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Latest Posts on Jadaliyya

تأملات في الجمالية والخطاب والتفاحة

يعزو البعض تأثير البروباغندا باعتبارها تمظهرًا خطابيًا لمفهوم "الجمالية" إلى تخوم القرنين الثامن والتاسع عشر، تلك المرحلة المركبة، إذ كانت الثورة الفرنسية (1789 – 1794) هي التي شكلت ملامحها الرئيسية لما كان للطباعة من أثر رئيس في ذلك التعبير المادي عن فكرة الحرية، أما بالنسبة لإنجلترا فكان ثمة أهمية خاصة للإنقلاب الصناعي الذي أحل الآلة محل الإنسان واتجه إلى الاستغناء عن الإنسان لعدم الحاجة إليه، ولم يكن ذلك الإحساس موجودًا في فرنسا التي سعت إلى تغيير العالم وظلت على امتداد عشرين عامًا لا تفكر وتكتب بمقدار ما كانت "تعمل". فبعد عصر "التفكير و التأمل" أدركت ...

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Syria Media Roundup (September 2)

[This is a roundup of news articles and other materials circulating on Syria and reflects a wide variety of opinions. It does not reflect the views of the Syria Page Editors or of Jadaliyya. You may send your own recommendations for inclusion in each week's roundup to syria@jadaliyya.com by Monday night of every week.] Inside Syria Syrian students leave besieged areas to take exams Syrian students and their education have suffered due to the crisis in besieged towns near Damascus.  Their educational future remains uncertain as this crisis continues.    Stealing Syria’s ...

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Arabian Peninsula Media Roundup (September 2)

[This is a roundup of news articles and other materials circulating on the Arabian Peninsula and reflects a wide variety of opinions. It does not reflect the views of the Arabian Peninsula Page Editors or of Jadaliyya. You may send your own recommendations for inclusion in each week's roundup to ap@jadaliyya.com by Monday night of every week.]  Regional and International Relations You Can't Understand ISIS If You Don't Know the History of Wahhabism in Saudi Arabia Alastair Crooke argues that the rise of the Islamic State in Iraq and Greater Syria needs to be understood in light of ...

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September Culture Bouquet

Almost a decade ago, Saadi Youssef began his poem "Imru' al-Qays' Grandson" by asking: "Is it your fault that once you were born in that country? / Three quarters of a century / and you still pay from your ebbing blood / its tax." He ended the poem with an even more vexing question: "What is it to you / now when you are asked to do the impossible?" As this long hot summer ends, we would not be mistaken to imagine these lines could be about Gaza, Mosul, or Ferguson. Maymanah Farhat contributes a recent essay from a monograph on Syrian painter Khaled ...

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Khaled Takreti: Modern Life

Syrian artist Khaled Takreti has spent the greater part of his twenty-year career exploring a personal history that stretches between Beirut, where he was born in 1964; Damascus, where he lived before moving to the United States in his early thirties; and Paris, where he has resided since 2004. The episodic nature of the painter’s oeuvre dates back to the 1990s, when he began to address self-reflexive themes through autobiographical composites. The culled figures of his canvases are based on his family and friends, and often include self-portraits; otherwise, fictionalized moments allude to ...

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Samih al-Qasim: I Will Engrave Our Names on the Wind

[While well-known as a poet, the late Samih al-Qasim was also a talented essayist, writing regularly in the Arabic-language press of Palestine/Israel. He was also a remarkable public speaker and letter writer. Over a period of two years—from May 1986 to May 1988—al-Qasim exchanged a series of extraordinary letters with Mahmoud Darwish. The letters are monuments to poetry and language and also friendship and love and, not surprisingly considering the authors, contain some of the most moving discussions of home and exile in the Arabic language. Published as a series of "packets," ...

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Samih al-Qasim: The Last Train

[The late Palestinian poet, Samih al-Qasim, was also a talented essayist, writing regularly in the Arabic-language press of Palestine/Israel. He was also a compelling orator and correspondent. The collection of his letters with Mahmoud Darwish is a uniquely great accomplishment of modern epistolary literature. Al-Qasim's correspondence with Rashid Hussein is slim by comparison, yet this 1990 "letter"—addressed on the thirteenth anniversary of Hussein's tragic death—stands out.] Rashid, my brother — Believe it or not, but after all this time separated from one another, you may find ...

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Samih al-Qasim: Two Poems

  1. “RAFAH’S CHILDREN” (1971) To the one who digs his path through the wounds of millions To he whose tanks crush all the roses in the garden Who breaks windows in the night Who sets fire to a garden and museum and sings of freedom. Who stomps on songbirds in the public square. Whose planes drop bombs on childhood’s dream. Who smashes rainbows in the sky.   Tonight, the children of the impossible roots have an announcement for you, Tonight, the children of Rafah say: “We have never woven hair braids into coverlets. We have never spat on corpses, nor yanked their gold ...

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Jadeo

Jadaliyya's new Jadeo page features audio-visual material (including videos, interviews, and photo-essays) that appeared on the site. Let us know what you'd like to "see" or "hear" on Jadeo, beyond text and posts. Email us at info@jadaliyya.com

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