Follow Us

Follow on Twitter    Follow on Facebook    YouTube Channel    Vimeo Channel    Tumblr    SoundCloud Channel    iPhone App    iPhone App

Intervention, Libya, Jadaliyya: A Documentary Remix

[Image from VJ Um Amel.]

The following is an audio-visual documentary remix by VJ Um Amel of "On International Intervention and the Dire Situation in Libya," an article by Asli Bali and Ziad Abu-Rish originally published on Jadaliyya on February 23, 2011. See video below. 

Keep Reading »

الخروج من الميدان [Exiting the Square]

[Signs and Slogans at Tahrir Square. Image by Haytham El-Wardany]

لم نكن نسمع بكلمة «ثورة» سوى في الكتب والأفلام. الثورة الفرنسية، الثورة البلشفية، الثورة الإسلامية، الثورة الثقافية، الثورة الكوبية، ثورة الطلبة... كل ثورة كانت تزيد مهابة الكلمة، وتجعلها ـــــ بفضل جسامة أحداثها وعظمة أفكارها، ثم ما آلت إليه مصائرها ــ مشحونةً وملتبسة. وشقّت الكلمة حياةً لها في مخيّلاتنا. كانت الثورة تلوح في أذهاننا كاستدعاءات متخيلة للحظات استثنائية «يكافح» الجميع فيها لـ «صنع التاريخ». لحظات تشبه مرجلاً ضخماً يتضاءل حجمنا بجانبه، وينصهر فيه الجميع. لذلك، كنا في حيرة ونحن نضع الكلمة على ألسنتنا، فكنا نتحسسها شيئاً فشيئاً، نتلعثم في نطقها كأننا نتعلم الكلام لتونا. تارةً تتملّكنا حيادية المنطق، فنفضّل استخدام كلمة انتفاضة، وتارةً أخرى تغلبنا العاطفة ...

Keep Reading »

"The Poetry of Revolt" by Elliott Colla Nominated for Award - Vote Now!

[Screen shot of Elliott Colla's

We are very excited that Elliott Colla's article, "The Poetry of Revolt," (published by Jadaliyya on January 31, 2011), has just been nominated for the Three Quarks Daily Prize in Arts and Literature. Show your support of Elliott Colla's piece and Jadaliyya by participating in the public voting for "Best Blog or E-zine Writing on Arts and Literature." Public voting will narrow the list of nominees down to the top-twenty, from which the editors of Three Quarks Daily will select the top-six. The top-three finalists will be selected by Laila Lalami. To participate and cast your vote, click here, select the entry entitled "Jadaliyya: The Poerty of ...

Keep Reading »

And the Late Night Comedians Shall Lead Us

[Stephen Colbert and John Stewart. Image from Pulse2.com]

For those of you lucky readers who are able to access Al Jazeera or Al Arabiya on your televisions, you can stop reading now. This is for those of us, in the US, who either have to sleep with our laptops streaming the “real” news or who, for fear that our batteries may die, have to set our cell phone alarm clocks to wake up at 3:00 a.m. to watch reporting of a firefight in Benghazi or the de-powerification of another corrupt politician in (pick one) Palestine, Yemen, Iraq, Egypt, Algeria, Bahrain (and the list goes on). You lucky Al Jazeera and Al Arabiya subscribers can pity us, for indeed we deserve your pity. But we are not completely without our own reliable ...

Keep Reading »

من يخاف من أحلام جعفر بناهي؟ [Who is Afraid of Jafar Panahi's Dreams?]

 [Jafar Panahi. Image from unknown archive]

 ست سنوات سجن وعدم مزاولة الإخراج لعشرين عاماً وعدم الاتصال بالصحفين هي بعض الأحكام الصادرة بحق المخرج الإيراني جعفر بناهي (ت. 1960) ومجموعة من زملاءه عن محكمة إيرانية في العشرين من ديسمبر الماضي. والتهمة المساقة هي تشويه صورة إيران والقيام بدعاية مغرضة ضد النظام. نظام يبدو أنه أفلس إلى هذه الدرجة فأصبح يخاف من أفلام بناهي التي تتناول بالدرجة الاولى قضايا إجتماعية. وكأن هذا النظام يريد أن يطلق رصاصة تغتال أحلام جعفر بناهي، الأحلام المستوحاة من الواقع، كما يقول في الرسالة التي وجهها إلى مهرجان البرليناله السينمائي (إنعقد بين  10-20 فبراير 2011). بدت إزابيلا روسوليني، رئيسة لجنة التحكيم الرئيسية في مهرجان هذا العام، تغالب دموعها وهي تقرأ رسالة المخرج الايراني ...

Keep Reading »

Map of Libya According to Qaddafi Imagi-Nation

[Image by Ibtisam Barakat]

[This cartoon was prepared after Qaddafi's third speech on February 25, in which he equated Libya with himself . . . ]

Keep Reading »

Egypt: A Multi-Generational Revolt

[Image from unknown source]

In the mainstream Western and Arab media, Egypt’s revolution is often presented as a revolution of the youth. While it is true that young activists planned the January 25th demonstrations and organized and raised support throughout much of the process leading up to that day, this uprising would not have succeeded in ousting the President and Cabinet, and would not be continuing, were it not for older generations of Egyptians. Many of us living in Egypt during the first massive demonstrations kept saying, “We never thought this would happen.” But in retrospect, it was as clear as day. For the past few years, workers had launched thousands of strikes ...

Keep Reading »

How Egyptian Women Took Back the Street Between Two “Black Wednesdays”: A First Person Account

[Women protesting in Tahrir Square; Image from Daily Mail Online]

On February 16, Roger Ebert, an American film critic and commentator, tweeted: "The attack on Lara Logan brings Middle East attitudes toward women into sad focus." While the attack on CBS News correspondent Lara Logan was a tragic and upsetting event, it needs to be understood in its political context. Any attempt to propound this in such familiar orientalist terms would be offensive and unfair, not only to Egyptians protesting for democracy, but to Logan herself. She was not attacked as a woman--although the gendered nature of the assault is indisputable; she was attacked as a professional journalist and a supporter of the Egyptian protest. I, too, was ...

Keep Reading »

A Word on Africa: Djibouti

[Image from rethinkingschools.org]

“Arab world unrest reaches Horn of Africa” was how the Israeli website Ynet led off its coverage of the demonstrations that began in Djibouti yesterday. On Friday, thousands of protesters — 6,000, according to the Independent, in a country with a population of less than a million people — demanded the resignation of President Ismail Omar Guelleh, among other political reforms. Authorities used batons and fired tear gas grenades at demonstrators; by the end of the day, according to official reports, one protester and one policeman had been killed. As sporadic protests continued today, the government responded by detaining three opposition leaders: National Democratic ...

Keep Reading »

Iraq and Its Tahrir Square

[Government building in flames after protests in al-Qut. Image from al-Jazeera]

[This article is a slightly updated and edited translation of the original Arabic version that was posted on Jadaliyya and can be found here.] Iraq’s absence from the “Egypt Today, Tomorrow the World” map, published a week after the massive demonstration in Egypt on January 25th and which included the dates of planned demonstrations in different Arab capitals, was striking. The absence was not limited to the dates listed. Iraq as a country was not included. It is as if the absence of protests indicated the absence of the country itself. As if Iraq was not affected by the recent events in Tunisia and Egypt. This conspicuous absence is due to the nature of the present ...

Keep Reading »

Iranians In Solidarity with Egyptians and Tunisians Need Your Support, Now

[Poster for 25 Bahman (February 14) demonstrations, from the 25 Bahman Facebook page]

While celebrating the exhilarating achievements of the popular democratic uprisings in Tunisia and Egypt, I have also been consumed with a restless hope and deepening concern for Iranians with parallel dreams of realizing a free and democratic society. Iranian pro-democracy activists and opposition figures Mir Hossein Moussavi and Mehdi Karroubi have called for peaceful rallies across the country today, on the 25th of Bahman (February 14), to express solidarity for the spreading democratic movements in Egypt and Tunisia, and, implicitly, to revitalize their own popular civil rights movement, known as the Green Movement. In Tehran, the planned rally is to conclude at ...

Keep Reading »

Egypt's Revolution 2.0: The Facebook Factor

[Image by Carlos Lattuf]

The call for a Day of Rage on January 25, 2011 that ignited the Egyptian revolution originated from a Facebook page. Many have since asked: Is this a “Facebook Revolution?”  It is high time to put this question to rest and insist that political and social movements belong to people and not to communication tools and technologies. Facebook, like cell phones, the internet, and twitter, do not have agency, a moral universe, and are not predisposed to any particular ideological or political orientation. They are what people make of them. Facebook is no more responsible for Egypt’s revolution than Gutenberg’s printing press with movable type was responsible for the ...

Keep Reading »

Don't Blame the King for Islamophobia, Blame the Kingdom

Peter King and the Homeland Security Committee’s hearings on the radicalization of American Muslims are upon us. Mainstream op-ed pieces have increasingly suggested the "divisiveness" of this New McCarthyism, especially after the Southern Poverty Law Center listed Robert Spencer and Pamela Geller’s Stop Islamification of America as a hate group and after the Nuremburg-like Tea Bagging of a Yorba Linda Mosque.       Muslim-baiting is not new nor is the strategy to divide and ...

Keep Reading »

The Peter King "Radicalization of Muslims" Hearing and American Democracy

Republicans clearly think that they have found a political winner in Muslim-bashing. Peter King, Republican representative from New York’s Third Congressional District (in Long Island), is the new chair of the House Homeland Security Committee. He was way ahead of the Muslim-bashing curve. Most Republicans didn’t get excited about the possibilities of using an anti-Muslim platform as a wedge issue until 2010, after the wild popularity of the "Obama is a secret Muslim" meme and the meteoric rise ...

Keep Reading »

Iraq Too?

Many cast doubts that the lung through which Tunisia breathed freedom could give birth to kindred lungs in Arab lands to the east or west. Even after Egypt shook the earth to dethrone its last Pharaoh, doubts were cast again as to the mobility of the phenomenon. Then came Libya, which is on the verge of casting away its dangerously delusional and brutal despot. Tunisia is everywhere. The spirit of the mythical bird, al-Bouazizi, hovers, together with those of other martyrs, in every Arab sky, from ...

Keep Reading »

The Fabric of Democracy

When disturbed, they usually escape by running and rarely take to flight. (The Common Peacock) In Rogues, his 2003 volume on rogue states,[1] Jacques Derrida looked to Plato's Republic in order to assess the Grecian syntagma of democracy as ‘democracy to come.’ Passages from the Republic referring to ‘democratic man and his freedoms’ hold special relevance; Derrida used it to examine the rise of Islamism in Algeria but I would like to focus on the relationship between clothing, democracy ...

Keep Reading »

Bad Faith at the Book Festival

“Everywhere you look the boycott debate is in the news,” Joseph Dana notes in a recent article on his blog. The most prominent example involves British novelist Ian McEwan, who rejected calls to boycott the 2011 Jerusalem Book Festival after being awarded the Jerusalem Prize. Instead, McEwan, in his acceptance speech last week, offered some words of criticism for Israeli policies, including settlements and the siege of Gaza, while simultaneously paying tribute to “the precious tradition of a democracy of ...

Keep Reading »

Qaddafi: "Song of the Rain"

  This cartoon in Arabic is about Qaddafi's speech last night in response to the Libyan people's revolution which is at its height this week. Amid rumors that he fled to Venezuela and much news that the Libyan people have secured control on many of the cities, to give a speech and claim that he is still in control, Qaddafi appeared in a jeep! He opened the door only to acknowledge that it was raining outside, so he folded back his giant umbrella and decided not to give the speech. And there was ...

Keep Reading »

The Marriage of Sexism and Islamophobia; Re-Making the News on Egypt

I find myself intermittently infuriated and nauseated by the news coverage of the sexual assault on a female CBS reporter in Tahrir Square during the celebrations the day that Husni Mubarak resigned. This coverage has ranged from the disappointing silence of Al-Jazeera to the blatant racism of Fox News. What actually happened that day to Lara Logan, chief foreign correspondent for 60 Minutes, is not yet known and I have no interest in speculating over the lurid details of a sexual and physical ...

Keep Reading »

What If the Egyptian Protesters Were Democrats?

Their recent upheaval would certainly have been different, perhaps dramatically different.  In the past month, the people of Egypt—inspired by the recent democratic revolution in Tunisia and preceding emergent revolutions in Libya, Algeria, Bahrain, Jordan, Yemen, and Syria—have undertaken a revolt of truly stunning proportions, one that includes men and women from all class strata, religious and ethnic origins, and ideological commitments. They managed to rid themselves of a longstanding and ...

Keep Reading »

Morocco on the Eve of the Demonstrations

“When I go out in the street, no cares about #feb20, I connect and boom, the revolution is brewing” (Qd je sors ds la rue, no one cares about #feb20, je me connecte et boom c'est la révolution qui couve). The above, tweeted yesterday in the style of much that’s being produced on the internet about the demonstrations on Sunday — a combination of text message French and English (and often transliterated Darija) — is a perfect encapsulation of the immediate situation, at least in Rabat (as I write this, ...

Keep Reading »

King Abdullah Announces a Discount for Dictators

Two Arab dictators are out of the game, but there are others. Here is a cartoon by Khalil Bendib about possible efforts to accomodate future ex-presidents.  

Keep Reading »

The Long Shadow of the 1952 Revolution

Almost exactly fifty-nine years ago, on January 26, 1952, downtown Cairo was in flames. Cinemas, department stores, and hotels were set alight by rioters in the streets. The identity of these rioters would become the focus of enormous speculation: Were they revolutionaries who sought the expulsion of British colonial rule from Egypt, or rather, were they counterrevolutionary forces who were giving the then-Egyptian regime or the army a pretext to intervene? Whatever the case, within a matter of six ...

Keep Reading »

Imperial Feminism, Islamophobia, and the Egyptian Revolution

". . . I’m making this video to give you one simply message: We want to go down to Tahrir Square on January 25. If we still have honor and want to live with dignity on this land, we have to go down on January 25. We’ll go down and demand our rights, our fundamental human rights...The entire government is corrupt—a corrupt president and a corrupt security force…If you stay home, you deserve what will happen to you…and you’ll be guilty, before your nation and your people…Go down ...

Keep Reading »
Page 62 of 63     « First   ...   57   58   59   60   61   62   63   Last »

Announcements

Popular Now: Critical Readings in Political Economy: 1967


 The 1967 Defeat and the Conditions of the Now: A Roundtable

SUBSCRIBE TO ARAB STUDIES JOURNAL

OIL Ad


About Culture
Jadaliyya’s Culture page is an open space for creative, original and creative texts about culture(s). Jadaliyya understanding of culture encompasses the production and dissemination of meanings in all sites, contexts and in a variety of media and genres.

Pages/Sections

Archive