not speaking of Luis Suarez and the biting incident but instead of France and Algeria. If you are following the competition, you already know that Algeria qualified for the knockout stage on Thursday night for the first time, after a draw against Russia. The team is not particularly brilliant, but they have some gutsy players who demonstrate both discipline and ability to counter ...

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In Algiers, the Twenties Are No Longer the Best Years

[Image calling for the release of Mohand Kadi and Moez Bennecir. Image courtesy of Mondafrique.]

Two young activists, one is Algerian and the other is Tunisian. They look like two drops of water: thin, close fitting sweaters, Zara can be read on one of them, it is not a war cry, just a brand name, short and wise hair, clean shaven. The first, Mohand Kadi, is a student and activist with the Raj Association (The Assembly of Youth Action). He is only twenty-three years old. The other, Moez Bennecir, is an editing assistant and is twenty-five years old. This is the age during which the judicial apparatus decided to let them languish in the terrible Serkaji prison in Algiers since 16 April, the date of their arrest. Side-by-side they arrived without a sound, behind an ...

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A Alger, vingt ans n’est pas le plus bel age de la vie

[Image d'une affiche pour la libération de Mohand Kadi et Moez Bennecir. Image de Mondafrique.]

Deux jeunes activistes, l'un est algérien, le second est tunisien. Ils se ressemblent comme deux gouttes d'eau, minces, pull près du corps, Zara, peut-on lire sur l'un d'entre eux, ce n'est pas un cri de guerre, juste le nom d'une marque, cheveux courts et sages, rasés de près. Le premier Mohand Kadi est étudiant et militant de l'association Raj, rassemblement Action jeunesse, il n'a que vingt-trois ans. Le second, Moez Bennecir est assistant d'édition, il a vingt-cinq ans. C'est l'âge auquel la machine judiciaire à décidé de les laisser croupir depuis le 16 avril, date de leur arrestation, dans la terrible prison de Serkaji à Alger. Côte à côte ils sont arrivés, sans ...

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Sahrawi Realities: Space, Architecture, and Mobility of Displacement (Part 1)

[View of the Sand Berm built by Morocco that separates between territory the Moroccan government controls and the territory the Sahrawi Arab Democratic Republic (SADR) controls. Image by author.]

[This is the first of a series of articles that seek to reflect on the ways in which social mobilization, creation of space, and new modes of resistance intersect within the Sahrawi community. Between these grooves are nuanced conceptions of Sahrawi identity that are colored by varied experiences but a shared memory of external domination and displacement. The series is informed by research conducted during a weeklong stay in the Dakhla refugee camp, located about one hundred miles southeast of Tindouf. A week is nowhere near sufficient to fully grasp the over forty years Sahrawi refugees have lived in these conditions and away from their land. A week, however, is ...

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Notes sur l'élection présidentielle algérienne

[Image de l'Assemblée populaire nationale. Image par Magharebia/Flickr.]

Jeudi 17 avril, il est vingt-deux heures trente, et le concert des klaxons retentit depuis une bonne heure dans Alger-centre. Le Président-roulant a gagné. Ses supporteurs ne sont guère nombreux, mais ils gesticulent et font autant de bruit que possible. La plupart ne s'arrêtent pas et passent en voiture autour du jardin de l'Horloge. Un vieux commandant de police admoneste les passagers d'une voiture officielle qui insistent pour se garer à l'endroit où il se tient debout, comme s'il était devenu quantité négligeable, comme si un bout de papier leur donnait le droit d'écraser un type en uniforme de trente ans leur aîné. Le flic les remet à leur place. Pendant ce temps ...

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The Vagabond

[Cover of Le vagabond, Éditions bleu autour, 2007]

They saw him arrive one summer evening. It was hot, very hot. Man and beast seemed to sleep in the shade of the walls. Wrapped from head to toe, barely able to open an eye, they seemed forever petrified into statues, turned in on themselves, alone in the silence of the high plains.  No one suspected, nothing about them suggested they were men except their shape obvious beneath the folds of fabric.  It was the color of the earth in which they had worked in the dawn’s coolness, those mild hours that let them earn their bread—hard to imagine the wakeful attention, the watchfulness of these sleeping bodies. They saw everything; they even heard grass or a stone ...

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'Justifications of Power': Neoliberalism and the Role of Empire

[Anti-WEF grafitti in Lausanne, Switzerland, after the 2004 WEF in Evian (France). The writting reads:

[This article is the second in a three-part Jadaliyya series that looks at Foucault's work in relationship to the legacy of French colonialism in North Africa. Read the first installment here: "The Dangers of Liberalism: Foucault and Postcoloniality in France" by Diren Valayden] “I am like the crawfish and advance sideways.”[1] So Foucault warns us in the Birth of Biopolitics. And indeed, one would need to be an extremely nimble, if not heroic, crawfish to claim that Foucault espoused a serious reflection on French colonialism in North Africa. Point taken. What is irrefutable, however, is that his writings have had an enormous impact on ...

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Cynical and Macabre 'Politics of Migration' at Morocco’s Borders

[Image from the #lasfronterasmatan campaign. Image from Twitter user @fanetin.]

“Despite a year marked by successive tragedies as a result of the recrudescence of repression, institutional violence and racism, will 2013 mark a historical turn for politics of migration in Morocco? Will foreigners and migrants be recognized into society?” These questions headed an article by Micheline Bochet Milon, a member of the Groupe anti-raciste d’accompagnement et de défense des étrangers et des migrants (GADEM), in the last issue of the Louna-Tounkaranké network’s newsletter. At the time, migrants’ associations and NGOs were wedged between hope and caution as several important changes unraveled in Morocco. The most important of these was the unprecedented ...

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The State of the Western Sahara

[Image of Sahrawi women protesting against Moroccan occupation. Image from WesternSahara/Flickr.]

In June 2013, Maghreb Page co-editor, Samia Errazzouki, and I produced an electronic roundtable of articles describing various historical and political contours of the Western Saharan conflict, opening with a brief summary of its history:  Beginning as a post-colonial dispute between regional powers in the 1970s, the conflict developed and was exacerbated as North Africa became an entangled site of Cold War rivalries. Following the 1975 Madrid Accords, in which Spain conceded on its promises to the Sahrawi people on honoring their right to self-determination through a referendum, Spain instead split the territory between Mauritania and Morocco. By then, the ...

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Maghreb Media Roundup (December 30)

[The walled city of Ghardaia in Algeria’s M’zab region has seen increasingly violent tension in recent weeks. Photo courtesy of Wikipedia.]

[This is a roundup of news articles and other materials circulating on the Maghreb and reflects a wide variety of opinions. It does not reflect the views of the Maghreb Page Editors or of Jadaliyya. You may send your own recommendations for inclusion in each week's roundup to maghreb@jadaliyya.com by Thursday night of every week.]  Algeria L’Algérie face à son destin, d’Abdelkader ben Mahieddine à Tareq Mammeri  Adel Herik postulates that Algeria has been bound to repeating history for fifty years. Khalifa peut conclure un deal avec les autorités In an interview with Hadjer Guenafa, lawyer Khaled Bourayou offers predictions on formerly-exiled ...

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الثورة الجزائرية: محاورة الماضي

[نساء الجزائر. مصدر الصورة

انطلقت ثورة الفاتح من نوفمبر في العام 1954 بنداء وجهته رسالة جبهة التحرير الوطني إلى الشعب الجزائري قائلة "إذا كان هدف أي حركة ثورية في الواقع هو خلق جميع الظروف الثورية للقيام بعملية تحريرية، فإننا نعتبر الشعب الجزائري في أوضاعه الداخلية متحداً حول قضية الاستقلال والعمل"، داعية بذلك الشعب للانخراط بكليته في الثورة التي أنهت في العام 1962 الاستعمار الفرنسي الذي رابط في الجزائر منذ العام 1830، بإعلان استقلال الجزائر وإنشاء الجمهورية الجزائرية. خصت جدلية ذكرى انطلاقة الثورة الجزائرية بملف يتناولها، خلال شهر تشرين الثاني/نوفمبر. أدناه روابط جميع المقالات التي نشرت. وإذ تبدو سيرة الثورة الجزائرية قصية في حضرة التاريخ الذي نشهده في العالم العربي وبهوية ...

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Baya Mahieddine: A Profile from the Archives

[A Profile from the Archives is a series published by Jadaliyya in both Arabic and English in cooperation with the Lebanese newspaper, Assafir. These profiles will feature iconic figures who left indelible marks in the politics and culture of the Middle East and North Africa. This profile was originally published in Arabic  and was translated by Mazen Hakeem.] Baya Mahieddine (aka Fatima Haddad) was an Algerian plastic artist of tribal origin. She was born in 1931 in the ...

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New JADMAG: The Afterlives of the Algerian Revolution

The Afterlives of the Algerian Revolution  Edited by Muriam Haleh Davis  E-version: $3.49 Paperback: $5.99 Combo: $7.99   In July 2012, Algeria celebrated its 50th anniversary of independence, which signaled the victory of the FLN (National Liberation Front) over the French army. Despite five decades of Algerian independence, much of the work done on Algeria continues to focus on the colonial period. This pedagogical publication seeks to interrogate Algerian history ...

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The Black Box of French History

Andrew Hussey, The French Intifada: The Long War Between France and Its Arabs. London: Granta, 2014. In 2005, a series of disturbing events occurred in France. In February, the parliament attempted to pass a law to force schools to teach “the positive role of French presence overseas, especially in North Africa.” That same autumn, riots erupted in a number of suburbs northeast of Paris, gradually spreading to other French cities and provoking the government to declare a state of emergency that had ...

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New Texts Out Now: Andrea Khalil, Women, Gender, and the Arab Spring

Andrea Khalil, editor, Women, Gender, and the Arab Spring, special issue of The Journal of North African Studies 19.2 (2014). Forthcoming as a book with Routledge. Jadaliyya (J): What made you put together this special issue?  Andrea Khalil (AK): During my fieldwork in Tunisia (2011-13) working on a book, I was sensitized to the profound problems that women in Tunisia were facing since the Revolution, and more generally, the urgency to address gender issues and activism in the new context. The ...

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Notes on the Algerian Presidential Elections

Thursday 17 April: It is 10:30 PM and the concert of honking cars has been playing for a good hour in downtown Algiers. The “president on wheels” (le Président-roulant) has won. His supporters are not particularly numerous, but they are gesticulating and making as much noise as possible. Most of them continue and pass around the jardin de l'Horloge in their vehicles. An old police commander admonishes the passengers in an official car that insists on parking where he is standing—as if he was invisible ...

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Foucault, Fanon, Intellectuals, Revolutions

[This article is the final in a three-part Jadaliyya series that looks at Foucault's work in relationship to the legacy of French colonialism in North Africa. Read the first and second installments here: "The Dangers of Liberalism: Foucault and Postcoloniality in France" by Diren Valayden and "Justifications of Power": Neoliberalism and the Role of Empire by Muriam Haleh Davis.] My theoretical ethic is…“antistrategic”: to be respectful when a ...

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الجزائر : لماذا رُشِّح بوتفليقة لعهدة رابعة؟

لم يكن ترشيح الرئيس بوتفليقة لانتخابات نيسان/ أبريل 2014 الرئاسية لِيُحدث كلَّ هذه الضجة لو كان في صحة جيدة، يتوجه إلى الجزائريين بالحديث من حين لآخر مباشرة، لا عبر وزراءَ يرتّلون رسائله الروتينية على مسامعهم دون كثير من الاقتناع. والحال أن مجلس الوزراء، منذ مدة ليست بالقصيرة، لم يعد ينعقد بسبب مرضه، وأنه لم يعد يمثل الجزائرَ في المحافل الدولية، وهو هاوي السفر والتجوال، ولا يستقبل الوفود الأجنبية إلا نادرا، وربما أساسا بغرض تمكين وسائل الإعلام الحكومية من تصويره لمدة دقائق وإقناع الشعب بأنه في عداد ...

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Bouteflika’s Fourth Mandate: The Cartel’s Gamble

The Algerian regime can be understood as an economic cartel. It is, in other words, an assemblage of actors that controls a field (the State), and must agree on certain things in order to assure its benefits – whether they are material or symbolic. These actors are of different stripes (military, technocrats, politicians) and do not need to agree on all of the actions or decisions taken by the government. Instead, they often find themselves in disaccord or in competition, which explains the infighting ...

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Le quatrième mandat de Bouteflika : Un pari du cartel

Le régime algérien peut être compris comme un cartel économique. Il s'agit d'une réunion d'acteurs qui contrôlent un champ (l'Etat), et s'accordent afin de garantir leurs bénéfices, que ceux-ci soient matériels ou symboliques. Ces acteurs d'horizons divers (militaires, technocrates, politiciens) n'ont pas besoin d'être d'accords sur toutes les orientations du gouvernement. Bien au contraire, ils sont souvent en désaccord voir en concurrence, ce qui se traduit par des querelles qui s'expriment parfois par ...

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Maghreb Media Roundup (January 27)

[This is a roundup of news articles and other materials circulating on the Maghreb and reflects a wide variety of opinions. It does not reflect the views of the Maghreb Page Editors or of Jadaliyya. You may send your own recommendations for inclusion in each week's roundup to maghreb@jadaliyya.com by Thursday night of every week.] Algeria Présidentielle #dz2014: les jeux sont (déjà) faits. Baki 7our Mansour predicts a fourth term for the ailing incumbent Bouteflika. Algérie: Un géant vert en ...

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Maghreb Media Roundup (December 9)

[This is a roundup of news articles and other materials circulating on the Maghreb and reflects a wide variety of opinions. It does not reflect the views of the Maghreb Page Editors or of Jadaliyya. You may send your own recommendations for inclusion in each week's roundup to maghreb@jadaliyya.com by Thursday night of every week.]  Geopolitics Bouteflika écrit au roi Mohamed VI  President Abdelaziz Bouteflika writes to King Mohamed VI, invoking shared history and neglecting any ...

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معارضة مستحيلة: سحر نظام الحزب الواحد

يُمثّل عام 1962 على المستوى السياسي ولادة الجزائر المستقلة بقيادة جبهة التحرير الوطني التي انتصرت في تنافسها على جميع الأحزاب السياسية الأخرى. وكان الحزب الشيوعي الجزائري الحزب السياسي الوحيد الذي تجنّب الهزيمة الساحقة والحلّ في سياق التنافس مع جبهة التحرير الوطني. لجأ الحزب الشيوعي الجزائري إلى العمل السري سنة 1955 بعد أن حظرته السلطات الفرنسية. أنشأ وحداته المقاتلة ذات العدد الصغير التي دُعيتْ "مقاتلون من أجل الحرية". وتضمّنت اتفاقية الحزب الشيوعي الجزائري مع جبهة التحرير الوطني في ...

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