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The Pedagogy Section

Latest Pedagogy Posts

New Texts Out Now: Muriam Haleh Davis, The Afterlives of the Algerian Revolution

Muriam Haleh Davis, editor, The Afterlives of the Algerian Revolution. Special Issue of JadMag (June 2014). Jadaliyya (J): What made you create this pedagogical publication? Muriam Haleh Davis (MHD): In November 2013, Samuel Everett and Malika Rahal had organized a panel for the Middle Eastern Studies Association (MESA) annual conference in New Orleans. First, all of the papers were given by a group of colleagues who I had met in Algiers during an intensive Algerian Arabic class, and whose work I had long admired. Learning Arabic (especially dialect) is still a ...

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Turkey Media Roundup (July 29)

Presidential Elections PM Erdoğan Dragging Turkey into Sectarian Fights: Kılıçdaroğlu (1)-(2)-(3)-(4)-(5) Murat Yetkin analyzes the presidential candidacies of Erdoğan, İhsanoğlu, and Demirtaş.   Erdoğan May Become President But Next Prime Minister Unclear Semih İdiz reports that uncertainty over who will succeed Erdoğan has caused disquiet in the AKP's ranks. The AK Party, the Constitution, and the Presidential Election Etyen Mahçupyan refutes the assertion that the AKP does not want a new constitution and it will pass a new constitution only to implement the presidential system. If ...

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New Texts Out Now: Mohammad Ali Kadivar, Alliances and Perception Profiles in the Iranian Reform Movement, 1997 to 2005

Mohammad Ali Kadivar, “Alliances and Perception Profiles in the Iranian Reform Movement, 1997 to 2005.” American Sociological Review 78 (December 2013). Jadaliyya (J): What made you write this article? Mohammad Ali Kadivar (MAK): I actually grew up with the Iranian Reform Movement. The beginning of the movement in 1997 was also the start of my politicization. I was in high school during the first four years. I remember how excited we all were about the changes taking place in the country, such as Khatami’s election as president, and all the reformist presses that were publishing after ...

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Al-Diwan Roundup: News and Analysis in Publishing and Academia from the Arab World

Al-Diwan brings you the latest news and analysis in publishing, academia, pedagogy, and knowledge production from across the Arab world.   What History Books for Children in Palestinian Camps? By Rosemary Sayigh (Jadaliyya) “The Palestinians might be said to stand in deep need of self-knowledge and cultural unity in this, the longest and most arduous of struggles against colonialist dispossession, yet because of external political pressures and educational fragmentation they lack this basic tool for reproducing a threatened ‘peoplehood,’” writes Rosemary Sayigh. Gaza’s ...

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New Texts Out Now: Sheila Carapico, Political Aid and Arab Activism: Democracy Promotion, Justice, and Representation

Sheila Carapico, Political Aid and Arab Activism: Democracy Promotion, Justice, and Representation. Cambridge and New York: Cambridge University Press, 2013. Jadaliyya (J): What made you write this book? Sheila Carapico (SC): After the Cold War, European and American professional democracy brokers flocked to formerly Warsaw Pact and Third World states with projects to monitor elections, promote civil society, train human rights activists, and so forth. They played a conspicuous, indispensable role in establishing the Palestinian Authority, and were increasingly visible in several Arab ...

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Do Not Compel Me to Sing

I Left My Shoes in Istanbul, directed by Nigol Bezjian. Lebanon/Turkey, 2013. Nigol Bezjian’s I Left My Shoes in Istanbul begins with its protagonist protesting that he has no desire to go on the journey that lies at the heart of the film. It ends with the haunting voice of a singer, begging the listener, “Do not implore me, I will not sing.” Between these two attempts to escape from a story that nevertheless must be told, Bezjian presents us with a vision that is deeply personal, not always coherent, but remarkably unsparing in documenting the presence of an enforced Armenian absence in ...

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New Texts Out Now: Melani Cammett, Compassionate Communalism: Welfare and Sectarianism in Lebanon

Melani Cammett, Compassionate Communalism: Welfare and Sectarianism in Lebanon. Ithaca: Cornell University Press, 2014. Jadaliyya (J): What made you write this book? Melani Cammett (MC): The aftermath of the US invasion of Iraq first got me thinking about the connections between identity politics and social service provision. Years of war with Iran as well as more than a decade of sanctions after the First Gulf War had eroded the public welfare infrastructure in Iraq. The dismantling of the state in the aftermath of the US invasion destroyed much of what was left of it, creating a vacuum in ...

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Ahmet Hamdi Tanpinar in Translation

Ahmet Hamdi Tanpınar, The Time Regulation Institute, translated by Maureen Freely and Alexander Dawe, introduction by Pankaj Mishra. New York: Penguin, 2014.   The verbal text is jealous of its linguistic signature but impatient of national identity. Translation flourishes by virtue of that paradox.  — Gayatri Chakravorty Spivak, “Translation as Culture” 1. Traveling Tanpınar 2014 marks the appearance of a second English translation of one of the funniest satirical novels of the twentieth century. Serialized from June to September 1954 in the newspaper Yeni Istanbul (New ...

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Turkey Media Roundup (July 8)

[This is a roundup of news articles and other materials circulating on Turkey and reflects a wide variety of opinions. It does not reflect the views of the Turkey Page Editors or of Jadaliyya. You may send your own recommendations for inclusion in each week's roundup to turkey@jadaliyya.com by Sunday night of every week.] Presidential Elections HDP Announces Demirtaş as Presidential Candidate On 30 June, The Peoples’ Democratic Party (HDP) announced Selahattin Demirtaş as its candidate for the upcoming presidential elections. Erdoğan Declares His Presidential Candidacy (1)-(2) On 1 July, ...

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New Texts Out Now: Pascal Menoret, Joyriding in Riyadh: Oil, Urbanism, and Revolt

Pascal Menoret, Joyriding in Riyadh: Oil, Urbanism, and Revolt. Cambridge and New York: Cambridge University Press, 2014. Jadaliyya (J): What made you write this book? Pascal Menoret (PM): I started working on the urbanization of Riyadh in 2001. I initially came to the city to teach French as a second language, and I was blown away by the place. With its single-family houses, its endless grid of avenues, and its absolute reliance on cars, the landscape of Riyadh looked very American to me. Yet it was a Greek urbanist, Constantinos Doxiadis, who designed the city, and a French company, SCET ...

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Turkey Media Roundup (July 1)

[This is a roundup of news articles and other materials circulating on Turkey and reflects a wide variety of opinions. It does not reflect the views of the Turkey Page Editors or of Jadaliyya. You may send your own recommendations for inclusion in each week's roundup to turkey@jadaliyya.com by Sunday night of every week.] English Presidential Elections, AKP, and Democracy Erdoğan Seems Decided to Replace Gül Murat Yetkin reports that there is an undisclosed poll, allegedly showing more than fifty-two percent of popular support for Erdoğan to become a presidential candidate. On the Way to ...

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Announcing Arab Studies Journal Vol. XXII: Cultures of Resistance

Editors’ Note In “Cultures of Resistance in Palestine and Beyond: The Politics of Art, Aesthetics, and Affect,” Sophie Richter-Devroe and Ruba Salih introduce the imperatives, questions, and ideas that inspired the special issue we are featuring here. Encompassing a broad array of approaches, methodologies, and perspectives, Rania Jawad, Adila Laïdi-Hanieh, Maha Nassar, Helga Tawil-Souri, Miriyam Aouragh, Craig Larkin, Brahim El Guabli, Hanan Toukan, and Yazid Anani each take on the relationship between cultural production and political resistance. For the Arab world and the Middle East more ...

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NEWTON Summer Reading

As we head into the summer, Jadaliyya would like to remind you of some of the most creative and groundbreaking works in Middle East studies that we have featured in our New Texts Out Now (NEWTON) page during the 2013-2014 academic year. Whether you are an instructor thinking about texts for the fall, a student doing research, or a reader making a summer reading list, you will find a wealth of interviews about and excerpts from works across a range of topics and disciplines. We have provided a list of all the NEWTONs we have published since last summer, divided into categories according to ...

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New Texts Out Now: Anthony Alessandrini, Nazan Ustundag, and Emrah Yildiz, 'Resistance Everywhere': The Gezi Protests and Dissident Visions of Turkey

Anthony Alessandrini, Nazan Üstündağ, and Emrah Yildiz, editors, “Resistance Everywhere”: The Gezi Protests and Dissident Visions of Turkey. Special issue of JadMag (February 2014). Jadaliyya (J): What made you create this pedagogical publication? Anthony Alessandrini, Nazan Üstündağ, and Emrah Yildiz (AA/NÜ/EY): On 20 June 2013, Jadaliyya launched the Turkey Page; the majority of the articles published in “Resistance Everywhere”: The Gezi Protests and Dissident Visions of Turkey were published either in the few weeks before or just after the page was launched. So in one sense, this ...

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Turkey Media Roundup (June 24)

[This is a roundup of news articles and other materials circulating on Turkey and reflects a wide variety of opinions. It does not reflect the views of the Turkey Page Editors or of Jadaliyya. You may send your own recommendations for inclusion in each week's roundup to turkey@jadaliyya.com by Sunday night of every week.] English Rise of ISIS and Possible Role of Kurds in the Region For Turkey, No News from Mosul is Good News Turkish courts banned reporting about the hostage crisis in Mosul, Cengiz Çandar reports. Turkey Avoids Claims of "Hostage" Crisis in Iraq According to ...

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Eksik kalmis hayatlarin kelimeleri: Keske Bir Opup Koklasaydim

Eksik kalmış hayatların kelimeleri: Keşke Bir Öpüp Koklasaydım “Geleceğe dair umutluyum, kitabı da bu umutla yazdık” 12 Eylül 1980 askeri darbesi, Türkiye’de toplumsal ve iktisadi yapıyı köklü biçimde değiştirmesinin yanında son otuz senedir yaşananların anlamlandırılmasında sıkça referans verilen bir olay/an olması nedeniyle de şüphesiz Türkiye tarihinin milatlarından biridir. Resmi rakamlara göre 1 milyon 683 bin kişinin fişlendiği, 230 bin kişinin yargılandığı, 7 bin kişi için idam cezası istendiği, 517 kişiye idam cezası verildiği, 4 bini öğretmen ve akademisyen olan toplam 40 bin ...

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New JADMAG: The Afterlives of the Algerian Revolution

The Afterlives of the Algerian Revolution  Edited by Muriam Haleh Davis  E-version: $3.49 Paperback: $5.99 Combo: $7.99   In July 2012, Algeria celebrated its 50th anniversary of independence, which signaled the victory of the FLN (National Liberation Front) over the French army. Despite five decades of Algerian independence, much of the work done on Algeria continues to focus on the colonial period. This pedagogical publication seeks to interrogate Algerian history since 1962 and considers how the revolution unleashed multiple socio-political dynamics that ...

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New Texts Out Now: Linda Herrera, Wired Citizenship: Youth Learning and Activism in the Middle East

Linda Herrera, editor (with Rehab Sakr), Wired Citizenship: Youth Learning and Activism in the Middle East. London and New York: Routledge, 2014. Jadaliyya (J): What made you put together this book? Linda Herrera (LH): The idea for this book began during the workshop, “Youth and Citizenship in a Digital Era” of the Thirteenth Mediterranean Research Meeting of the Robert Schumann Center for Advanced Studies at the European University Institute. During three days of lively and often impassioned discussions, I knew that we had valuable and unique material from a highly engaged community of ...

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Turkey Media Roundup (June 17)

[This is a roundup of news articles and other materials circulating on Turkey and reflects a wide variety of opinions. It does not reflect the views of the Turkey Page Editors or of Jadaliyya. You may send your own recommendations for inclusion in each week's roundup to turkey@jadaliyya.com by Sunday night of every week.] English Fall of Mosul and Turkey’s Hostage Crisis Sunni Radicals Seize Turkey's Mosul Consulate Turkey’s Mosul consulate has been seized by the Islamic State of Iraq and al-Sham and all its personnel have been kidnapped, Tülin Daloğlu reports. Turkey Ignored Direct ...

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New Texts Out Now: Ahmed El Shamsy, The Canonization of Islamic Law: A Social and Intellectual History

Ahmed El Shamsy, The Canonization of Islamic Law: A Social and Intellectual History. Cambridge and New York: Cambridge University Press, 2013. Jadaliyya (J): What made you write this book? Ahmed El Shamsy (AES): Legal history is often dry stuff: it is full of theories, concepts, and institutions, and heavy with jargon. When I read a work of history, I want to know what happened. I also want to understand what drove the actors involved and what was at stake. The story of the birth of Islamic law, like any story, is about people: their motivations, concerns, and interactions. Accordingly, I ...

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Turkey Media Roundup (June 10)

[This is a roundup of news articles and other materials circulating on Turkey and reflects a wide variety of opinions. It does not reflect the views of the Turkey Page Editors or of Jadaliyya. You may send your own recommendations for inclusion in each week's roundup to turkey@jadaliyya.com by Sunday night of every week.] English Kurdish Question and Peace Process Öcalan: In the Next Two or Three Weeks There will Be Important Talks Abdullah Öcalan stated that there would be significant developments in the peace process in the coming period. Reviving the Kurdish Peace Process Hatem Ete ...

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New Texts Out Now: Gulcin Erdi-Lelandais, Understanding the City: Henri Lefebvre and Urban Studies

Gülçin Erdi-Lelandais, editor, Understanding the City: Henri Lefebvre and Urban Studies. Cambridge: Cambridge Scholars Publishing, 2014. Jadaliyya (J): What made you write this book? Gulçin Lelandais (GL): The idea of this book was born during a panel session on Henri Lefebvre at the 2011 Congress of the European Sociological Association, during which researchers from Hungary, the UK, France, and Turkey presented their approaches on Lefebvrian concepts like the right to the city, rhythmanalysis, and the production of space in their empirical research. Since I was working on ...

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Afterthoughts on Piketty’s Capital

By David Harvey Thomas Piketty has written a book called Capital that has caused quite a stir. He advocates progressive taxation and a global wealth tax as the only way to counter the trend towards the creation of a “patrimonial” form of capitalism marked by what he dubs “terrifying” inequalities of wealth and income. He also documents in excruciating and hard to rebut detail how social inequality of both wealth and income has evolved over the last two centuries, with particular emphasis on the role of wealth. He demolishes the widely-held view that free market capitalism spreads ...

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Turkey Media Roundup (June 3)

[This is a roundup of news articles and other materials circulating on Turkey and reflects a wide variety of opinions. It does not reflect the views of the Turkey Page Editors or of Jadaliyya. You may send your own recommendations for inclusion in each week's roundup to turkey@jadaliyya.com by Sunday night of every week.] English Anniversary of the Gezi Uprising As It Happened: Police Leave Protesters Bloodied and Bruised on Gezi Anniversary A detailed report on the one-year anniversary of the Gezi uprising. A Year After the Protests, Gezi Park Nurtures the Seeds of a New Turkey Constanze ...

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New Texts Out Now: Kimberly Wedeven Segall, Performing Democracy in Iraq and South Africa

Kimberly Wedeven Segall, Performing Democracy in Iraq and South Africa: Gender, Media, and Resistance. Syracuse: Syracuse University Press, 2013. Jadaliyya (J): What made you write this book? Kimberly Wedeven Segall (KWS): The origins of this book began twenty years ago, when I lived for a year in northern Iraq, recording the stories of Kurdish guerrilla fighters and female survivors of the Al-Anfal, while living in Shaqlawa. Many survivors spoke of the role of song, communal dances, and poetry as part of their pathway to cope with their traumatized past, to persevere, to form collective ...

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Turkey Media Roundup (May 27)

[This is a roundup of news articles and other materials circulating on Turkey and reflects a wide variety of opinions. It does not reflect the views of the Turkey Page Editors or of Jadaliyya. You may send your own recommendations for inclusion in each week's roundup to turkey@jadaliyya.com by Sunday night of every week.] English Soma Mine Massacre Soma: Deconstructing the Tragedy in Turkey (Podcast) A conversation with Alex Christie-Miller about the appalling conditions of Soma mines and Erdoğan’s disastrous way of dealing with the disaster. After Mine Disaster, a Painful Awareness of ...

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Miners and the Ottoman State: Ryan Gingeras Interviews Donald Quataert

With the official death toll having exceeded three hundred, the Soma mining disaster has raised new questions about the conditions and rights of laborers in Turkey. Amidst the darkly farcical internet circus surrounding the rescue efforts, public outcry, and official reaction to this catastrophe, one of the more surreal moments has been the Prime Minister’s citation of nineteenth-century mining disasters as examples of the natural and inevitable nature of mining accidents in general. This statement, which was widely interpreted as a sign of flagrant insensitivity and indifference, also ...

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New Texts Out Now: Andrea Khalil, Women, Gender, and the Arab Spring

Andrea Khalil, editor, Women, Gender, and the Arab Spring, special issue of The Journal of North African Studies 19.2 (2014). Forthcoming as a book with Routledge. Jadaliyya (J): What made you put together this special issue?  Andrea Khalil (AK): During my fieldwork in Tunisia (2011-13) working on a book, I was sensitized to the profound problems that women in Tunisia were facing since the Revolution, and more generally, the urgency to address gender issues and activism in the new context. The book I was working on at that time was not specifically about gender dynamics, but I wound up ...

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الإيروس في تحولاته: من عصر الحب إلى عصر الاستهلاك

ناظم مهنا* الإيروس في كل مكان: درجت العادة أن يخوض في هذا الميدان، المتخصصون والمحللون الأكاديميون! وبما أن المسألة تخصنا جميعاً، أقدم، بتردد، بعض الإشارات والآراء، على ضوء التجربة والتأمل وبعض القراءات. عندما يبدأ الإنسان باكتشاف جسده، في سن مبكرة من الطفولة، تبدأ المحرمات والقيود بأشكال مختلفة! وفي هذه الحلكة، تتكون فينا ذوات سريّة، تجعلنا نسترق النظر، نتلصص، لاقتناص لحظة الاختبار! ثمّ ،لا يلبث أن يستفيق الآباء، والأبناء متلبسين بالشبهة، ثم يستفيق المعلمون، والمشايخ، وتبدأ آلية الرقابة، ليقدم الأبناء في نهاية المطاف، للمجتمع، كائنات متكيفة، خجولة، مطواعة..   إن الطبيعة تقدم ...

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Turkey Media Roundup (May 20)

[This is a roundup of news articles and other materials circulating on Turkey and reflects a wide variety of opinions. It does not reflect the views of the Turkey Page Editors or of Jadaliyya. You may send your own recommendations for inclusion in each week's roundup to turkey@jadaliyya.com by Sunday night of every week.] English Soma Mine Disaster Deadly Fire Roars Through Coal Mine in Turkey (1)-(2) “Public’s outrage over mine disaster casts harsh light on Turkey’s premier,” Tim Arango, Kareem Fahim, and Şebnem Arsu report. Turkey’s Neoliberal Death Toll: Hundreds of Miners Died in ...

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New Texts Out Now: Sunaina Maira and Piya Chatterjee, The Imperial University: Academic Repression and Scholarly Dissent

Sunaina Maira and Piya Chatterjee, editors, The Imperial University: Academic Repression and Scholarly Dissent. Minneapolis: University of Minnesota Press, 2014. Jadaliyya (J): What made you write this book? Sunaina Maira and Piya Chatterjee (SM and PC): One of the experiences that propelled this book most immediately for us was a letter we co-authored in solidarity with women targeted by the US War on Terror. We circulated this as a petition that garnered national and global support. This generated a conversation between us about how to transform this petition into a project of solidarity, ...

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Turkey Media Roundup (May 13)

[This is a roundup of news articles and other materials circulating on Turkey and reflects a wide variety of opinions. It does not reflect the views of the Turkey Page Editors or of Jadaliyya. You may send your own recommendations for inclusion in each week's roundup to turkey@jadaliyya.com by Sunday night of every week.] English Freedom of the Press and Democracy Freedom of Press Cannot Be Sacrificed to Ideological Debate İsmet Berkan points out that “we are again ideologically split into two with the latest press freedom report from Freedom House.” State Department Rejects ...

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أخبار ثقافية

مجمع اللغة العربية وعداؤه للتعريب قال علي القاسمي في مقال نُشر في "القدس العربي" إنّ معركة ضارية نشبت في المؤتمر السنوي الثمانين للمجمع في القاهرة بينأنصار التعريب ومناهضيه. فقد أطلق الشاعر الكبير فاروق شوشة، الأمين العام للمجمع الشرارة الأولى في الجلسة الافتتاحية للمؤتمرالتي حضرها جميع رؤساء المجامع العربية ومدير مكتب تنسيق التعريب بالرباط و الأعضاء وجمع غفير من المثقفين، إذ انتقد بشدة موقف لجنة الطب في المجلس الأعلى للجامعات المصرية التي أوصتبعدم تعليم الطب بالعربية، ووصفه بأنه موقفٌ  سلبي مخالف للدستور و للأنظمة التي تجعل من المجمع الجهة المسؤولة عن القضايا اللغوية، ومغفِلٌ ...

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NEWTONs You May Have Missed

With the spring semester coming to an end, we wanted to take an opportunity to remind you of some of the amazing NEWTON posts we have posted since January that you might have missed the first time around—especially those of you starting to think about your summer reading list. If you wish to recommend a book or peer-reviewed article for a feature in NEWTON, please email us at reviews@jadaliyya.com. Niki Akhavan, Electronic Iran: The Cultural Politics of an Online Evolution Zayde Antrim, Routes and Realms: The Power of Place in the Early Islamic World Claire Beaugrand, Amélie Le Renard, ...

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Turkey Media Roundup (May 6)

[This is a roundup of news articles and other materials circulating on Turkey and reflects a wide variety of opinions. It does not reflect the views of the Turkey Page Editors or of Jadaliyya. You may send your own recommendations for inclusion in each week's roundup to turkey@jadaliyya.com by Sunday night of every week.] English "New Turkey" and "Will of the Nation" Freedom of the Press 2014 Turkey is relegated to the league of “not free” countries, according to this report from Freedom House. Turkey's Erdoğan: One of the World's Most Determined Internet Censors Joe ...

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Introducing Al-Diwan

Tadween Publishing’s blog is transforming into Al-Diwan. The move attempts to capture the spirit of a shift towards creating an open space for discussion.
 The name Al-Diwan was chosen because of its flexible meaning, which is left open for interpretation. In both Persian and Arabic, diwan may represent a collection of poetry or prose.  Egyptian poet Ibrahim al-Mazini once defined the meaning of diwan as a collection of poetry in which people “write down what wells up in their minds in their happiest hours—and what makes man hover over life, forcing him to feel what he has seen, to see ...

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الديوان

صار اسم مدونة تدوين للنشر "الديوان". وتهدف هذه الحركة إلى التعبيرعن روح الانتقال إلى إنشاء فضاء مفتوح للنقاش. وقد اختير اسم "الديوان" بسبب معناه المرن، المفتوح على التفسير. ففي كلٍّ من الفارسية و العربية، يمكن أن تعني كلمة ديوان مجموعة من الأشعار أو الكلام المنثور. وقد عرّف الشاعر المصري إبراهيم المازني الديوان بأنه مجموعة من الأشعار التي يقوم فيها الناس "بتدوين ما يخطر في أذهانهم في ذروة سعادتهم، وما يجعل الإنسان يحلق فوق الحياة، ويجبره على أن يحسّ بما رآه، ويتخيّل ما عرفه، ويعرف ما تخيّله". لكنّ معنى الديوان لا يقتصر على الشعر أو الآداب لوحدها. ففي تفسير آخر ...

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New Texts Out Now: Mark LeVine, The Arab Uprisings of 2011 (Special Issue of Middle East Critique)

Mark LeVine, editor, The Arab Uprisings of 2011, special issue of Middle East Critique 22.3 (December 2013). Jadaliyya (J): What made you put together this special issue?        Mark LeVine (ML): The issue emerged out of a conference we organized around the first anniversary of the Arab uprisings, held at the Center for Middle Eastern Studies at Lund University. The conference was titled “The Arab Uprisings: Contesting Narratives, Locating Power,” and was co-sponsored by the CMES at Lund, Jadaliyya, and the journal Middle East Critique. Many of us on the ...

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Turkey Media Roundup (April 29)

[This is a roundup of news articles and other materials circulating on Turkey and reflects a wide variety of opinions. It does not reflect the views of the Turkey Page Editors or of Jadaliyya. You may send your own recommendations for inclusion in each week's roundup to turkey@jadaliyya.com by Sunday night of every week.] English Prime Minister Erdoğan’s Message on Armenian Genocide On the Events of 1915 On the eve of 24 April, the day Armenians commemorate the Meds Yeghern, Turkey’s Prime Minister published an important message. The First Call for Turkish-Armenian Reconciliation It was ...

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Studying, Researching, Teaching, Representing: The Arab Uprisings Three Years On (28 April, George Mason University)

Join George Mason University and the Arab Studies Institute for a panel discussing: How has the region been studied, researched, taught, and represented in the past three years?  What have we learned about the societies, regional/international relations, and political-economic dynamics of Arab countries?  What are the salient debates in the region about the region? Have counter-revolutionary forces triumphed? Is it time to do away with the secular/Islamist binary in favor of more nuanced understandings of political organization? Beyond politics, how ...

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The Confiscation of Armenian Properties: An Interview with Umit Kurt

The following interview with Ümit Kurt tackles how the physical annihilation of the Armenians paralleled the confiscation and appropriation of their properties in 1915. By citing the various laws and decrees that orchestrated the confiscation process, Kurt places our understanding of the genocide within a legal context. Ümit Kurt is a native of Aintab, Turkey, and holds a bachelor of science degree in political science and public administration from Middle East Technical University, and a master’s degree from Sabancı University’s department of European studies. He is currently a PhD ...

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New Texts Out Now: Reinoud Leenders, Spoils of Truce: Corruption and State-Building in Postwar Lebanon

Reinoud Leenders, Spoils of Truce: Corruption and State-Building in Postwar Lebanon. Cornell: Cornell University Press, 2012. Jadaliyya (J): What made you write this book? Reinoud Leenders (RL): Since my first encounter with Lebanese politics and society in the mid-1990s, I have been fascinated with the nature and role of the state in this country. This was primarily because I became exposed to a lively array of contradictory narratives on the state when talking to ordinary Lebanese and living in and visiting the country for over a decade. On one and the same day, it was quite conceivable ...

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Turkey Media Roundup (April 22)

[This is a roundup of news articles and other materials circulating on Turkey and reflects a wide variety of opinions. It does not reflect the views of the Turkey Page Editors or of Jadaliyya. You may send your own recommendations for inclusion in each week's roundup to turkey@jadaliyya.com by Sunday night of every week.] English Constitutional Court Decision and the National Intelligence Organization Law Erdoğan vs Twitter (1)-(2) Yavuz Baydar points that the AKP government started to demonize the Constitutional Court after it issued a ruling stating that the Twitter ban was an ...

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Stasis Shift: Guernica Interviews Jadaliyya Co-Founder Bassam Haddad

Jadaliyya co-founder on telling alternative stories about the Arab world, understanding the life cycles of revolution, and confronting “the weight of ancient problems.”   In the fall of 2010, I was crossing a crowded hotel lobby at the Middle East Studies Association convention in San Diego when a friend introduced me to the writer, editor, and scholar Bassam Haddad. “Bassam is starting a website,” she said. “You should know each other.” He slipped me a business card with the word Jadaliyya (Arabic for “dialectic”) on it. “There isn’t much online yet,” Haddad explained. “We just ...

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On Not Despising the Present: Some Notes on Faris Giacaman’s 'The Sadness of Post-Militance'

A Brechtian maxim: “Don’t start from the good old things but the bad new ones.” — Walter Benjamin, “Conversations with Brecht”[1] You have no right to despise the present. — Charles Baudelaire, quoted in Michel Foucault, “What Is Enlightenment?”[2] I was quite moved by Faris Giacaman’s recent article “The Sadness of Post-Militance: Some Reflections on Brown University’s ‘New Directions in Palestine Studies’ Conference.” For a young scholar to call into question the direction of Palestine Studies, focusing on a conference featuring some of the most prominent names in the field, takes no ...

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New Texts Out Now: Valeska Huber, Channelling Mobilities: Migration and Globalisation in the Suez Canal Region and Beyond

Valeska Huber, Channelling Mobilities: Migration and Globalisation in the Suez Canal Region and Beyond. Cambridge and New York: Cambridge University Press, 2013. Jadaliyya (J): What made you write this book? Valeska Huber (VH): The origins of this book lie in my general interest in the history of mobility, particularly as it connects to justice and equality. Does globalization—in the present day or historically—mean that everyone can move at an ever-quicker pace? I wanted to unpack this story for the period around 1900 by showing that of course not everyone travels with the same speed; ...

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Turkey Media Roundup (April 15)

[This is a roundup of news articles and other materials circulating on Turkey and reflects a wide variety of opinions. It does not reflect the views of the Turkey Page Editors or of Jadaliyya. You may send your own recommendations for inclusion in each week's roundup to turkey@jadaliyya.com by Sunday night of every week.] English Elections’ Aftershocks and Constitutional Court’s Judgements Erdoğan's Missed Opportunity to Mix Islam and Democracy in Turkey “By winning the elections, Erdoğan appears to have won the battle for the moment,” writes Alexander Christie-Miller. Five Reasons To Be ...

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ماذا فعلت «حماس» بالمناهج؟

بعد عقود قضوها مشتتين بين المناهج العربيِّة، كان قد أصبح للفلسطينيين في مطلع الألفيّة الجديدة منهاجهم التعليميّ الخاص والموحَّد في الضفة الغربيّة وقطاع غزّة. في حينه، لم تعجب المناهج الجديدة «أميركا» و«إسرائيل» اللتان اتهمتا السلطة الفلسطينيِّة بأنِّ تلك المناهج تحرِّض على العنف، وأنّها لا تتضمّن مبادئ السلام والمصالحة ولا تشير إلى وجود «إسرائيل» على الخريطة. كان الرئيس عبّاس قد تطرَّق إلى ذلك في خطابه في شباط/ فبراير الفائت أمام طلبة إسرائيليين في مقره في «المقاطعة»، وتعهّد بالعمل على تغيير ما لم يرق عبر لجنة فلسطينية ـ أميركيّة ـ إسرائيليّة. يتّفق طرفا المعادلة الفلسطينيّة البائسة في غزّة ...

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New Texts Out Now: Leila Piran, Institutional Change in Turkey: The Impact of European Union Reforms on Human Rights and Policy

Leila Piran, Institutional Change in Turkey: The Impact of European Union Reforms on Human Rights and Policy (New York: Palgrave, 2013). Jadaliyya (J): What made you write this book? Leila Piran (LP): I wanted to write about democratization and political reform in a Muslim-majority country. Turkey represents a noteworthy example because of the rich history of reforms, ranging from Ottoman reforms aimed at modernization of the Empire to the ongoing Republican reforms starting in 1923. In general, police reform is one of the most challenging projects for any country to undertake, ...

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Turkey Media Roundup (April 8)

[This is a roundup of news articles and other materials circulating on Turkey and reflects a wide variety of opinions. It does not reflect the views of the Turkey Page Editors or of Jadaliyya. You may send your own recommendations for inclusion in each week's roundup to turkey@jadaliyya.com by Sunday night of every week.] English Local Elections Who Won and Who Lost in Figures Sedat Ergin analyzes the election statistics. Turkish PM Erdoğan's Post-Election "Balcony Speech" Erdoğan’s speech from the party headquater’s balcony after elections. Erdoğan: Political Enemies Will ...

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The Sadness of Post-Militance: Some Reflections on Brown University’s 'New Directions in Palestine Studies' Conference

In late February, just about anyone who ever wrote anything about the political economy of Palestine and the Palestinians descended upon Providence, Rhode Island. They were there to attend Brown University’s much-anticipated conference organized by Beshara Doumani, “New Directions in Palestine Studies: Political Economy and the Economy of the Political.” As a person who has just started in the field, the experience was more than a little surreal. Most of the authors who I have spent most of my time as a student reading were quite literally packed into one room. This is a series of scattered ...

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New Texts Out Now: Zayde Antrim, Routes and Realms: The Power of Place in the Early Islamic World

Zayde Antrim, Routes and Realms: The Power of Place in the Early Islamic World. New York and Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2012. Jadaliyya (J): What made you write this book? Zayde Antrim (ZA): I was originally motivated by what I saw as easy dismissals of the relationship between Palestinians and the territory that now makes up Israel, the West Bank, and the Gaza Strip. When the question of their attachment to land came up, it was often in order to deem it both recent and ideologically motivated, sometimes explicitly in comparison to the more historically legitimate or “natural” ...

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Foucault, Fanon, Intellectuals, Revolutions

[This article is the final in a three-part Jadaliyya series that looks at Foucault's work in relationship to the legacy of French colonialism in North Africa. Read the first and second installments here: "The Dangers of Liberalism: Foucault and Postcoloniality in France" by Diren Valayden and "Justifications of Power": Neoliberalism and the Role of Empire by Muriam Haleh Davis.] My theoretical ethic is…“antistrategic”: to be respectful when a singularity revolts, intransigent as soon as power violates the universal. A simple choice, ...

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Turkey Media Roundup (April 1)

[This is a roundup of news articles and other materials circulating on Turkey and reflects a wide variety of opinions. It does not reflect the views of the Turkey Page Editors or of Jadaliyya. You may send your own recommendations for inclusion in each week's roundup to turkey@jadaliyya.com by Sunday night of every week.] English Graft Crisis, Ban on Twitter/YouTube, and Local Elections The Battle for Turkey’s Future (1)-(2) The Economist writes that “An increasingly autocratic prime minister is losing touch with voters and damaging his country.” Turkey’s Prime Minister Acts Desperately ...

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Conference: Reason and Esotericism in Shi'i Islam (April 4, University of Chicago)

The University of Chicago Shi'i Studies Group presents A Shi'i Studies Symposium: "Reason an Esotericism in Shi'i Islam" 4 April 2014, 8.45am - 6:00pm Coulter Lounge, International House, 1414 East 59th Street, Chicago, IL Hermeneutics, Law, Theology, Heresiography, Epistemology, Politics, and Anthropology Speakers: Tahera Qutbuddin  Paul Walker Hassan Ansari  Bella Tendler Ed Hayes Rodrigo Adem Mushegh Asatryan George Warner Ata Anzali  Sajjad Rizvi Matt Melvin-Koushki Alireza Doostdar Olly ...

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New Texts Out Now: Niki Akhavan, Electronic Iran: The Cultural Politics of an Online Evolution

Niki Akhavan, Electronic Iran: The Cultural Politics of an Online Evolution. New Brunswick, NJ: Rutgers University Press, 2013. Jadaliyya (J): What made you write this book? Niki Akhavan (NA): As an early and eager participant on the Iranian Internet, I was both excited and disturbed about the kinds of content and communities that were flourishing online. I saw new connections being made across geographical and ideological borders, participants pooling resources together, experimenting in new modes of self-expression, and generally having a good time. But alongside these, I noticed ...

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Turkey Media Roundup (March 25)

[This is a roundup of news articles and other materials circulating on Turkey and reflects a wide variety of opinions. It does not reflect the views of the Turkey Page Editors or of Jadaliyya. You may send your own recommendations for inclusion in each week's roundup to turkey@jadaliyya.com by Sunday night of every week.] English Ban Over Twitter Erdoğan Lost His Twitter Battle—Very Badly Murat Yetkin points out that millions of Twitter users hit back and defied the restrictions, including President Abdullah Gül. It’s Not Twitter, It’s The Eclipse Of Reason Alternative Informatics ...

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New Texts Out Now: Rawia Bishara, Olives, Lemons & Za’atar: The Best Middle Eastern Home Cooking

Rawia Bishara, Olives, Lemons & Za’atar: The Best Middle Eastern Home Cooking. Lanham, MD: Kyle Books, 2014. Jadaliyya (J): What made you decide to write this book? Rawia Bishara (RB): Olives, Lemons & Za’atar has been a long time coming. My restaurant, Tanoreen, is now fifteen years old and I have been, in essence, testing these recipes all along. I also felt like this was the right time to contribute, as Middle Eastern food has come to the forefront and I have something to say about it. Additionally, I wanted to continue tradition. Olives, Lemons & Za’atar is a piece of ...

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Conference--The Past and the Future of the Legal Left: Celebrating Duncan Kennedy's Scholarship (London, 22 May)

The Past and the Future of the Legal Left: Celebrating Duncan Kennedy's Scholarship Thursday, May 22, 2:00pm - 7:30pm in UTC+01 Khalili Lecture Theatre, SOAS, University of London, London The School of Law at SOAS invites you to a conference that honors Professor Duncan Kennedy, one of the most influential legal theorists and left critics of our time. After teaching for more than four decades at Harvard Law School, Professor Kennedy announced his intention to retire. Kennedy’s brilliant contributions have challenged our ...

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Turkey Media Roundup (March 18)

[This is a roundup of news articles and other materials circulating on Turkey and reflects a wide variety of opinions. It does not reflect the views of the Turkey Page Editors or of Jadaliyya. You may send your own recommendations for inclusion in each week's roundup to turkey@jadaliyya.com by Sunday night of every week.] English Farewell to Berkin Fifteen-Year-Old Gezi Victim Berkin Elvan Dies After 269 Days in Coma Berkin Elvan, a teenager who has been in a coma since being hit by a police tear-gas canister during the Gezi uprising, died on 11 March. A Loaf of Bread, a Dead Child and ...

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Call for Applicants: AUB Post-Doctoral Fellowships in Public Policy and International Affairs in the Arab World

Post-Doctoral Fellowship Announcement The Issam Fares Institute for Public Policy and International Affairs (IFI) American University of Beirut Post-Doctoral Fellowships in Public Policy and International Affairs in the Arab World IFI announces the availability of two post-doctoral fellowships in public policy and international affairs at the American University of Beirut (AUB) for the a full academic year 2014-15, starting September 1, 2014 and ending May 30, 2014. IFI is specifically interested in applicants who conduct policy-based research related to one or more of the three current ...

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New Texts Out Now: India: Wounded States (Special Issue of Warscapes)

India: Wounded States. Special issue of Warscapes, edited by Bhakti Shringarpure and Aruni Kashyap. February 2014. Jadaliyya (J): What made you put together this special issue? Warscapes (W): Since the inception of Warscapes we have had a stream of submissions from India that recount experiences of military occupation and state violence in places like Assam and Kashmir. Meanwhile, if you look through the pages of most western mainstream media, as well as Indian outlets, they are projecting a completely different India—shining, burgeoning, economically booming, rapidly globalizing, and ...

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Alevis in Ottoman Anatolia: An Interview with Ayfer Karakaya-Stump

The former Ottoman world is home to many communities of Muslim religious minorities that have been variously deemed heterodox deviants from the acknowledged schools of Islamic law. Narratives about them have focused on a certain impurity or syncretism in their religious practices. One such group is the Kizilbash/Alevi community of Anatolia. From the perspective of Ottoman rulers and statesmen, Kizilbash groups were often seen as politically dangerous heretics to be stamped out, or at the very least reformed. For Protestant missionaries, they were one of many communities in the empire seen as ...

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Turkey Media Roundup (March 11)

[This is a roundup of news articles and other materials circulating on Turkey and reflects a wide variety of opinions. It does not reflect the views of the Turkey Page Editors or of Jadaliyya. You may send your own recommendations for inclusion in each week's roundup to turkey@jadaliyya.com by Sunday night of every week.] English Graft Crisis and Wire Tapping Scandals Erdoğan's Media Grab Stymies Expansion by Murdoch, Time Warner For Erdoğan, battling a barrage of leaks about corruption, the coming weeks are crucial, as Mehul Srivastava, Benjamin Harvey, and Ercan Ersoy argue. Something ...

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Panel Discussion: “Resistance Everywhere”: The Gezi Protests and Dissident Visions of Turkey (City University of New York, 14 March)

The Middle East and Middle Eastern American Center at The Graduate Center of the City University of New York presents “Resistance Everywhere”: The Gezi Protests and Dissident Visions of Turkey Friday, 14 March 2014 6:30-8:30pm Room C-198, The CUNY Graduate Center, 365 Fifth Avenue at 34th Street, New York, NY 10016 Co-Sponsored by the Committee on Globalization and Social Change; the Center for Place, Culture, and Politics; Jadaliyya E-Zine; the Narrating Change Seminar; and Tadween Publishing. This panel will take as its starting point a discussion of the Gezi Park protests, which ...

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Istanbul Bibliography 2000-2013

[The following bibliography was published by the French Institute of Anatolian Studies on 26 February 2014] Istanbul Bibliography 2000-2013 The 'Project' City of Istanbul: from its Construction to its Bibliography What does this bibliography on Istanbul that has been prepared at a time when the conflict between the governing party AKP and the Gülen Community has reached its climax with its special impact on the construction sector tell us? Needless to say, the increase in the textual production on the city, which is so ‘cultured’ as to be designated as the European Capital of ...

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New Texts Out Now: Annika Marlen Hinze, Turkish Berlin: Integration Policy and Urban Space

Annika Marlen Hinze, Turkish Berlin: Integration Policy and Urban Space. Minneapolis: University of Minnesota Press, 2013. Jadaliyya (J): What made you write this book? Annika Marlen Hinze (AMH): I grew up in Berlin in the 1980s, which means I grew up amidst many public debates about "foreigners" and "immigrants." Yet, as someone who was never visibly different in any way, I never really considered how central the immigration debate, and the situation of German Turks, is to German politics and society, until I moved to Chicago. This move changed me profoundly. I ...

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The (Ir)relevance of Academia? Academics Lash Back at Kristof for NYT Column

Has academia become a wasteland of intelligence? This is not the first time such an argument has been brought to light. A recent column by Nicholas Kristof in the New York Times titled “Professors, We Need You!” has attracted a significant amount of attention from across the web over his argument that professors and the work they produce are becoming closed off from reality and do not have the practical impact they should. Kristof points a lot of fingers in his op-ed, which has resulted in a lot of fingers pointing back at him. From claiming that professors have ...

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Turkey Media Roundup (March 4)

[This is a roundup of news articles and other materials circulating on Turkey and reflects a wide variety of opinions. It does not reflect the views of the Turkey Page Editors or of Jadaliyya. You may send your own recommendations for inclusion in each week's roundup to turkey@jadaliyya.com by Sunday night of every week.] English Wiretapping Scandals  "Son, Get Rid of the Money" Turkey is shaking with the leaked voice recording alleged to be of Prime Minister Recep Tayyip Erdoğan and his son, Bilal Erdoğan. Erdoğan Recordings Appear Real, Analyst Says, As Turkey Scandal ...

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Job Opening: Specialists on Syria at the University of St Andrews

Inviting Applications from Specialists on Syria at the University of St. Andrews. Link to Vacancy Posting Lecturer - MR1291 Description School of International Relations, Salary: £37,756 - £46,400 per annum, Start: 1 September 2014 or as soon as possible thereafter Details The University of St Andrews is planning further substantial investment in its highly regarded School of International Relations. We therefore invite applications for several positions at the lecturer level (a senior lectureship or readership may be available for exceptional candidates) as well as a three year ...

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New Texts Out Now: John Tofik Karam, On the Trail and Trial of a Palestinian Diaspora: Mapping South America in the Arab–Israeli Conflict, 1967–1972

John Tofik Karam, "On the Trail and Trial of a Palestinian Diaspora: Mapping South America in the Arab–Israeli Conflict, 1967–1972." Journal of Latin American Studies 45.5 (November 2013). Jadaliyya (J): What made you write this article? John Tofik Karam (JTK): I didn’t set out to do the kind of research that resulted in this article. I was on leave in 2008-9, during which time I worked in some archives in Asunción, Paraguay for my current book project on Arab diasporic networks at the trinational border where Argentina, Brazil, and Paraguay meet. Gathering sources from different ...

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Turkey Media Roundup (February 25)

[This is a roundup of news articles and other materials circulating on Turkey and reflects a wide variety of opinions. It does not reflect the views of the Turkey Page Editors or of Jadaliyya. You may send your own recommendations for inclusion in each week's roundup to turkey@jadaliyya.com by Sunday night of every week.] English Graft Crisis and Authoritarianism An Orwellian Turkey? Ihsan Dağı argues that Turkey is becoming an “Orwellian state,” and that “big brother is watching, ruling, legislating, trying, rewarding, buying, selling, publishing.” Myths and Facts About Turkey's Gülen ...

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Tadween Roundup: News and Analysis in Publishing and Academia from the Arab World

News and stories with a focus on the publishing industry, education, and technology from across the Arab world. The Arab World Learning Barometer (Brookings Institute) The Center for Universal Education at Brookings has developed an interactive tool that depicts the state of education and learning in the Middle East and North Africa. A Conversation with the Head of the Association of Arab Universities By Rasha Faek (Al-Fanar Media) Al-Fanar Media interviews Secretary General of the Association of Arab Universities Sultan Abu-Orabi. Inter-University Platform for Middle East, ...

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What’s Happening in Turkey? A Roundtable with the Turkey Page Editors

Those who have followed the political scene in Turkey over the past few weeks have watched the unfolding of a number of overlapping major events. Among the breaking stories are those related to the corruption crisis, which has resulted in a significant challenge to the power of the AKP government; the open conflict between Prime Minister Recep Tayyip Erdoğan and his important former ally Fethullah Gülen; rising interest rates, which have drawn international attention; the state of relations with the EU (particularly in the wake of Erdoğan’s recent trip to Brussels); the Turkish state’s role ...

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New JADMAG: “Resistance Everywhere”: The Gezi Protests and Dissident Visions of Turkey

“Resistance Everywhere”: The Gezi Protests and Dissident Visions of Turkey Edited by Anthony Alessandrini, Nazan Üstündağ, and Emrah Yildiz Electronic copy: $6.99 Paperback: $10.99  Combo: $12.99 On 20 June 2013, Jadaliyya launched the Turkey Page. “Resistance Everywhere”: The Gezi Protests and Dissident Visions of Turkey is the culmination of Jadaliyya’s coverage of this summer’s events in Turkey. This collection focuses on the Gezi Park protests, which erupted in late May 2013 and led to ongoing nation-wide resistance in opposition to the ...

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New Texts Out Now: Kamran Matin, Recasting Iranian Modernity: International Relations and Social Change

Kamran Matin, Recasting Iranian Modernity: International Relations and Social Change. London and New York: Routledge, 2013. Jadaliyya (J): What made you write this book? Kamran Matin (KM): My main motivation in writing this book came from my dissatisfaction with existing accounts of the Iranian Revolution. Previous accounts imputed an "exceptional" character to the revolution on the grounds of its religious form. The argument that the revolution was "exceptional" neutralized the contradiction between the revolution’s religious form and the secular eschatology of ...

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Turkey Media Roundup (February 18)

[This is a roundup of news articles and other materials circulating on Turkey and reflects a wide variety of opinions. It does not reflect the views of the Turkey Page Editors or of Jadaliyya. You may send your own recommendations for inclusion in each week's roundup to turkey@jadaliyya.com by Sunday night of every week.] English Graft Crisis Academics and Jurists Warn the Government Many academics and jurists signed a statement saying that the "rule of law is suspended" in Turkey. Enlightenment Doğu Ergil suggests that “we should not be satisfied by those who are only content ...

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The Present Flies, the Past Remains

Le passé [The Past], directed by Asghar Farhadi. France/Italy, 2013. In an interview given last year, Asghar Farhadi, the Iranian filmmaker best known for his Oscar-winning film, A Separation (2011), discussed the influence of theater on his work: “What I tried to take from theater to cinema is that every viewer sees his own movie, and that nothing is imposed to him or her. This means that we cannot see the world with a precise angle. There should always be different angles,” like in theater where everyone sees a different play by virtue of sitting in a different seat. Le passé [The Past], ...

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New Texts Out Now: VJ Um Amel, A Digital Humanities Approach: Text, the Internet, and the Egyptian Uprising

Laila Shereen Sakr (VJ Um Amel), “A Digital Humanities Approach: Text, the Internet, and the Egyptian Uprising,” Middle East Critique Volume 22, Issue 3 (2013). Jadaliyya: What made you write this article? Laila Shereen Sakr/VJ Um Amel (LSS/VJUA): The idea for the article came from a discussion I had over a year ago with Middle East Critique Guest Editor Mark LeVine about why some scholars are averse to study text that is accessed through a database. I explained to him why I believe it is critical to have people trained in humanistic and social research looking at what is posted on the ...

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Turkey Media Roundup (February 11)

[This is a roundup of news articles and other materials circulating on Turkey and reflects a wide variety of opinions. It does not reflect the views of the Turkey Page Editors or of Jadaliyya. You may send your own recommendations for inclusion in each week's roundup to turkey@jadaliyya.com by Sunday night of every week.] English Graft Crisis Kurdish and German Angles of Erdoğan-Gülen Rift Murat Yetkin analyzes Turkey’s international relations, peace negotiations, and upcoming local elections in light of the graft crisis. Two Centuries of Conspiracy Nuray Mert suggests that conspiracy ...

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New JADMAG: Gaza Revisited

Gaza Revisited Edited by Noura Erakat Electronic copy: $5.49  Paperback: $7.99  Combination package: $9.99   In November 2012, Israel began an aerial bombing campaign against the Gaza Strip that lasted eight gruesome days. Even in its first hours, and before its full magnitude was known, the military campaign sparked urgency amongst observers because of the memory it evoked. In winter 2008/09, Israel conducted a twenty-two day military offensive against the besieged territory. The offensive, infamously known as Operation Cast Lead, killed some 1,300 Palestinians ...

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New Texts Out Now: Kurdish Studies

Kurdish Studies Volume 1, Issue 1 (October 2013). J: What made you start the journal Kurdish Studies, and who are the scholars involved in its editorial work? Kurdish Studies (KS): The scholarly field of Kurdish studies has developed significantly over the last few decades, and has become an important field of study. This development expresses itself in the number of active researchers as well as articles and books published in the field of Kurdish Studies, but also in the various disciplines they cover: migration and diaspora studies, history, social sciences, political sciences, cultural ...

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The Ottoman Scramble for Africa

During the nineteenth century, the place of the Ottoman Empire in the European state system became the subject of continual debate among the major players on the world political stage. Ottoman statesmen were acutely aware of the empire’s relatively weak position vis-à-vis its neighbors and sought to manage this situation while simultaneously expanding the role of state institutions in the provinces. We often see the Ottomans forced to accept unfavorable economic and political arrangements while playing other empires off each other in order to maintain autonomy. From this perspective, the ...

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Turkey Media Roundup (February 4)

[This is a roundup of news articles and other materials circulating on Turkey and reflects a wide variety of opinions. It does not reflect the views of the Turkey Page Editors or of Jadaliyya. You may send your own recommendations for inclusion in each week's roundup to turkey@jadaliyya.com by Sunday night of every week.] Graft Crisis Corruption, the Government, the Cemaat: A Survey Ahmet Hakan draws attention to a survey conducted by the MetroPOLL Strategic and Social Research Center on the graft crisis. Turkish Public Mark Rising Gloom and Mistrust Yavuz Baydar comments on “Turkey’s ...

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Women/Pioneers: Challenging the Myth of Zionist Egalitarianism

Women/Pioneers, directed by Michal Aviad. Israel, 2013. “When we got here, we met the women who preceded us. When we saw their suntanned faces, we each asked ourselves: Will you give your face, your body, to this desolate land?” A hundred years ago, women emigrated from Europe to Palestine to establish the kibbutz of Ein Harod. Their diaries and letters are filled with questions, concerns, and a dream to create a new, independent woman. One writer laments that her hands are too small to carry bushels of hay. Another woman is struck with terror at the prospect of crossing paths with an Arab. ...

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New Texts Out Now: Lisa Wedeen, Ideology and Humor in Dark Times: Notes from Syria

Lisa Wedeen, “Ideology and Humor in Dark Times: Notes from Syria.” Critical Inquiry 39.4 (2013). Jadaliyya (J): What made you write this article? Lisa Wedeen (LW): This article is part of a book project on what I call “neoliberal autocracy” and its unmaking. The book was initially envisioned as an account of aging authoritarianism and generational change. Then the uprisings happened and my orientation, although still centered on issues animating that project, had to evolve in response to new circumstances--conditions that have produced moments of joyous camaraderie, as well as ongoing ...

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Turkey Media Roundup (January 28)

[This is a roundup of news articles and other materials circulating on Turkey and reflects a wide variety of opinions. It does not reflect the views of the Turkey Page Editors or of Jadaliyya. You may send your own recommendations for inclusion in each week's roundup to turkey@jadaliyya.com by Sunday night of every week.] English Graft Crisis Turkey's Test of Wills Abukar Arman argues that it is naive to look at the Erdoğan/Gülen conflict as if it were merely a domestic power play. Gülen Accused Of Attempting "Coup" Against Turkish Prime Minister Erdogan Jacob Resneck asks ...

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Matter Matters

Ralf Brand and Sara Fregonese, The Radicals' City: Urban Environment, Polarization, Cohesion. Surrey: Ashgate, 2013. The Radicals’ City is a rich and illuminating book on the intricate relations between the urban environment as a material setting and socio-spatial conflict-related phenomena, such as radicalization, polarization, and social cohesion. Brand and Fregonese’s message is simple but raises at the same time profound philosophical and existential questions regarding the human and built environment relations; it invites us to take objects seriously. For Brand and Fregonese, the urban ...

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New Texts Out Now: Jacobin Magazine, Special Section on the Gulf Cooperation Council

Special Section on the Gulf Cooperation Council (edited by Max Ajl), Jacobin 13 (January 2014). Jadaliyya (J): What made you put together this special section on the Gulf Cooperation Council (GCC)? Jacobin (JAC): Over the past several years, it has become impossible to ignore the role of the Gulf Cooperation Council in the Middle East and North Africa (MENA) region. References to petrodollars, petro-power, and Gulf-peddled sectarianism are constant, yet somehow simultaneously elusive. It is increasingly common knowledge that the GCC and the United States work in lockstep, but the mechanisms ...

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New Texts Out Now: Claire Beaugrand, Amélie Le Renard, Roman Stadnicki, Villes et dynamiques urbaines en péninsule Arabique / Cities and Urban Dynamics in the Arabian Peninsula

Claire Beaugrand, Amélie Le Renard, and Roman Stadnicki (eds.), "Villes et dynamiques urbaines en péninsule Arabique / Cities and Urban Dynamics in the Arabian Peninsula." Special issue of Arabian Humanities 2 (2013). Jadaliyya (J): Can you first tell us about Arabian Humanities, and why you chose to publish this collection of essays in this particular journal? Claire Beaugrand, Amélie Le Renard, and Roman Stadnicki (CB, ALR, and RS): Arabian Humanities is a newly launched, peer-reviewed online journal covering academic research on the Gulf and the Arabian Peninsula, in all ...

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Understanding Gender Politics in Modern Iran

By Alex Shams The 1979 Iranian Revolution dramatically changed how Iranians thought about their lives and country in every single way. Never before in modern history had a popular revolution led to the establishment of an Islamic Republic, and for the most part neither Iranians nor foreigners had any idea what to expect as the self-proclaimed Islamic order came to power. Nowhere were the dramatic transformations brought by the revolution more pronounced than in the realm of gender relations. The secular Pahlavi regime had represented itself as the harbinger of Western modernity in Iran, ...

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Turkey Media Roundup (January 21)

[This is a roundup of news articles and other materials circulating on Turkey and reflects a wide variety of opinions. It does not reflect the views of the Turkey Page Editors or of Jadaliyya. You may send your own recommendations for inclusion in each week's roundup to turkey@jadaliyya.com by Sunday night of every week.] English Graft Crisis Erdoğan Backtracks on Failed Policies (1)-(2) Cengiz Çandar criticizes Erdoğan, calling him “a shining example of metamorphosis—from an asset to a liability for Turkey." Will Corruption Scandal Lead to Return of Military to Politics? (1)-(2)-(3) ...

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A Bomb, With Ribbon Around It

South Asian Women’s Creative Collective, A Bomb, With Ribbon Around It. Queens Museum, Queens, New York, 14 December 2013 – 18 January 2014. A Bomb, With a Ribbon Around It, at the Queens Museum through 18 January 2014, is an eclectic collection of contemporary works from the South Asian Women’s Creative Collective, more commonly known as SAWCC. The show is part of SAWCC’s ongoing work—since its inception sixteen years ago as a grassroots, feminist arts collective in New York—to magnify the voices of emerging and established women artists in the South Asian community. To this end SAWCC, ...

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New Texts Out Now: Rebecca Joubin, The Politics of Love: Sexuality, Gender, and Marriage in Syrian Television Drama

Rebecca Joubin, The Politics of Love: Sexuality, Gender, and Marriage in Syrian Television Drama. Lanham, MD: Lexington Books, 2013. Jadaliyya (J): What made you write this book? Rebecca Joubin (RJ): Despite the mass media attention that the most prolonged crisis of the “Arab Spring turned Winter” has generated, Syria remains an enigma. In order to attain a small modicum of understanding, one must sift through biased information from all sides of the uprising. In The Politics of Love: Sexuality, Gender, and Marriage in Syrian Television Drama, I contend that Syria’s television industry ...

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Turkey Media Roundup (January 14)

[This is a roundup of news articles and other materials circulating on Turkey and reflects a wide variety of opinions. It does not reflect the views of the Turkey Page Editors or of Jadaliyya. You may send your own recommendations for inclusion in each week's roundup to turkey@jadaliyya.com by Sunday night of every week.] English The Graft Crisis A State Crisis in Turkey? Selin Giritli offers a comprehensive summary of the “state crisis” that the graft probes triggered in Turkey. Q&A: Turkey's Power Struggle “Turkey’s Prime Minister is facing the biggest threat to his authority ...

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From Oriental Nightingales to Peace Pigeons

On a rainy winter night in Idil/Turkey, in 2011, the tribesmen whom I was interviewing asked their Dengbêj (Storyteller) to sing for them.[1] The Dengbêj said he could not sing anymore because he was ill. The tribesmen teased him, saying they knew he had stopped singing after they had been displaced from their land and resettled in a small town in southeastern Turkey in the early 1990s. That was not all, however: the Dengbêj also wanted to avoid appearing on Kurdish television—which had become a new forum for storytelling—for fear of potentially inviting the ire and violence of the Turkish ...

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Genealogies and Balance Sheets of the Arab Uprisings

Gilbert Achcar, The People Want: A Radical Exploration of the Arab Uprising. Translated by G. M. Goshgarian. Berkeley: University of California Press, 2013. In Alice in Wonderland, a flustered white rabbit asks the king: “Where shall I begin, your majesty?” The king answers gravely: “Begin at the beginning…and go on till you come to the end: then stop.” Telling a story—let alone one as complicated as that of the Arab uprisings and their historical lineage—from beginning to end is a task few can complete. And by “from beginning to end,” I don’t mean a linear, deterministic narrative ...

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Tadween Roundup: News and Analysis from the Publishing/Academic World

Tadween Publishing brings you the latest news and analysis from the publishing and academic worlds that relate to pedagogy and knowledge production.  Education  ‘We are Creating Walmarts of Higher Education’  By Timothy Pratt (The Atlantic)  The number of higher education institutions across the United States dropping courses and offering less credits is multiplying as universities try to grapple with budget cuts. With budget shortfalls leading to cuts in staff and courses, educators are beginning to wonder if universities are at risk of “dumbing” down the ...

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Statement of Support for the American Studies Association By Palestinian and other Arab-American Scholars and Writers

[The following statement of support was issued by the below signatories on 7 January 2014.] We, the undersigned Palestinian and other Arab-American scholars and writers as well as Arab scholars in the United States affirm our strong solidarity with the American Studies Association’s position in favor of the boycott of Israeli academic institutions.  We also condemn, in the strongest possible terms, the expressions of hate and intimidation to which ASA members are being subjected, tactics that are illegal or verge on illegality under U.S. law.  We express our heartfelt gratitude ...

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Turkey Media Roundup (January 7)

[This is a roundup of news articles and other materials circulating on Turkey and reflects a wide variety of opinions. It does not reflect the views of the Turkey Page Editors or of Jadaliyya. You may send your own recommendations for inclusion in each week's roundup to turkey@jadaliyya.com by Sunday night of every week.] English Graft Crisis 2014: Turkey’s Year of Destiny (1)-(2)-(3)-(4) Murat Yetkin points out that “Turkey is entering a new year with heavy problems inherited from 2013.” The Power of Satire Doğu Ergil writes that both the Gezi uprising and the recent graft crisis are ...

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Apples of the Golan: A Review

Apples of the Golan. Directed by Jill Beardsworth and Keith Walsh. Austria/Ireland/Syria, 2012. A man places four apples on the ground in a rectangle. He paces back and forth between them. “The cell was seventy centimeters by 1.8 meters. I was sleeping with no mattress…twenty-four hours in darkness. I was there for seventy-three days.” He describes his torture: he was placed, exposed, in a tire, and lashed with a cable. He was lifted by his arms and tied up with ropes, left to support his body weight on the tips of his toes for hours at a time. Other prisoners had their entire bodies ...

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The Not-So-Tangled Web of Tear Gas Manufacturers

As waves of popular uprising have spread across the globe, these disparate movements have all faced overwhelming repression from their own police or military forces. Beyond a general sense of popular power, what unites these popular revolts more than anything else is the tool used to quell mass protests: tear gas. But perhaps what is most striking is that the same handful of tear gas manufacturers ship their gas to repressive regimes around the world. Using data compiled from several sources, chief among them the Facing Tear Gas campaign, a project of the US-based War Resisters League, I ...

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Spotlight: Shamaa (Arab Educational Information Network)

Tadween Publishing puts the spotlight on Shamaa: Arab Educational Information Network, as part of Tadween’s campaign to highlight individuals, groups, and organizations who play a role in the open access movement and knowledge production and preservation. Tadween (T): Could you explain the concept behind Shamaa and how it began? Shamaa (S): A group of educational professors dreamt of an education database in the Arab world similar to ERIC, and then this dream came to life. In 2007, the concept of Shamaa started as a pilot project. Some organizations like Ford ...

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NEWTON 2013 Year in Review

As the editors of the New Texts Out Now (NEWTON) Page, we have been honored to have the opportunity to feature an astonishing range of books, articles, and films for Jadaliyya readers in 2013. With authors generously agreeing to discuss their new works, offer background information on their research, and allow us to post excerpts from their books and articles, we have been able to offer first looks at some of the most important new work in the field, from established names and rising stars alike. With 2014 now underway, and a new crop of work on the horizon, this is an opportune moment ...

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Turkey Media Roundup (December 31)

[This is a roundup of news articles and other materials circulating on Turkey and reflects a wide variety of opinions. It does not reflect the views of the Turkey Page Editors or of Jadaliyya. You may send your own recommendations for inclusion in each week's roundup to turkey@jadaliyya.com by Sunday night of every week.] English Graft Crisis Turkey’s Political Weather Forecast (1)-(2)-(3)-(4) Murat Yetkin criticizes Prime Minister Erdoğan’s use of international conspiracy theories to explain the graft investigations. Tweeting in English Proves International Conspiracy!  “A ...

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Proverbs, Politics, and Paris: An Interview with Nancy Kricorian

Nancy Kricorian loves proverbs, especially Armenian ones. She has been collecting them for years, finding them in various books and corners of the internet and then saving them in her ever growing collection, which she shares through social media. Her current favorite—“Law is written for the rich, punishment for the poor”—is more than fitting for the novelist, poet, and activist, who strives to highlight those standing at the margins of society, whether through her novels or the various campaigns she has organized as a staff member of the grassroots social justice and anti-war movement, ...

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Toward a Political Economy of the Arab Uprisings (Part Two)

[Part One of this article can be found here.] The Evolution of the Authoritarian Coalition and the Role of the Middle Classes In the initial decades after independence, Arab governments—and especially the republics—introduced policies that led to significant social change. In particular, statist economic policies coupled with welfare programs and subsidies on basic food items and fuel facilitated the rise of proto-middle classes. Public-sector workers, benefiting from job security and social benefits, were the most important component of the new middle classes. Also emerging was a ...

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Toward a Political Economy of the Arab Uprisings (Part One)

A framework to explain the Arab uprisings should provide an account of the socioeconomic and political evolution of the Arab republics that would explain both the persistence of autocracy until 2011 and its eventual collapse and should do so in a way that is empirically verifiable. Different analysts would approach such an ambitious question in distinct ways. Some would stress contingency and agency, and undeniably, there were such elements in the particular timing of the uprisings in Tunisia and Egypt. But we contend here that there must also have been structural factors that opened up a ...

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New Texts Out Now: Samia Errazzouki, Working-Class Women Revolt: Gendered Political Economy in Morocco

Samia Errazzouki, “Working-Class Women Revolt: Gendered Political Economy in Morocco.” The Journal of North African Studies Volume 19, Issue 2 [Special Issue on Women, Gender, and the Arab Spring, edited by Andrea Khalil], March 2014. Jadaliyya (J): What made you write this article? Samia Errazzouki (SE): I was in Morocco when Mohammed Bouazizi set himself on fire and many in Morocco, at the time, were anticipating what would follow suit. Not too long after Bouazizi’s self-immolation, on 21 February 2011, Fadoua Laroui, a single mother whose application for public housing was ...

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Turkey Media Roundup (December 24)

[This is a roundup of news articles and other materials circulating on Turkey and reflects a wide variety of opinions. It does not reflect the views of the Turkey Page Editors or of Jadaliyya. You may send your own recommendations for inclusion in each week's roundup to turkey@jadaliyya.com by Sunday night of every week.] English Graft Probe Corruption Probe Might Grow to Rock Turkish Gov’t (1)-(2)-(3) Murat Yetkin comments on the three incidents that occurred on 16 and 17 December. The Iran-Gold-Halkbank Triangle Uğur Gürses discusses the Iran-Gold-Halkbank triangle. Iranian Gold Stars ...

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Lubunca and the History of Istanbul Slang

How did past people speak in their daily lives? Because historical documentation of spoken language is often thin, this question has fascinated and frustrated generations of linguists. Nowhere could this be truer than in Turkey, where radical sociolinguistic transformations since the end of the Ottoman period have largely erased the traces of what was a highly oral and multilingual Ottoman culture. In Ottoman History Podcast Episode #135, Nicholas Kontovas takes us inside the social world that created one Turkish slang variety known as Lubunca. This jargon is mainly used among Turkey’s LGBTQ ...

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New Texts Out Now: Sunaina Maira, Jil Oslo: Palestinian Hip Hop, Youth Culture, and the Youth Movement

Sunaina Maira, Jil Oslo: Palestinian Hip Hop, Youth Culture, and the Youth Movement. Washington, DC: Tadween Publishing, 2013. Jadaliyya (J): What made you write this book? Sunaina Maira (SM): I wrote this book because I was deeply moved, in the first instance, by the hip hop coming out of Palestine and by the searing critique of settler colonial dispossession and racial violence in the songs of rappers such as DAM. Listening to the music coming out of Lid, Acca, and, increasingly, Ramallah, Dheisheh camp, and other places across Palestine underscored for me the ways in which young ...

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Brushing History against the Grain

Abdel Razzaq Takriti, Monsoon Revolution: Republicans, Sultans, and Empires in Oman, 1965-1976. New York and Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2013. We are left alone with our day, and the time is short, and
 History to the defeated
 May say Alas but cannot help nor pardon. - W.H. Auden, “Spain” It is now trite to say that as long as colonialism has existed, so has resistance to it. Yet the history of colonialism and resistance is still incomplete. This is because—traditionally—historical accounts were written from primarily two points of view: that of the colonizer, and that of ...

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ASA Members Vote To Endorse Academic Boycott of Israel

 [The following announcement was released by the American Studies Association on 16 December 2013.] The members of the American Studies Association have endorsed the Association’s participation in a boycott of Israeli academic institutions. In an election that attracted 1252 voters, the largest number of participants in the organization’s history, 66.05% of voters endorsed the resolution, while 30.5% of voters voted no and 3.43% abstained. The election was a response to the ASA National Council’s announcement on December 4 that it supported the academic boycott and, in an unprecedented ...

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Turkey Media Roundup (December 17)

English AKP-Gülen Community War Two Axes Clash in Turkish Politics Murat Yetkin comments on the jeopardization of the peace process after the killing of two civilians in Yüksekova, and the escalating tension between the AKP and the Gülen movement. The Need for a Truly Secular State Mustafa Akyol writes about Sibel Eraslan, an Islamic intellectual, who declares that “the Community-AKP conflict invites us to think more seriously about ‘secularism.’” Erdoğan Getting Hit in AKP-"Cemaat" War Kadri Gürsel comments on the publication of a 2004 National Security Council resolution ...

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Deadline for Applications: M.A. in Middle East and Islamic Studies at George Mason University

The Middle East Studies Program and the Ali Vural Ak Center for Global Islamic Studies at George Mason University announce the deadline for applications for the Fall/Spring 2014-2015 academic year: 15 February 2014. Click HERE for more information Click HERE to apply The aim of this degree program is to reposition the study of the Middle East and Islam within a global context to help students better analyze particular issues in light of current events and shifting historical paradigms. The program’s core classes provide a solid background in both fields of study, however students can ...

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Where the Tigris Flows: Water Security in Post-War Iraq and Turkey

Media coverage of Iraq in recent years has been dominated by the horrifying images of the American occupation, its impacts, and its aftermath. Sometimes lost among the political turmoil are the stories of how daily life continues and persists and how it is affected by the issues of the day. What will be the legacy of the past decade in the eyes of the future? One issue that has gained attention from scholars of the Middle East in recent years is ecology. Historians have come to view the relationship between human society and the environment as a critical one for understandings of the past ...

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Tadween Roundup: News and Analysis from the Publishing/Academic World

Tadween Publishing brings you the latest news and analysis from the publishing and academic worlds that relate to pedagogy and knowledge production.  Education  How Academia Resembles a Drug Gang  By Alexandre Afonso  In a slightly nuanced view on how new PhD students seek entry into academia, blogger Alexandre Afonso compares the struggle to make it in academia to a drug gang.  The Great Stratification  By Jeffery J. Williams (Chronicle of Higher Education)  As professorial jobs dwindle, will the idea of the professor be for the history books ...

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New Texts Out Now: Abdel Razzaq Takriti, Monsoon Revolution: Republicans, Sultans, and Empires in Oman, 1965-1976

Abdel Razzaq Takriti, Monsoon Revolution: Republicans, Sultans, and Empires in Oman, 1965-1976. Oxford and New York: Oxford University Press, 2013. Jadaliyya (J): What made you write this book? Abdel Razzaq Takriti (ART): I first encountered the Dhufar revolution in a seminar on social movements in the Middle East convened by Amir Hassanpour. This was the longest running major armed struggle in the history of the Arabian Peninsula, Britain's last classic colonial war in the region, and one of the highlights of the Cold War in the Middle East. It took place in a corner of the Arab world ...

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Jil Oslo: Palestinian Hip Hop, Youth Culture, and the Youth Movement

Jil Oslo: Palestinian Hip Hop, Youth Culture, and the Youth Movement  By Sunaina Maira Paperback: $16.00 E-book: $12.00 Based on ethnographic research in Palestine, primarily during the Arab uprisings, Jil Oslo: Palestinian Hip Hop, Youth Culture, and the Youth Movementexplores the intersections between new youth cultures and protest politics among Palestinian youth in the West Bank and Israel. It focuses on Palestinian hip hop and the youth movement that emerged in 2011 as overlapping sites where new cultural and political imaginaries are being produced in the Oslo ...

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Turkey Media Roundup (December 10)

[This is a roundup of news articles and other materials circulating on Turkey and reflects a wide variety of opinions. It does not reflect the views of the Turkey Page Editors or of Jadaliyya. You may send your own recommendations for inclusion in each week's roundup to turkey@jadaliyya.com by Sunday night of every week.] English Power Struggle Over Prep Schools Community-Government: Clues of the Tension In the story titled, “The plan to finish Gülen,” Oral Çalışlar writes that “we see that the tension is deepening, not moving toward reconciliation.” Leak Deepens AKP-Gülen rift Tülin ...

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New Texts Out Now: Ralf Brand and Sara Fregonese, The Radicals’ City: Urban Environment, Polarization, Cohesion

Ralf Brand and Sara Fregonese, The Radicals’ City: Urban Environment, Polarization, Cohesion. Farnham, UK: Ashgate, 2013. Jadaliyya (J): What made you write this book? Sara Fregonese (SF): The book is based on the research project “The Built Environment: Mirror and Mediator of Radicalization?” which ran from 2008 to 2010 at the University of Manchester, UK. It builds strongly on the significant amount of primary research data that the project produced. Our aim was to tell about radicalization and everyday urban conflicts in a way that isn’t limited to local politics, but instead integrates ...

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Turkey Media Roundup (December 3)

[This is a roundup of news articles and other materials circulating on Turkey and reflects a wide variety of opinions. It does not reflect the views of the Turkey Page Editors or of Jadaliyya. You may send your own recommendations for inclusion in each week's roundup to turkey@jadaliyya.com by Sunday night of every week.] English Power Struggle over Prep Schools Erdoğan Now at Odds With Once-Closest Ally “The Gülen sympathizers who helped Erdoğan get rid of soldiers from politics are now disappointed to see that Erdoğan does not want any shareholders of power alongside himself,” says Murat ...

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Implications of Morocco's Bifurcated Educational System

In Morocco, policymakers have recently implemented several groundbreaking initiatives aiming to create educational programs to empower rural women. Despite progress in this realm, there are still ongoing tensions within the Moroccan educational system. As a Moroccan who was educated in a multi-lingual system, I have experienced its flaws firsthand and recognize the need for its analysis. This study, therefore, assesses the quality of the Moroccan educational sector and the implications of a bifurcated educational system. The educational system is conducted in Fusha Arabic in public schools ...

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Tadween Roundup: News and Analysis in Publishing and Academia from the Arab World

[The following article was originally published on Tadween Publishing's blog. For more information on the publishing world as it relates to pedagogy and knowledge production, follow Tadween Publishing on Facebook and Twitter.] News and stories with a focus on the publishing industry, education, and technology from across the Arab world. MOOCs Coming to the Arab World  (Tadween Publishing)  A joint agreement between the online education website edX and the Queen Rania Foundation will create a new portal for Arabic-language ...

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Arab Studies Journal Spotlight: Visual Arts and Art Practices in the Middle East (Spring 2010)

Arab Studies Journal : Visual Arts and Art Practices in the Middle East (Spring 2010) This themed issue of the Arab Studies Journal was developed in response to the remarkable changes that have occurred over the last decade within the world of Middle Eastern art –  from the mushrooming of “independent” art spaces, events, and festivals regionally, to the burgeoning of a Gulf-based art market supported by an immense infrastructure of commercial galleries and world-class museums. This special issue of the Arab Studies Journal presents original scholarship, conversations, and reviews that ...

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Tornistan (Gezi Park Animated Film)

Tornistan. Written and directed by Ayçe Kartal. Turkey, 2013. Ayçe Kartal’s animated short film Tornistan has been gaining critical acclaim since its release this fall, thanks to its unique aesthetic interpretation of the Turkish media’s coverage of the Gezi Park protests of June 2013. The film, whose name translates as “Return” or “Backwards Run,” was drawn entirely by hand by Kartal, who has dedicated Tornistan to “those who were subjected to disproportionate force, those who were injured, and those who lost their lives in the Gezi Park events.” In an introduction to the film, Kartal ...

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Turkey: A Bird and a Country

Why does a familiar bird and typical Thanksgiving Day meal have the same name as the country of Turkey? What is the name for the turkey in other languages? Is there any link between the spread of turkeys into the Anglophone world and the Ottoman Empire? In this episode, we answer these questions and discuss more broadly the historical context within which the turkey and other foods such as potatoes and corn became part of global diets. Contributor Bios Chris Gratien is the editor and co-host of Ottoman History Podcast and a doctoral candidate in the Department of History at Georgetown ...

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NEWTONs You May Have Missed

With the fall semester coming to an end, we wanted to take an opportunity to remind you of some of the amazing NEWTON posts that you might have missed the first time around—especially those of you starting to think about your spring syllabi. If you wish to recommend a book or peer-reviewed article for a feature in NEWTON, please email us at reviews@jadaliyya.com. To stay up to date with ongoing discussions by scholars and instructors in the field, sign up for Jadaliyya’s Pedagogy Section.

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Teaching Thanksgiving

On Thursday millions of families and friends and colleagues will gather together to celebrate Thanksgiving in the United States. Universities will be closed, and classes will be cancelled. Every year, this holiday weekend poses challenges to professors and students who are critical, and critically aware, of the fact that Thanksgiving is, foundationally speaking, a celebration of the ongoing genocide against native peoples and cultures in the United States. As a newly-minted professor who mainly teaches on questions of law, religion, secularism, power and gender in anthropology courses ...

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Turkey Media Roundup (November 26)

[This is a roundup of news articles and other materials circulating on Turkey and reflects a wide variety of opinions. It does not reflect the views of the Turkey Page Editors or of Jadaliyya. You may send your own recommendations for inclusion in each week's roundup to turkey@jadaliyya.com by Sunday night of every week.] English Diyarbakır Meeting Erdoğan Should Not Forget This Semih İdiz writes that “history will tell if the ‘historic day,’ as it is being called, in Diyarbakır this weekend was indeed a historic one.” The Erdoğan-Barzani Alliance: A Turkish Policy Classic Nuray Mert ...

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Q&A: edX President Anant Agarwal on MOOCs in the Arab World

[The following article was originally published on Tadween Publishing's blog. For more information on the publishing world as it relates to pedagogy and knowledge production, follow Tadween Publishing on Facebook and Twitter.] EdX and the Queen Rania Foundation for Education and Development recently announced the creation of the Arabic-language online education portal Edraak. Anant Agarwal, edX’s president, answers a few of Tadween’s questions about the collaboration that will bring MOOCs (massive open online courses) to the Arab ...

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Protectors of the 'Failed State': 'Captain Phillips' and the Intrigue of Somali Pirates

Captain Phillips. Directed by Paul Greenglass. USA, 2013. Appearing in US theaters in mid-October, Captain Phillips, starring Tom Hanks and directed by Paul Greenglass, has been a smash at box offices, grossing nearly one hundred million dollars in its first several weeks. Greengrass’ cinematic style is perhaps best known from his direction of The Bourne Trilogy, as well as United 93, a film depicting the airline that crashed in Stoneycreek Township, Pennsylvania on 9/11. Tackling the subject of Somali pirates, Captain Phillips is supremely ambitious in treading into the murky depths of the ...

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New Texts Out Now: Farha Ghannam, Live and Die Like a Man: Gender Dynamics in Urban Egypt

Farha Ghannam, Live and Die Like a Man: Gender Dynamics in Urban Egypt. Palo Alto: Stanford University Press, 2013. Jadaliyya (J): What made you write this book? Farha Ghannam (FG): The study of gender in the Middle East has been largely approached through the question of women. While this focus has been very productive in that it generated a rich body of literature that countered many simplistic assumptions about women as passive and powerless, little attention has been paid to men as gendered subjects. Masculinity was often left assumed and invisible rather than problematized and ...

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MOOCs Coming to the Arab World

[The following article was originally published on Tadween Publishing's blog. For more information on the publishing world as it relates to pedagogy and knowledge production, follow Tadween Publishing on Facebook and Twitter.] The growing phenomenon of MOOCs (massive open online courses) is no longer contained to the English language. After announcing partnerships that will create MOOCs in Chinese and in French, EdX recently announced that it will be partnering with the Queen Rania Foundation for Education and Development to ...

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Turkey Media Roundup (November 19)

[This is a roundup of news articles and other materials circulating on Turkey and reflects a wide variety of opinions. It does not reflect the views of the Turkey Page Editors or of Jadaliyya. You may send your own recommendations for inclusion in each week's roundup to turkey@jadaliyya.com by Sunday night of every week.] English Diyarbakır Meeting Erdoğan Seeks Barzani Help in Kurdish Bid and Elections Murat Yetkin comments on the Diyarbakır meeting between Prime Minister Erdoğan and Iraqi Kurdish leader Massoud Barzani. The Diyarbakır Moment—A Harbinger of a Kurdish Spring? Yavuz ...

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New Texts Out Now: Asef Bayat, Post-Islamism: The Changing Faces of Political Islam

Asef Bayat, editor, Post-Islamism: The Changing Faces of Political Islam. New York and Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2013. Jadaliyya (J): What made you put together this book? Asef Bayat (AB): Well, for me the primary reason for producing this book was a realization that there was a major gap in the scholarship on Islamism. While so much has been written on political Islam—some of which remains solid scholarship—the mainstream perspectives tend to treat political Islam as if it were a static movement with little scope for change. Even those who did detect degrees of change in ...

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New Texts Out Now: Wael Hallaq, The Impossible State: Islam, Politics, and Modernity’s Moral Predicament

Wael Hallaq, The Impossible State: Islam, Politics, and Modernity’s Moral Predicament. New York: Columbia University Press, 2013. [This is a special edition of NEWTON that coincides with the upcoming launch of Jadaliyya's Critical Currents of Islam page. CCI aims to engage with a range of topics related to Islam as it is interpreted, practiced, and contested in political, cultural, and economic arenas throughout the world. The page is a place for fresh and critical perspectives on many of the issues that have defined internal discussions within Muslim societies and a space for highlighting ...

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New JADMAG: Beyond Dominant Narratives on the Western Sahara

Beyond Dominant Narratives on the Western Sahara Edited by Samia Errazzouki and Allison L. McManus  Electronic copy: $3.99  Paperback: $6.99  In the past few decades, both media and academic scholarship have marginalized the Western Saharan conflict, rendering it largely insignificant within regional and global political imaginations. Beginning as a post-colonial dispute between regional powers in the 1970s, the conflict developed and was exacerbated as North Africa became an entangled site of Cold War rivalries. Following the 1975 Madrid Accords, in which Spain ...

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Turkey Media Roundup (November 12)

[This is a roundup of news articles and other materials circulating on Turkey and reflects a wide variety of opinions. It does not reflect the views of the Turkey Page Editors or of Jadaliyya. You may send your own recommendations for inclusion in each week's roundup to turkey@jadaliyya.com by Sunday night of every week.] English Controlling Student Houses Erdogan Stirs Controversy on Women in University Housing Yavuz Baydar summarizes the public debate over Erdogan’s statements in regard to mixed-gender student houses. Erdogan's "Morality Police" Assume Duty Orhan Kemal Cengiz ...

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Tadween Roundup: News and Analysis in Publishing and Academia from the Arab World

[The following article was originally published on Tadween Publishing's blog. For more information on the publishing world as it relates to pedagogy and knowledge production, follow Tadween Publishing on Facebook and Twitter.] News and stories with a focus on the publishing industry, education, and technology from across the Arab world. Spotlight on Arab Publishing 2013  (Publishers Weekly)  In honor of the Sharjah International Book Fair (6-16 November), Publishers Weekly and Book ...

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Spotlight: Access to Mideast and Islamic Resources (AMIR)

Tadween Publishing interviewed Peter Magierski and Chuck Jones, founders of the blog Access to Mideast and Islamic Resources (AMIR), as part of Tadween’s campaign to highlight individuals, groups, and organizations who play a role in the open access movement and knowledge production and preservation.  Tadween (T): How did the concept for AMIR originate and what is its goal? Access to Mideast and Islamic Resources (AMIR): AMIR began as a collaboration between Peter Magierski and Charles Jones when they were both working at NYU Libraries. Jones had ...

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New Texts Out Now: Eliane Raheb, Sleepless Nights

Eliane Raheb, director. Sleepless Nights [Layali Bala Noom]. Itar Productions, 2012. Jadaliyya (J): What made you create this film? Eliane Raheb (ER): The idea of executing the Sleepless Nights documentary came gradually. I first read the apology and the confessions of Assaad Shaftari back in 2002, when a local newspaper published them in a three-part series. He answered several questions I had after the end of the civil war. I read his testimony, but I wanted to know more about him and his experience through the Lebanese civil war, how a normal human being turns to a fighter, a ...

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Education in the Arab World

[The following article was originally published on Tadween Publishing's blog. For more information on the publishing world as it relates to pedagogy and knowledge production, follow Tadween Publishing on Facebook and Twitter.] With a series of articles that range in focus from universities in the Gulf to Hezbollah’s private schooling, the Financial Times released a special report on 20 October 2013 highlighting education in the Arab world. Unfortunately, the Financial Times is under a paywall, where users can only access ...

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Turkey Media Roundup (November 5)

[This is a roundup of news articles and other materials circulating on Turkey and reflects a wide variety of opinions. It does not reflect the views of the Turkey Page Editors or of Jadaliyya. You may send your own recommendations for inclusion in each week's roundup to turkey@jadaliyya.com by Sunday night of every week.] English Breaking Taboos in the Turkish Parliament Murat Yetkin emphasizes that the Turkish Parliament broke one of its biggest taboos on 31 October, by welcoming four women wearing headscarves. Women and Democracy in Turkey Lale Kemal traces the headscarf taboo back to ...

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The Square: So Close Yet So Far

The Square. Directed by Jehane Noujaim. Egypt/USA, 2013. The Egyptian revolution has been hiccupping from crackdown to revolt. Meanwhile, it has collapsed from a climate of feverish utopia into violent party altercations often waged according to foreign interests. In a new documentary, The Square, Egyptian-American director Jehane Noujaim films the revolutionary struggle alongside her friends, representing it through the prism of Tahrir Square. The film starts with the beginning of the revolution in January 2011 and ends a few months before the present, days after Morsi's toppling. It shows ...

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Tadween Roundup: News and Analysis in Publishing and Academia from the Arab World

 [The following article was originally published on Tadween Publishing's blog. For more information on the publishing world as it relates to pedagogy and knowledge production, follow Tadween Publishing on Facebook and Twitter.] News and stories with a focus on the publishing industry, education, and technology from across the Arab world. Publishing is Another Victim of Syria’s Civil War  By M. Lynx Qualey (Publishing Perspectives)  Syria’s protracted civil conflict is tearing apart the country’s publishing industry. ...

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NEWTON in Focus: Palestine-Israel

This week we highlight various NEWTON texts relevant to the study of Palestine-Israel. The authors of these texts write from a wide range of perspectives, disciplinary approaches, and political frameworks. We encourage you to integrate these texts into your curricula in the coming semesters. If you wish to recommend a book or peer-reviewed article for a feature in NEWTON—whether on Palestine-Israel or on any other topics relevant to the region—please email us at reviews@jadaliyya.com. To stay up to date with ongoing discussions by scholars and instructors in the field, sign up for ...

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We Are All Complicit

An Enemy Of The People, written by Henrik Ibsen, dramaturgy/scenography and directed by Nora Amin. Lamusica Independent Theatre Group, Egypt, 2013. I don’t move my chair while watching a play. I don’t tend to wrestle with feelings of guilt watching a performance unfold. But I did both while watching An Enemy of the People at the American University in Cairo’s Oriental Hall on 12 October. Henrik Ibsen's five-act play has been transformed by director Nora Amin and LaMusica Independent Theatre Group into a one-act musical drama with a live rock band. In the play, ...

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Interview: Sarah Kendzior on Open Access in Academia

[The following article was originally published on Tadween Publishing's blog. For more information on the publishing world as it relates to pedagogy and knowledge production, follow Tadween Publishing on Facebook and Twitter.] Tadween Publishing interviewed Sarah Kendzior, a researcher and op-ed columnist for Al Jazeera English, about the growth of the open access movement in academia and the rise of MOOCs (massive open online courses). You can follow her on Twitter at @sarahkendzior. Tadween (T) : You have written extensively on the ...

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New Texts Out Now: Noura Erakat and Mouin Rabbani, Aborted State? The UN Initiative and New Palestinian Junctures

Noura Erakat and Mouin Rabbani, editors, Aborted State? The UN Initiative and New Palestinian Junctures. Washington, DC: Tadween Publishing, 2013. Jadaliyya (J): What made you write this book? Noura Erakat and Mouin Rabbani (NE & MR): The book represents a compilation of articles and documents published by Jadaliyya during the Palestinian bid for statehood at the United Nations in 2011-2012. We felt this moment represents—for better or worse—a critical juncture in Palestinian history and the Palestinian struggle for self-determination, deserving of proper analysis and contextualization. ...

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New Texts Out Now: Nelida Fuccaro, Histories of Oil and Urban Modernity in the Middle East

Nelida Fuccaro, editor, Histories of Oil and Urban Modernity in the Middle East. Special issue of Comparative Studies of South Asia, Africa, and the Middle East (April 2013). Jadaliyya (J): What made you put together this issue? Nelida Fuccaro (NF): It was my interest in the urban history of oil producing countries, combined with the availability of stimulating interdisciplinary research on oil cities, a topic that is relatively new to Middle Eastern studies. I find this research very appealing. First, it challenges standard portrayals of oil development throughout the region, a ...

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Tadween Roundup: News and Analysis from the Publishing/Academic World

[The following article was originally published on Tadween Publishing's blog. For more information on the publishing world as it relates to pedagogy and knowledge production, follow Tadween Publishing on Facebook and Twitter.] Tadween Publishing brings you the latest news and analysis from the publishing and academic worlds that relate to pedagogy and knowledge production.  Education  The Great Charter Tryout  (Newsweek)  Post-Katrina New Orleans saw a major revamp of its education system, based out of both ...

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Social Networking Provides a New Avenue for Open Access in Academia

[The following article was originally published on Tadween Publishing's blog. For more information on the publishing world as it relates to pedagogy and knowledge production, follow Tadween Publishing on Facebook and Twitter.] Social networking sites like Facebook and Twitter have played an instrumental role in transforming how educators and scholars connect with their audiences and their students. Websites like Academia.edu, a platform for sharing academic research that was launched in 2008, are attempting to push the public’s ...

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New Texts Out Now: H. Erdem Cipa and Emine Fetvaci, Writing History at the Ottoman Court

H. Erdem Çıpa and Emine Fetvacı, editors, Writing History at the Ottoman Court: Editing the Past, Fashioning the Future. Bloomington: Indiana University Press, 2013. Jadaliyya (J): What made you put together this collection? H. Erdem Çıpa and Emine Fetvacı (HEÇ & EF): The book grew out of a small symposium on Ottoman historiography that we organized in 2009 at Indiana University, Bloomington. The quality of the papers and the congeniality of the participants sparked such intense and fruitful conversations that we wanted to take the project further and publish a book containing expanded ...

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Turkey Media Roundup (October 1)

[This is a roundup of news articles and other materials circulating on Turkey and reflects a wide variety of opinions. It does not reflect the views of the Turkey Page Editors or of Jadaliyya. You may send your own recommendations for inclusion in each week's roundup to turkey@jadaliyya.com by Sunday night of every week.] English Democracy Package Examining previous democracy packages in Turkish history, Doğu Ergil points out the necessity of citizens' involvement in the process for a full-fledged democracy. Turkey Has Gone Through Significant Change “Despite its ups and downs, Turkey has ...

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New Texts Out Now: Lara Deeb and Mona Harb, Leisurely Islam: Negotiating Geography and Morality in Shi‘ite South Beirut

Lara Deeb and Mona Harb, Leisurely Islam: Negotiating Geography and Morality in Shi‘ite South Beirut. Princeton: Princeton University Press, 2013. Jadaliyya (J): What made you write this book? Lara Deeb (LD) and Mona Harb (MH): Leisurely Islam began as a series of conversations about how Dahiya—the area situated to the south of municipal Beirut, where we had each conducted our previous research—and the Shi‘i Islamic milieu centered there were changing in the early years of this century. We had both written a great deal about the political, institutional, urban, and religious ...

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New Texts Out Now: Sinan Antoon, The Corpse Washer

Sinan Antoon, The Corpse Washer. Translated from the Arabic by the author. London and New Haven: Yale University Press, 2013. Jadaliyya (J): What led you to write this novel? Sinan Antoon (SA): In March 2004, a year after the invasion and occupation of Iraq, I was reading the New York Times one morning and came across a story about men and women who made their living by washing the dead. Thanks to the military occupation and the violence it unleashed, corpses were piling up every day in record numbers. It was taking a heavy toll even on those already accustomed to confronting and dealing ...

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Hidden Histories at the French Archives

Conventional wisdom tells us that if we wish to understand the condition of the oppressed, it is best not to ask their oppressor, but historians of the Middle East have no such luxury. The archives of Western powers that once presided over colonial administrations in the region, and continue to exert their influence today, are a necessary evil for historians working on virtually any topic in Middle East history. However, the biases of these records and the governments that produced them do not entirely undermine their ability to highlight the voices of the region’s local communities. In fact, ...

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New Texts Out Now: Nathan Schneider, Thank You, Anarchy: Notes from the Occupy Apocalypse

Nathan Schneider, Thank You, Anarchy: Notes from the Occupy Apocalypse. Berkeley: University of California Press, 2013. Jadaliyya (J): What made you write this book? Nathan Schneider (NS): I couldn't not. I happened to be the first reporter allowed to cover the planning meetings that led to Occupy Wall Street, and when the movement became a tremendous media sensation in the fall of 2011, I felt an immense responsibility to communicate the wisdom and mayhem I witnessed up close to a world bombarded by misconceptions about this and other popular uprisings. Then, as Occupy's fifteen minutes of ...

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Analysis: Obama’s Promises for Education Reform

[The following article was originally published on Tadween Publishing's blog. For more information on the publishing world as it relates to pedagogy and knowledge production, follow Tadween Publishing on Facebook and Twitter.] “A higher education is the single best investment you can make in your future,” proclaimed US President Barack Obama on 22 August in Buffalo, NY. Standing on stage in front of hundreds of students at the State University of New York, Buffalo, Obama addressed the dire situation many prospective, current, and past ...

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New Texts Out Now: Ray Bush, Turmoil in North Africa

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Turkey Media Roundup (August 28)

[This is a roundup of news articles and other materials circulating on Turkey and reflects a wide variety of opinions. It does not reflect the views of the Turkey Page Editors or of Jadaliyya. You may send your own recommendations for inclusion in each week's roundup to turkey@jadaliyya.com by Sunday night of every week.] English Turkish Foreign Policy How Turkey Went From “Zero Problems” to Zero Friends Piotr Zalewski gives a recap of Turkey's post-Arab spring foreign policy: "Prime Minister Recep Tayyip Erdogan has now burned his bridges with the military regime in Egypt, squabbled ...

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New Texts Out Now: Christiane Gruber and Sune Haugbolle, Visual Culture in the Modern Middle East

Christiane Gruber and Sune Haugbolle, editors, Visual Culture in the Modern Middle East: Rhetoric of the Image. Bloomington: Indiana University Press, 2013. Jadaliyya (J): What made you put together this collection? Christiane Gruber and Sune Haugbolle (CG & SH): When we first met at a memory studies workshop in 2007, we talked about the need to bring visual culture as an emergent discipline into communication with media studies of the Middle East. In our discussions, we agreed that it would be fruitful to exchange ideas and materials in a workshop format, so we organized a conference ...

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Istanbul, Its People, and Their Limits

Ecumenapolis: City Without Limits. Directed by Imre Azem. Turkey and Germany, 2012. Almost exactly a year before the current protests in Turkey—commonly referred to as “Occupy Gezi,” after Gezi Park, located in the Taksim neighborhood of Istanbul—a film called Ecumenapolis: City Without Limits was screened in the very same park. The event was announced as a public premiere, and it was co-sponsored by two groups. The first was the Taksim Coalition, comprised of concerned city planners, architects, local business owners, and activists. The second was the Istanbul chapter of the Chambers Union ...

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Tadween Roundup: News and Analysis in Publishing and Academia from the Arab World

[The following is a roundup of the latest news and analysis from the publishing world that relates to pedagogy and knowledge production. It was originally published on Tadween Publishing's blog. For more updates, follow Tadween Publishing on Facebook and Twitter.] “Professor, You’re Dividing My Nation”: In Iraqi Kurdistan, Tongues are Tied by Politics By Sophie Hardach (Chronicle of Higher Education) In Iraqi Kurdistan, scholars are caught in a war of words over language. Critical Citizenship for Critical Times By Maha Bali (Al ...

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World War I and the Ottoman Home Front

The centennial of the First World War is fast approaching. In 2015, Turkey will commemorate the hundredth anniversary of the Gallipoli Campaign, both a major victory and collective trauma of the war, and Armenians will do the same in remembrance of the Armenian Genocide. With important and contentious issues of memory front and center in the public sphere, historical discussion of the World War I period will be as relevant as ever. This episode of Ottoman History Podcast, with Yiğit Akın, offers a new perspective on a well-studied conflict, employing the approaches of social history to shed ...

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New Texts Out Now: Adel Iskandar, Egypt in Flux: Essays on an Unfinished Revolution

Adel Iskandar, Egypt in Flux: Essays on an Unfinished Revolution. Cairo and New York: The American University in Cairo Press, 2013. Jadaliyya (J): What made you write this book? Adel Iskandar (AI): The book was not written with the intention of becoming a single contiguous narrative that coheres. In fact, it wasn’t even written to be a book. Instead, it was a collection of standalone articles composed at various junctures in the tumultuous life of revolutionary Egypt. As events unfolded, my modest musings served as a means of reflecting, at least for personal contemplation, about the ...

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The Whys and Hows of Staging a MESA Annual Meeting

The annual meetings of the Middle East Studies Association (MESA) are large. There are only a handful of hotels that have a sufficient number of sleeping rooms for attendees and adequate meeting space for panels. Normally, MESA does not use convention centers because they cost at a minimum sixty thousand dollars right off the top. In the few cases where we have used them (e.g., Anchorage and Montréal), those facilities were provided at no cost by the convention bureaus of the cities. MESA members prefer the warmer and cozier atmosphere of a single hotel to the cavernous meeting space at ...

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Shaking Up Expectations: The Boundless New Horizons of Iranian American Literature

Tremors: New Fiction by Iranian American Writers. Edited by Anita Amirrezvani and Persis Karim. Fayetteville: University of Arkansas Press, 2013. Iranian American literature has been caught in a representational bind, one that is overdetermined by the fraught relationship between Iran and the United States. Is it the writer’s job to challenge stereotypes about Iran and Iranians, to educate American readers about Iran as an act of literary diplomacy? Or are we to write unconstrained by the geopolitical context, making representational choices regardless of how they align with dominant ...

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As it Becomes a Standard, Criticism for Common Core Erupts

[The following article was originally published on Tadween Publishing's blog. For more information on the publishing world as it relates to pedagogy and knowledge production, follow Tadween Publishing on Facebook and Twitter.] The New York Times calls the adoption of the Common Core State Standards “the most far-reaching experiment in American educational history.” The initiative, which has been implemented in forty-five states, the District of Columbia, and four US territories, promises to be “the first step in providing our young people ...

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New Texts Out Now: Toby Matthiesen, Sectarian Gulf: Bahrain, Saudi Arabia, and the Arab Spring That Wasn't

Toby Matthiesen, Sectarian Gulf: Bahrain, Saudi Arabia, and the Arab Spring That Wasn't. Palo Alto: Stanford University Press, 2013. Jadaliyya (J): What made you write this book? Toby Matthiesen (TM): I wanted to show how the Arab Spring impacted the Gulf countries and how they tried to counter the challenges arising from the revolutions spreading across the region. I felt that this was a story that was generally under-reported and under-studied, and my book is a small attempt to try to change that. I probably would not have written this kind of book had I not experienced the ...

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The Tahrir Documents: Assembling the Egyptian Uprising

[The following article was originally published on Tadween Publishing's blog. For more information on the publishing world as it relates to pedagogy and knowledge production, follow Tadween Publishing on Facebook and Twitter.] Tadween recently interviewed David Hirsch, librarian for Middle Eastern Studies at the University of California, Los Angles, about the Tahrir Documents, a project which collected and translated material from the protests at Tahrir Square in Cairo. This interview is part of Tadween’s new campaign to highlight the role of ...

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New Texts Out Now: Derya Bayir, Minorities and Nationalism in Turkish Law

Derya Bayir, Minorities and Nationalism in Turkish Law. London: Ashgate, 2013. Jadaliyya (J): What made you write this book? Derya Bayir (DB): Turkey’s uneasy relation with its multi-ethnic and multi-religious diversity is well known. The resurgence of the Kurdish minority over the last three decades has sharpened this uneasy relation. When I began writing this book, the initial question was to locate Turkey’s position in light of developments and trends in international law regarding the protection of minorities. This initial question soon proved too immature, since it became ...

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Turkey Media Roundup (August 7)

[This is a roundup of news articles and other materials circulating on Turkey and reflects a wide variety of opinions. It does not reflect the views of the Turkey Page Editors or of Jadaliyya. You may send your own recommendations for inclusion in each week's roundup to turkey@jadaliyya.com by Sunday night of every week.] English Criminalizing the Opposition İhsan Dağ says that “the ruling party, like its Kemalist predecessors, views politics as a battlefield in which they must either eliminate their opponents or be eliminated.” Why is Erdoğan Polarizing Turkey? Şahin Alpay believes that ...

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Shaking the Silence

The river has two banks—A Palestinian-Jordanian Art Intervention The identities of Jordanians and Palestinians are intricately linked. Some liken the relationship to that of a majority towards a minority; others say it oscillates between oppression and companionship. Whatever the case, and despite the shared history, the lack of a deeper exchange between the two banks of the River Jordan continues. Under the title The river has two banks, three visual artists and curators from Palestine and Jordan—Shuruq Harb, Samah Hijawi, and Toleen Touq—have shaken up this self-imposed silence by creating ...

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The Kurdish Music Industry: History and Politics

Ottoman History Podcast Episode #116 features the research of Alev Kuruoğlu on the development of the Kurdish music industry in Turkey and abroad. The episode is a historiographical mixtape that allows listeners to hear recordings of Kurdish artists within their historical context. Throughout the discussion, Kuruoğlu stresses the historical link between politics and Kurdish music production, following the music scene from a brief explosion during the 1970s through the years of suppression following the coup in 1980, and continuing to the slow emergence of a legal Kurdish music industry after ...

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New Texts Out Now: Madawi Al-Rasheed, Carool Kersten, and Marat Shterin, Demystifying the Caliphate

Madawi Al-Rasheed, Carool Kersten, and Marat Shterin, editors, Demystifying the Caliphate: Historical Memory and Contemporary Contexts. New York and Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2013. Jadaliyya (J): What made you put together this book? Madawi al-Rasheed (MAR): The concept of the caliphate has become a scary term invoked by both politicians and activists. Since 9/11, politicians in the West and the Muslim world invoke the word to scare constituencies or justify certain policies that often lead to war and destruction. Many politicians, among them George Bush and Tony Blair, have ...

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Tadween Roundup: News and Analysis in Publishing and Academia from the Arab World

[The following is a roundup of the latest news and analysis from the publishing world that relates to pedagogy and knowledge production. It was originally published on Tadween Publishing's blog. For more updates, follow Tadween Publishing on Facebook and Twitter.] Will the Latest Generation of Online Courses Help the Arab World? By Maha Bali (Al Fanar) MOOCs have sparked heated discussions and debates over their use in higher education, but how would they fare in the Arab world? Maha Bali, an educator at the American University in ...

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New Texts Out Now: Erdag Goknar, Orhan Pamuk, Secularism and Blasphemy: The Politics of the Turkish Novel

Erdağ Göknar, Orhan Pamuk, Secularism and Blasphemy: The Politics of the Turkish Novel. London and New York: Routledge, 2013.  Jadaliyya (J): What made you write this book? Erdağ Göknar (EG): I have both an academic and personal interest in Pamuk. I first met him when I was a graduate student and have known him for fifteen years. I am also the translator of his historical novel My Name Is Red, a book that ushered him onto a world literary stage. The translation won the International Dublin IMPAC Literary Award in 2003; Pamuk was awarded the Nobel Prize three years later. Despite ...

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Tadween Roundup: News and Analysis from the Publishing/Academic World

[The following is a roundup of the latest news and analysis from the publishing world that relates to pedagogy and knowledge production. It was originally published on Tadween Publishing's blog. For more updates, follow Tadween Publishing on Facebook and Twitter.] Publishing Penguin and Random House officially close merger to become Penguin Random House By Adi Robertson (The Verge) The highly anticipated, and feared, merger of book publishers Penguin and Random House has officially morphed into Penguin Random House. The merger has had ...

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A Potential Renaissance for Arabic Translation

[The following article was re-published on Tadween Publishing's blog in collaboration with Al Fanar. The original article can be viewed here. For more information on the publishing world as it relates to pedagogy and knowledge production, follow Tadween Publishing on Facebook and Twitter.] By Ursula Lindsey CAIRO–In an oft-cited reference, the UN-sponsored Arab Human Development Report painted a bleak picture in 2003 of the Arab cultural and academic landscape here. It described translation in Arab countries as “chaotic and static” and noted ...

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University of California Student-Workers Union on the Recent Nomination of Janet Napolitano for UC President

[The following statement was issued on 15 July 2013 by UAW Local 2865, the union representing over 12000 Academic Student Employees (ASE)—teaching assistants, readers, tutors, and others—at the nine teaching campuses of the University of California.] A Statement from UAW 2865 – UC Student-Workers Union Regarding the Recent Appointment of Ex-Homeland Security Secretary Janet Napolitano as the President of the UC As student-workers of the University of California (UC), we are shocked and troubled by the nomination of Janet Napolitano for appointment as the President of the UC. Napolitano is ...

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Turkey Media Roundup (July 17)

[This is a roundup of news articles and other materials circulating on Turkey and reflects a wide variety of opinions. It does not reflect the views of the Turkey Page Editors or of Jadaliyya. You may send your own recommendations for inclusion in each week's roundup to turkey@jadaliyya.com by Sunday night of every week.] English Istanbul Protests A public and moderated collection of news articles on the protests on Crowdvoice.org. Fifty Shades of Grey: Turkey After the Storm Oguz Işık thinks that "a new form of politics based not on polarization but on consensus building is a real ...

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New Texts Out Now: Selma Dabbagh, Out of It: A Novel

Selma Dabbagh, Out of It: A Novel. London and New York: Bloomsbury, 2012. Selected as a Guardian Book of the Year, 2011-2012. Jadaliyya (J): What made you write this book? Selma Dabbagh (SD): All writers are driven by a sense of compulsion. This compulsion has component elements of arrogance and vanity, as well as an artistic desire to put the messy rush of everyday life into a dignified, meaningful form. Out of It was my first novel, although I had published short stories previously, and the seeds of it came to me as an image and an idea. The image was of a young man leaping up on a ...

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Tadween Roundup: News and Analysis in Publishing and Academia from the Arab World

[The following is a roundup of the latest news and analysis from the publishing world that relates to pedagogy and knowledge production. It was originally published on Tadween Publishing's blog. For more updates, follow Tadween Publishing on Facebook and Twitter.] Palestine Festival of Literature: Reading across borders M. Lynx Qualey (Chicago Tribune) For the Chicago Tribune’s Printers Row, M. Lynx Qualey explains the difficulty that one young woman from Hebron, Walaa Alqasiya, faces in order to travel to sites of the Palestine ...

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New Texts Out Now: Lori Allen, The Rise and Fall of Human Rights: Cynicism and Politics in Occupied Palestine

Lori Allen, The Rise and Fall of Human Rights: Cynicism and Politics in Occupied Palestine. Palo Alto: Stanford University Press, 2013. Jadaliyya (J): What made you write this book? How does it connect to and/or depart from your previous research?    Lori Allen (LA): My original research question focused on the generative capacities of violence and suffering, which I hoped to illuminate through investigating Palestinian human rights NGOs. I understood these institutions to be a central source by which Palestinian suffering and the victimization of Palestinians by the ...

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Turkey Media Roundup (July 9)

[This is a roundup of news articles and other materials circulating on Turkey and reflects a wide variety of opinions. It does not reflect the views of the Turkey Page Editors or of Jadaliyya. You may send your own recommendations for inclusion in each week's roundup to turkey@jadaliyya.com by Sunday night of every week.] English Trouble in Paradise Slavoj Žižek doesn’t see the “Turkish protests merely as a secular civil society rising up against an authoritarian Islamist regime supported by a silent Muslim majority.” Uprisings Here, There, and Everywhere Immanuel Wallerstein writes on the ...

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Morsi and the Army: The Illusive Power

[The following excerpts are taken from Gilbert Achcar’s recently published book The People Want: A Radical Exploration of the Arab Uprising, translated by G. M. Goshgarian (London: Saqi Books and Berkeley: University of California Press, 2013). The book will be featured in an upcoming NEWTON post. These selections were chosen by the author in light of the present situation in Egypt; for more on some of these points, click here.] On 12 August 2012, [Mohamed Morsi] the new Egyptian president sent the SCAF’s two most eminent members into retirement. Both of these military men had been close ...

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Tadween Roundup: News and Analysis from the Publishing/Academic World

[The following is a roundup of the latest news and analysis from the publishing world that relates to pedagogy and knowledge production. It was originally published on Tadween Publishing's blog. For more updates, follow Tadween Publishing on Facebook and Twitter.] Unintentional Knowledge: What we find when we’re not looking By Julio Alves (The Chronicle of Higher Education) Adapting to the age of information and the accessibility of the Internet has affected the quality and originality of student research papers, says Julio Alves. ...

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New Texts Out Now: Neha Vora, Impossible Citizens: Dubai's Indian Diaspora

Neha Vora, Impossible Citizens: Dubai's Indian Diaspora. Durham: Duke University Press, 2013. Jadaliyya (J): What made you write this book? Neha Vora (NV): I have always had an interest in South Asian diasporas, particularly in the forms of identification, cultural production, and belonging that occur as people move from “homeland” to new locales—how they imagine home and how they imagine themselves and their communities in relation to others. When I entered my PhD program in anthropology in 2002, I was searching for a non-Western field site in which to study South Asian migration and ...

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New Texts Out Now: Andrew Gardner and Autumn Watts, Constructing Qatar: Migrant Narratives from the Margins of the Global System

Andrew Gardner and Autumn Watts, editors, Constructing Qatar: Migrant Narratives from the Margins of the Global System. Smashwords, 2012. Jadaliyya (J): What made you put together this book? Andrew Gardner (AG): Migrants in the Gulf states have been a central focal point in my research for more than a decade now. Over that decade, I definitely noticed that the portions of my research and my presentations that truly resonated with my audience were oftentimes not the scholarly and theoretical acrobatics that seemingly comprise so much academic activity today, but rather the migrant stories ...

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Sex, Love, and Worship in Classical Ottoman Texts: An Interview with Selim Kuru

The history of sexuality in the Islamic world is a topic of growing interest for students and scholars today, and one of the major areas of inquiry has been the development of contemporary notions such as homosexuality in Islamic societies and the context within which they are formed or introduced. This literature itself usually embraces a critique of present-day categories that reinforce heteronormativity or rigid understandings of sexual orientation that seek to objectively define sexuality, which scholars see as a fluid category to be studied within constantly changing cultural and ...

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Turkey Media Roundup (July 2)

[This is a roundup of news articles and other materials circulating on Turkey and reflects a wide variety of opinions. It does not reflect the views of the Turkey Page Editors or of Jadaliyya. You may send your own recommendations for inclusion in each week's roundup to turkey@jadaliyya.com by Sunday night of every week.] English A Digital Collection of Gezi Park Articles A collection of articles on various Gezi Park incidents and their repercussions. The March of Protest The Economist situates the protests in Turkey in the global and historical context of people’s movements, warning those ...

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Where to Find Education News on the Web

[The following article was originally published on Tadween Publishing's blog. For more information on the publishing world as it relates to pedagogy and knowledge production, follow Tadween Publishing on Facebook and Twitter.] Tadween Publishing has compiled a list of blogs and websites that feature news and analysis on education. Whether you are looking for news on how technology is being integrated into the educational system, new innovative styles of teaching, or updates on the battle for academic freedom, the following list should be your ...

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Don't Tell Them You're Studying Islam

[The following article was published in collaboration with the Center for Contemporary Arab Studies at Georgetown University on Tadween Publishing's blog. It was originally published by CCAS here. For more information on the publishing world as it relates to pedagogy and knowledge production, follow Tadween Publishing on Facebook and Twitter.] By Steven Gertz I now know what it is like to be profiled. As an American white male of German descent, this is not something to which I am accustomed. For years, I have flown internationally with very little ...

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New Texts Out Now: Evelyn Alsultany and Ella Shohat, Between the Middle East and the Americas: The Cultural Politics of Diaspora

Evelyn Alsultany and Ella Shohat, editors, Between the Middle East and the Americas: The Cultural Politics of Diaspora. Ann Arbor: University of Michigan Press, 2013. Jadaliyya (J): What made you put together this book? Evelyn Alsultany and Ella Shohat (EA & ES): Growing up in the wake of our families’ displacement from Iraq, and having lived in multiple geographies as part of complex familial mixing, we see this project as an attempt to connect what otherwise would be perceived as disparate and disjointed worlds. Gathering essays on seemingly unrelated cultural geographies under one ...

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New Texts Out Now: Rabab Abdulhadi, Evelyn Alsultany, and Nadine Naber, Arab and Arab American Feminisms

Rabab Abdulhadi, Evelyn Alsultany, and Nadine Naber, editors, Arab and Arab American Feminisms: Gender, Violence, and Belonging. Syracuse: Syracuse University Press, 2011. Jadaliyya (J): What made you put together this collection? Rabab Abdulhadi, Evelyn Alsultany, Nadine Naber (RA, EA, NN): It was a year after 11 September 2001, and the three of us were on the same panel at the American Anthropological Association in New Orleans. As we sat at Café du Monde, we noted how Arab American and Arab American feminist perspectives were virtually absent from the academic conferences in which we ...

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MOOCs Stir Controversy over Shifting Course of Higher Education

While online education has existed for a while, teaching classes online is taking the world of higher education by storm due in part to the rise of MOOCs. MOOCs (massive open online course) are courses based on lecture videos and online interaction that can, seemingly, be taken by anyone with an internet connection. They represent a new form of “open” education that meets virtually, in a non-physical space. The restrictive size and space of a college classroom does not apply in MOOCs, opening the doors for thousands to enroll in the course. Courses include quizzes, homework, exercises, and ...

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Graduate Paper Prize 2013 (Association for Gulf and Arabian Peninsula Studies)

The Association for Gulf and Arabian Peninsula Studies (AGAPS) invites university faculty to nominate graduate student research papers on the Gulf and Arabian Peninsula (inclusive of the transnational flow of people, goods, and ideas) for AGAPS’s 2013 Graduate Paper Prize.  Graduate students may also self-nominate, but include a verification letter from your faculty member of the quality of the paper and the class for which it was written. AGAPS welcome submissions from all disciplines. Papers should include an engagement with literature that concerns the study of the Arabian Peninsula, ...

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PhD Dissertation Award 2013 (Association for Gulf and Arabian Peninsula Studies)

The Association for Gulf and Arabian Peninsula Studies (AGAPS) invites recent PhD graduates to submit their dissertations for consideration for its 2013 Dissertation Award. AGAPS wishes to recognize exceptional achievement in research and writing. The deadline for submission is 1 July 2013. PhD dissertations (in English) accepted for the degree of PhD between 1 July 2012 and 30 June 2013 are eligible. AGAPS welcomes dissertations from across the disciplines and a variety of perspectives. They must primarily focus on the Gulf and Arabian Peninsula, but can be inclusive of the transnational ...

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Tadween Roundup: News and Analysis from the Publishing/Academic World

[The following is a roundup of the latest news and analysis from the publishing world that relates to pedagogy and knowledge production. It was originally published on Tadween Publishing's blog. For more updates, follow Tadween Publishing on Facebook and Twitter.] Tadween Publishing brings you the latest news and analysis from the publishing and academic worlds that relate to pedagogy and knowledge production. Crowdfunding Academic Research By Lauren Ingeno (Insider Higher Ed) With decreased federal and university research funding, ...

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Producing Pera: A Levantine Family and the Remaking of Istanbul

In recent years, urban space has emerged as a critical point of political contention in Turkey. However, this is by no means a new phenomenon. The politics of urban transformation in Istanbul—Turkey’s largest city and the capital of the former Ottoman Empire—have offered a visible representation of the dominant ideology of the times since the city’s conquest in 1453. As Ottoman sultans and statesmen sought to consciously reorient towards Europe during the nineteenth century, the largely non-Muslim neighborhood of Pera, opposite the historical peninsula on the northern side of the Golden Horn, ...

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New Texts Out Now: Markus Dressler, Writing Religion: The Making of Turkish Alevi Islam

Markus Dressler, Writing Religion: The Making of Turkish Alevi Islam. New York and Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2013. Jadaliyya (J): What made you write this book? Markus Dressler (MD): I have been working on Alevism and religion in modern Turkey on and off for more than fifteen years. During this time, I became more and more interested in the way that contemporary discourses on Alevism are informed by modern ideologies, in particular nationalism and secularism. I realized just how deeply most scholarship on Alevism is also indebted to these narratives. My initial goal was thus to ...

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New Texts Out Now: Thomas Pierret, Religion and State in Syria

Thomas Pierret, Religion and State in Syria: The Sunni Ulama from Coup to Revolution. Cambridge and New York: Cambridge University Press, 2013. Jadaliyya (J): What made you write this book? Thomas Pierret (TP): The main incentive was the dearth of scholarly literature on two issues I am interested in: the role of the ulama in contemporary societies, and Islam in Syria. Until the late 1990s, common wisdom had it that the ulama had suffered a significant decline throughout the twentieth century, to the extent that they were hardly worthy of interest for researchers. Consequently, the ...

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New Texts Out Now: Daniel Neep, Occupying Syria under the French Mandate

Daniel Neep, Occupying Syria under the French Mandate: Insurgency, Space, and State Formation. Cambridge and New York: Cambridge University Press, 2012. Jadaliyya (J): What made you write this book? Daniel Neep (DN): Scholars who work on state formation have tended to have little to say about the phenomenon of colonial violence. This seemed to me curious, given that violence is arguably the most central, and certainly the most visceral, dimension of the colonial encounter. In historical sociology, that line of scholarship on war and the state most often associated with the name of Charles ...

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Delhicentric: Zarina’s Paper Like Skin

Zarina: Paper Like Skin. Art Institute of Chicago, Chicago, IL, 26 June – 22 September, 2013. Zarina Hashmi has been based in New York City since the 1970s, producing a significant body of work over the decades that she stored in her densely packed home and studio in Chelsea. The majority of the work from the retrospective Zarina: Paper Like Skin came from the seventy-six-year-old artist’s modest studio. The sixty-some impeccably kept works, ranging from woodcuts to paper reliefs, pin drawings, and paper pulp sculptures all belied their age due to the quality of the materials used, but ...

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Tadween Roundup: News and Analysis in Publishing and Academia from the Arab World

[The following is a roundup of the latest news and analysis from the publishing world that relates to pedagogy and knowledge production. It was originally published on Tadween Publishing's blog. For more updates, follow Tadween Publishing on Facebook and Twitter.] News and stories with a focus on the publishing industry, education, and technology from across the Arab world. Information Technologies and Education in the Arab World By Rayna Stamboliyska (Nature) UNESCO released the first report to focus on the implementation of ICT ...

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New Texts Out Now: Eyad Houssami, Doomed by Hope: Essays on Arab Theatre

Eyad Houssami, editor. Doomed by Hope: Essays on Arab Theatre. Foreword by Elias Khoury. London: Pluto Press, 2012. Innana Mahkoumoun Bil Amal: Kitabat Fi Al Masrah. Beirut: Dar Al Adab, 2012. Jadaliyya (J): What led you to commission and compile this collection? Eyad Houssami (EH): As a theater director, I am always thinking about why we make theater, what plays matter where, and how to stage drama today. I also think about how characters, stories, and public dialogue—intimate, immediate, unmediated—can draw people together. One of the problems with theater today is its insularity. ...

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New Texts Out Now: Mounira Soliman and Walid El Hamamsy, Popular Culture in the Middle East and North Africa

Mounira Soliman and Walid El Hamamsy, editors, Popular Culture in the Middle East and North Africa: A Postcolonial Outlook. London and New York: Routledge, 2013. Jadaliyya (J): What made you put together this collection? Mounira Soliman and Walid El Hamamsy (MS & WH): The idea for this book came from our perceived awareness of an emerging body of popular culture in the Middle East and North Africa that needed to be examined, analyzed, and theorized. We felt that work on popular culture in this region was at best scattered, and looked down upon-- popular culture itself as being locked ...

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Summer Readings from NEWTON

The New Texts Out Now (NEWTON) page has greatly expanded over the past year, in large part thanks to the recommendations and contributions from many of Jadaliyya’s readers. We would like to provide you with ample summer reading material by reminding you of several new texts that we have featured in recent months. This compilation of works spans a wide range of topics and disciplines by prominent authors in the field of Middle East studies. We hope this list will be pedagogically useful for readers preparing syllabi for the fall semester, as well as those hoping to learn about new and unique ...

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New Texts Out Now: Mark Fathi Massoud, Law's Fragile State: Colonial, Authoritarian, and Humanitarian Legacies in Sudan

Mark Fathi Massoud, Law's Fragile State: Colonial, Authoritarian, and Humanitarian Legacies in Sudan. Cambridge and New York: Cambridge University Press, 2013. Jadaliyya (J): What made you write this book? Mark Fathi Massoud (MFM): I wrote this book to investigate the nature of the law and how law is used both to develop and to disrupt authority. I also wrote the book to understand Sudan. Sudan was the first sub-Saharan African country to achieve colonial independence from the British. Its post-independence period has been wracked by warfare, slaughter, and instability. One of ...

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New Texts Out Now: Ayca Cubukcu, The Responsibility to Protect: Libya and the Problem of Transnational Solidarity

Ayça Çubukçu, “The Responsibility to Protect: Libya and the Problem of Transnational Solidarity,” Humanitarianism and Responsibility, special issue of Journal of Human Rights 12 (2013). Jadaliyya (J): What made you write this article? Ayça Çubukçu (AÇ): This article originated in a piece I wrote for Jadaliyya during the vitalizing days of the Arab Spring, in the heat of debate about the virtues of an international military intervention in Libya. As Jadaliyya readers would recall, following the February 2011 uprising against Colonel Qaddafi in eastern Libya, there were calls for the ...

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Constantinople and Smyrna in the Diasporan Armenian and Greek Imaginaries [Part Two]

[Part One of this article can be found here.] Constantinople in Diasporan Armenian Films While artistic production in the Armenian diaspora has been nowhere near as abundant as it had been in Constantinople during the final decades of the Ottoman Empire, generations of diasporan Armenian artists—working in the Middle East, Europe, and the Americas—have been poking holes in Yessayan’s theory since the 1920s. But in recent years, diasporan Armenian filmmakers have even begun using her own symbol as proof of the invalidity of her theory. By turning modern-day Istanbul into the object of ...

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Constantinople and Smyrna in the Diasporan Armenian and Greek Imaginaries [Part One]

. . . Բայց դուն, տեսի՜լք ընտանի, հիմա ա՜յնչափ հեռացած, Ըսէ՜, իրաւ է որ ա՜լ պիտի երբեք չբացուիս Դիմացն զքեզ փնտռող իմ անսահման կարօտիս . . . ։   Դուն որ եղար, ո՜վ Պոլիս, լոյսն աչքերուս նորաբաց, Ճի՞շդ է, ըսէ՜, որ ա՜լ մենք օտարնե՜ր ենք իրարու Եւ իրաւունք չունի՜մ ես քու հողիդ մէջ թաղուելու. . . ։   [But you, familiar vision now so far away, Tell me, is it true that you will never again open your arms wide for My limitless longing that has been searching for you? You, oh Constantinople, you that became the light of my newly opened eyes, Tell me, is it true that we are ...

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Tadween Roundup: News and Analysis from the Publishing/Academic World

[The following is a roundup of the latest news and analysis from the publishing world that relates to pedagogy and knowledge production. It was originally published on Tadween Publishing's blog. For more updates, follow Tadween Publishing on Facebook and Twitter.] Tadween Publishing brings you the latest news and analysis from the publishing and academic worlds that relate to pedagogy and knowledge production. How University Admissions Distorts Some Arab Societies By Elizabeth Buckner (Al Fanar) Elizabeth Buckner takes a look at ...

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New Texts Out Now: Louise Cainkar, Global Arab World Migrations and Diasporas

Louise Cainkar, “Global Arab World Migrations and Diasporas.” Arab Studies Journal Vol. XXI No. 1 (Spring 2013). Jadaliyya (J): What made you write this article? Louise Cainkar (LC): This article was developed from a keynote speech I delivered at the Conference on Arab World Migrations and Diasporas, organized by Georgetown University’s Center for Contemporary Arab Studies. When contemplating the keynote, I considered deeply what my particular contribution would be to a room full of multi-disciplinary scholars of Arab migrations and diasporas. I decided to focus on constructing a global ...

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Picturing Algeria

Pierre Bourdieu, Picturing Algeria. Edited by Franz Schultheis and Christine Frisinghelli. New York: Columbia University Press, 2012. [This review was originally published in the most recent issue of Arab Studies Journal. For more information on the issue, or to subscribe to ASJ, click here.] In a poignant interview included in Picturing Algeria, Pierre Bourdieu notes that “Yvette Delsaut wrote a text about me in which she very rightly says that Algeria is what allowed me to accept myself.” Indeed, in recent years, Bourdieu’s early fieldwork in Algeria has been regarded as central to his ...

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Academic Freedom and the Middle East: A Handbook for Teaching and Research

The Middle East is a region that is continuously in the news and frequently the focus of controversial, polarizing, and sometimes virulent debate within both policy and media circles. Scholars working on the Middle East face a unique set of challenges in their teaching and research. What they have to say, and how they say it, is often subjected to intense scrutiny by those with vested political or ideological interests. Such extra-scholarly pressures can pose serious threats to academic freedom and exercising professional responsibility. In light of these circumstances, the Taskforce on ...

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New Texts Out Now: Joel Beinin, Mixing, Separation, and Violence in Urban Spaces and the Rural Frontier in Palestine

Joel Beinin, “Mixing, Separation, and Violence in Urban Spaces and the Rural Frontier in Palestine.” Arab Studies Journal Vol. XXI No. 1 (Spring 2013). Jadaliyya (J): What made you write this article? Joel Beinin (JB): It grew out of a conference on late Ottoman Palestine at the University of Lausanne. I was invited to make a link between the democratic possibilities opened by the 1908 Young Turk Revolution and the state of affairs one hundred years later. We tend to think we have made a lot of progress since then. With respect to the question of co-existence of the ethno-national and ...

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The Arab Studies Journal's Twentieth Anniversary Issue

[Jadaliyya will be posting excerpts from the Arab Studies Journal's Twentieth Anniversary issue. What follows is the Editor's Note and Table of Contents from that issue.] Editor’s Note We can scarcely believe that two decades have passed since the publication of the first issue of the Arab Studies Journal. We are proud and humbled to have published groundbreaking work by scholars at the onset of their careers as well as at the pinnacle. During the last twenty years, the Journal has taken part in extraordinary changes in the field of Middle Eastern studies: paradigm shifts (and, on ...

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The Least of All Possible Evils: Humanitarian Violence from Arendt to Gaza

Eyal Weizman, The Least of All Possible Evils: Humanitarian Violence from Arendt to Gaza. New York: Verso, 2011. [This review was originally published in the most recent issue of Arab Studies Journal. For more information on the issue, or to subscribe to ASJ, click here.] In that historical moment after the September 11 terrorist attacks, American politicians and pundits launched a debate about whether torture should be employed to combat terror. Those who endorsed the use of torture, and even some conflicted torture opponents, affirmed the consensus view that torture is unequivocally ...

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The Poorer Nations: A Possible History of the Global South

Vijay Prashad. The Poorer Nations: A Possible History of the Global South. Forward by Boutros Boutros-Ghali. London and New York: Verso, 2012. Correct ideas are never sufficient; they are not believed or enacted simply because they are right. They become the ideas of the time only when they are wielded by those who have a united belief in their own power, using it in ideological and institutional struggles that, in turn, consolidate their social authority. - Vijay Prashad, The Poorer Nations On 15 November 1975, the leaders of the newly formed G7 met at Chateau de Rambouillet, the French ...

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Amidst a Violent Conflict, Syria’s Students Struggle for an Education

[The following article was originally published on Tadween Publishing's blog. For more information on the publishing world as it relates to pedagogy and knowledge production, follow Tadween Publishing on Facebook and Twitter.] In a rare public appearance, Bashar Asad visited Damascus University on 4 May to dedicate a statue to the martyrs from Syrian universities who have been killed in the country’s two-year ongoing violence. While Asad’s appearance is undoubtedly a calculated political move, there is no question that the state of ...

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New Texts Out Now: Wendy Pearlman, Emigration and the Resilience of Politics in Lebanon

Wendy Pearlman, “Emigration and the Resilience of Politics in Lebanon.” Arab Studies Journal Vol. XXI No. 1 (Spring 2013). Jadaliyya (J): What made you write this article? Wendy Pearlman (WP): Five years ago I began to read widely about Lebanon in preparation for a trip there. While there are so many fascinating things about the country, I was most intrigued by its one hundred and fifty-year history with international emigration. There is hardly a corner of the globe in which Lebanese have not settled, and the worldwide diaspora of Lebanese origin outnumbers those living within Lebanon’s ...

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New Texts Out Now: Simon Jackson, Diaspora Politics and Developmental Empire: The Syro-Lebanese at the League of Nations

Simon Jackson, “Diaspora Politics and Developmental Empire: The Syro-Lebanese at the League of Nations.” Arab Studies Journal Vol. XXI No. 1 (Spring 2013). Jadaliyya (J): What made you write this article? Simon Jackson (SJ): The article draws on my current book project, provisionally titled Mandatory Development: The Global Politics of Economic Development in the Colonial Middle East. The book is about the socioeconomic development regime in French Mandate Syria-Lebanon between the world wars, considered at a variety of scales, from the local to the imperial, international, and global. This ...

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Juridical Humanity: A Colonial History

Samera Esmeir, Juridical Humanity: A Colonial History. Stanford: Stanford University Press, 2012. [This review was originally published in the most recent issue of Arab Studies Journal. For more information on the issue, or to subscribe to ASJ, click here.] Today human rights provides a dominant framework for thinking about humanity—one in which humanity often appears as both a universal and an ahistorical category. In this view, the history of humanity is one of the discovery of otherwise hidden or ignored truths about its nature. One can easily understand the apparent political and moral ...

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New Texts Out Now: Charles Tripp, The Power and the People: Paths of Resistance in the Middle East

Charles Tripp, The Power and the People: Paths of Resistance in the Middle East. Cambridge and New York: Cambridge University Press, 2013. Jadaliyya (J): What made you write this book? Charles Tripp (CT): The origins of the book lay initially in my feeling that a great deal of space had been devoted to the analysis of elites, the resilience of regimes, and the dominance of the state in the Middle East. This is perfectly understandable and has produced some outstanding studies. However, there did seem to be room for a book that tried to examine the other side of the coin: the ways in ...

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Technology in the Classroom: The Big Brother E-Book

[The following article was originally published on Tadween Publishing's blog. For more information on the publishing world as it relates to pedagogy and knowledge production, follow Tadween Publishing on Facebook and Twitter.] Students are often faced with pages upon pages of reading as part of the curriculum handed to them by their professors. Traditionally, in order to gauge whether or not students are reading books and articles, professors either turn to asking questions in the classroom or assigning papers and essays on the allocated ...

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The Roundup: News and Analysis in Publishing/Academia from the Arab World

[The following is a roundup of the latest news and analysis from the publishing world that relates to pedagogy and knowledge production. It was originally published on Tadween Publishing's blog. For more updates, follow Tadween Publishing on Facebook and Twitter.] News and stories with a focus on the publishing industry, education, and technology from across the Arab world. Gaza’s Academics Face Censorship in Classroom By Asmaa Al-Ghoul (Al-Monitor) "Previously, the Israeli security department used to monitor academic ...

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Reflections of the 21st Annual Cairo Papers Symposium, “The Political Economy of the New Egyptian Republic”

Cairo has long been a tremendously self-aware city—engaging both Egyptian and international scholars in dialogues about events even as they are unfolding. This year’s twenty-first Annual Cairo Papers Symposium is an example of such self-conscious scholarship and dialogue. Taking place on 6 April 2013, as protests around the city commemorated the fifth anniversary of the April 6th workers’ movement, this symposium on the Egyptian political economy was certainly timely and relevant. The Cairo Papers in Social Science (CPSS) hosted the Cairo Papers Annual Symposium. The CPSS was established in ...

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The Arab Studies Journal Celebrates Twenty Years: An Interview with Bassam Haddad, Sherene Seikaly, and Nadya Sbaiti

On 19 April 2013, the Center for Contemporary Arab Studies (CCAS) at Georgetown University hosted a reception celebrating the twentieth anniversary of the Arab Studies Journal (ASJ). As the journal’s managing editor since September 2011, I used this milestone as an occasion to interview the founding editor Bassam Haddad and co-editors Sherene Seikaly and Nadya Sbaiti about the history of the journal, how it has developed, and where the editors see it going. Lizette Baghdadi (LB): How did the Arab Studies Journal begin? Bassam Haddad (BH): I was a young graduate student at Georgetown ...

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Beyond the PDF 2 Conference: Revolutionizing Academic Publishing

[The following article was originally published on Tadween Publishing's blog. For more information on the publishing world as it relates to pedagogy and knowledge production, follow Tadween Publishing on Facebook and Twitter.] New technology has created a multitude of avenues through which academics, scholars, publishers, librarians, and other related fields can communicate. The challenge, however, is using such technology to communicate effectively and change old habits that no longer seem to be working. This is a challenge that the ...

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The End of an Era: The Less than Grand Opening of the New Ottoman Archives

[The following status update on the new Ottoman Archive Center in Kağıthane was written by Patrick Adamiak, Jeffery Dyer, and Michael Christopher Low.] For generations, historians of the Ottoman Empire and its former territories in the Balkans and the Arab Middle East participated in a rite of passage linking them to the Ottoman bureaucrats they studied. Going to work at the Ottoman Archives (Başbakanlık Osmanlı Arşivi) entailed the humbling experience of passing through the famous gates at Bab-ı Ali, or as it came to be known in the West, the Sublime Porte. During Ottoman times, Bab-ı Ali ...

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Tadween Roundup: News and Analysis from the Publishing/Academic World

[The following is a roundup of the latest news and analysis from the publishing world that relates to pedagogy and knowledge production. It was originally published on Tadween Publishing's blog. For more updates, follow Tadween Publishing on Facebook and Twitter.] Tadween Publishing brings you the latest news and analyses from the publishing and academic worlds that relates to pedagogy and knowledge production. Book experts weigh in on the publishing industry’s revolution (The Washington Post) With the publishing industry changing ...

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New Texts Out Now: Chouki El Hamel, Black Morocco: A History of Slavery, Race, and Islam

Chouki El Hamel, Black Morocco: A History of Slavery, Race, and Islam. Cambridge and New York: Cambridge University Press, 2013. Questions by Brahim El Guabli Brahim El Guabli (BEG): Why Black Morocco: A History of Slavery, Race, and Islam? Chouki El Hamel (CEH): Written history about Morocco is generally silent regarding slavery and racial attitudes, discrimination, and marginalization, and paints a picture of Morocco as free from such social problems. Such problems are usually associated more with slavery and its historical aftermath in the United States. Slavery and racial questions ...

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Derrida and the Crisis of French Zionism

The life’s work of Jacques Derrida, often referred to by the name “deconstruction,” advanced a new way of reading. Emphasizing the deferral of meaning and the production of irreducible differences within the major concepts of European thought, Derrida’s thought was enormously controversial, particularly for its political implications. The complexity of deconstruction resists biographical interpretation, while Derrida’s life experiences undoubtedly affected its insights. He occasionally spoke of his unusual youth as a Jewish boy in French colonial Algeria, and linked this outsider status to ...

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Theorizing the Arabian Peninsula: Introduction to the Roundtable

This electronic roundtable marks the one-year anniversary of Jadaliyya's Arabian Peninsula Page, in which time we have hosted work by activists, journalists, artists, and scholars that has made a significant intellectual—and, we hope, political—contribution. Despite the sophisticated, critical, and oft-politically engaged literature emerging from and about the Arabian Peninsula, however, the region remains marginalized, in multiple ways, within academic and popular analyses. Theorizing the Arabian Peninsula thus addresses the ways in which frameworks of knowledge production have not only ...

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Theorizing the Arabian Peninsula Roundtable: Thinking Globally About Arabia

[This is one of seven contributions in Jadaliyya's electronic roundtable on the symbolic and material practices of knowledge production on the Arabian Peninsula. Moderated by Rosie Bsheer and John Warner, it features Toby Jones, Madawi Al-Rasheed, Adam Hanieh, Neha Vora, Nathalie Peutz, John Willis, and Ahmed Kanna.] (1) Historically, what have the dominant analytical approaches to the study of the Arabian Peninsula been? How have the difficulties of carrying out research in the Arabian Peninsula shaped the ways in which knowledge is produced for the particular country/ies in which you ...

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Theorizing the Arabian Peninsula Roundtable: Knowledge In the Time of Oil

[This is one of seven contributions in Jadaliyya's electronic roundtable on the symbolic and material practices of knowledge production on the Arabian Peninsula. Moderated by Rosie Bsheer and John Warner, it features Toby Jones, Madawi Al-Rasheed, Adam Hanieh, Neha Vora, Nathalie Peutz, John Willis, and Ahmed Kanna.] (1) Historically, what have the dominant analytical approaches to the study of the Arabian Peninsula been? How have the difficulties of carrying out research in the Arabian Peninsula shaped the ways in which knowledge is produced for the particular country/ies in which you ...

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Theorizing the Arabian Peninsula Roundtable: Unpacking Knowledge Production and Consumption

[This is one of seven contributions in Jadaliyya's electronic roundtable on the symbolic and material practices of knowledge production on the Arabian Peninsula. Moderated by Rosie Bsheer and John Warner, it features Toby Jones, Madawi Al-Rasheed, Adam Hanieh, Neha Vora, Nathalie Peutz, John Willis, and Ahmed Kanna.]   (1) Historically, what have the dominant analytical approaches to the study of the Arabian Peninsula been? How have the difficulties of carrying out research in the Arabian Peninsula shaped the ways in which knowledge is produced for the particular country/ies in which ...

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Theorizing the Arabian Peninsula Roundtable: Perspectives from the Margins of Arabia

[This is one of seven contributions in Jadaliyya's electronic roundtable on the symbolic and material practices of knowledge production on the Arabian Peninsula. Moderated by Rosie Bsheer and John Warner, it features Toby Jones, Madawi Al-Rasheed, Adam Hanieh, Neha Vora, Nathalie Peutz, John Willis, and Ahmed Kanna.] (1) Historically, what have the dominant analytical approaches to the study of the Arabian Peninsula been? How have the difficulties of carrying out research in the Arabian Peninsula shaped the ways in which knowledge is produced for the particular country/ies in which you ...

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New Texts Out Now: Adel Iskandar and Bassam Haddad, Mediating the Arab Uprisings

Adel Iskandar and Bassam Haddad, editors, Mediating the Arab Uprisings. Washington, DC: Tadween Publishing, 2013. Jadaliyya (J): What made you write this book? Adel Iskandar and Bassam Haddad (AI & BH): The idea for this book grew out of the splendid contributions to Jadaliyya from a number of authors who offered interventions on the role of media in the uprisings. With a dearth of critical examinations about the media and the representation of these movements, it became increasingly urgent to challenge some of the prevalent assertions circulating widely.  Unlike our authors, our ...

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From High to Low and Back Again: A Fish Above Sea Level

Samak fawqa satah al-bahr [A Fish above Sea Level]. Directed by Hazim Bitar. Jordan, 2012. Recently I had the opportunity to view the independent film Samak fawqa satah al-bahr (A Fish above Sea Level) at the University of Jordan. This is the first feature-length film by Hazim Bitar, who both wrote and directed it. He is a prominent presence in the Jordanian film community, having produced more than six shorts, both narrative-driven and documentary, in addition to founding the (now suspended) Amman Filmmakers Cooperative, which provided an array of support (including equipment, distribution, ...

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New Texts Out Now: David McMurray and Amanda Ufheil-Somers, The Arab Revolts

David McMurray and Amanda Ufheil-Somers, editors, The Arab Revolts: Dispatches on Militant Democracy in the Middle East. Bloomington: Indiana University Press, 2013. Published in association with Middle East Research and Information Project (MERIP). Jadaliyya (J): What made you compile this volume? David McMurray & Amanda Ufheil-Somers (DM & AU): MERIP recently published an edited volume with Verso on just the events in Egypt, examining the initial eighteen days of the uprising as well as looking back on the political and social shifts of the previous two decades that gave shape to ...

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New Texts Out Now: Esam Al-Amin, The Arab Awakening Unveiled

Esam Al-Amin, The Arab Awakening Unveiled: Understanding Transformations and Revolutions in the Middle East. Washington, DC: American Educational Trust, 2013. Jadaliyya (J): What made you write this book, and how would you describe it? Esam Al-Amin (EA): The Arab Awakening Unveiled: Understanding Transformations and Revolutions in the Middle East is a collection of essays about the Arab uprisings and awakening movement, arguably the most important phenomenon that has taken place in the Middle East in the past century. I hope that the book provides thoughtful analysis and a keen ...

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The Perils for Academic Freedom in the Arab World

[The following article was originally published on Tadween Publishing's blog. For more information on the publishing world as it relates to pedagogy and knowledge production, follow Tadween Publishing on Facebook and Twitter.] Calls for change have swept across the Arab world since the uprisings erupted over two years ago. While the process and struggle for political and social freedoms continue, freedom in the world of academia has become a recent, although not new, target in the region. In late February, a conference on the status of ...

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NEWTON in Focus: Thinking Through Gender and Sex

This week we highlight various NEWTON texts relevant to the study of gender and sexuality. The authors of these texts write from a wide range of perspectives, approaching questions relevant to the MENA region from a variety of cultural and political contexts and (inter)disciplinary approaches. We encourage you to integrate these texts into your curricula in the coming semesters. If you wish to recommend a book or peer-reviewed article for a feature in NEWTON—on any topic relevant to the region—please email us at reviews@jadaliyya.com. To stay up to date with ongoing discussions by ...

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Battle for the .book Domain

Amazon has come under critical fire recently in the publishing world for its attempt to take control of generic top-level domains (gTLD) that end in .book, .author, and .read. The Authors Guild, the Association of American Publishers, and Amazon rival Barnes & Noble have all taken issue with Amazon’s pursuit of the domain names. By allowing Amazon to have the monopoly on such domain names would give them greater and unchecked authority over the presence of the publishing world on the internet.   The increase in the number of domains, which means new suffixes such as .com and ...

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Melancholia and the Possibility of a Geopolitics of Mourning

Nouri Gana, Signifying Loss: Toward a Poetics of Narrative Mourning. Lewisburg: Bucknell University Press, 2011. In the preface to his recent book, Signifying Loss, Nouri Gana argues that “[i]n a world marked by the swift and sanitized infliction of loss and suffering, especially as a result of the insidious banalization of global warfare and everyday violence,” “signifying loss is crucial to adjusting to a persistently mutating and alienating reality and, simultaneously, to carrying out sociopolitical changes.” Indeed, the opening claim implicitly yet clearly announces that the following ...

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New Texts Out Now: Rashid Khalidi, Brokers of Deceit: How the US Has Undermined Peace in the Middle East

Rashid Khalidi, Brokers of Deceit: How the US Has Undermined Peace in the Middle East. Boston: Beacon Press, 2013. Jadaliyya (J): What made you write this book? Rashid Khalidi (RK): I had long wanted to use the large number of documents—position papers, minutes of meetings, internal memos, official proposals, and so forth—that I had collected as an advisor to the Madrid and Washington Palestinian-Israeli negotiations from 1991-1993, but I never found the right opportunity to do so. The research of one my graduate students on American policy during the 1970s and 1980s revealed a trove of ...

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Reading Poetry in Tehran: The Case of the Forbidden

Sholeh Wolpé, The Forbidden: Poetry from Iran and Its Exiles. East Lansing: Michigan State University Press, 2012.  La redonda, suprema y celestial sandía Es la fruta del árbol de la sed Es la ballena verde del verano At a Chilean food market in Santiago, a young fruit vendor hums verses in praise of watermelons: “Watermelon: round, supreme and celestial / it’s the fruit of the tree of thirst / it’s the green whale of summer.” The poem’s eloquent simplicity and creative metaphors pique the curiosity of a passerby who decides to eavesdrop in the corner. The boy does not ...

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When I Saw You

Lamma Shoftak [When I Saw You]. Directed by Annemarie Jacir. Jordan-Palestine-UAE-Greece, 2012. Annemarie Jacir’s Lamma Shoftak/When I Saw You extends her examination of exile and occupation begun in her début feature Milh Hadha al-Bahr [Salt of This Sea] (2008), as well as her earlier shorts and documentaries. Salt of This Sea takes the 1948 Nakba (catastrophe) as a moment of collective trauma through which Soraya (Suheir Hammad), a young Palestinian American woman from Brooklyn (and Jaffa), attempts to recover her dignity sixty years after her grandparents became refugees. When I Saw You ...

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New Texts Out Now: Vijay Prashad, The Poorer Nations: A Possible History of the Global South

Vijay Prashad, The Poorer Nations: A Possible History of the Global South, with a preface from Boutros Boutros Ghali. London and New York: Verso and New Delhi: LeftWord, 2013. Jadaliyya (J): What made you write this book? Vijay Prashad (VP): When I finished The Darker Nations, I felt that the last section was not adequate. That book, published in 2007, told the story of the Third World Project from 1927-8 (the League Against Imperialism meeting in Brussels) to 1983 (the Non-Aligned Movement summit in Delhi). It gave an account of the complex and hopeful elements of the Project—the fight to ...

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New Texts Out Now: Paul Aarts and Francesco Cavatorta, Civil Society in Syria and Iran

Paul Aarts and Francesco Cavatorta, editors, Civil Society in Syria and Iran: Activism in Authoritarian Contexts. Boulder, CO: Lynne Rienner, 2013. Jadaliyya (J): What made you put together this book? Paul Aarts and Francesco Cavatorta (PA & FC): We started collaborating in early 2009 on a project looking at civil society dynamics in the Middle East and North Africa. We were not entirely satisfied with the mainstream understanding of civil society activism and its natural or inevitable link to democratization. This was particularly true for traditional civil society organizations ...

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New Texts Out Now: Amr Adly, State Reform and Development in the Middle East: Turkey and Egypt in the Post-Liberalization Era

Amr Adly, State Reform and Development in the Middle East: Turkey and Egypt in the Post-Liberalization Era. London and New York: Routledge, 2012. Jadaliyya (J): What made you write this book? Amr Adly (AA): The book is based on my PhD dissertation that I completed in September 2010 at the European University Institute in Florence. I specialized in political economy, and decided to write my thesis on the political economy of the Middle East in general, and Egypt in particular. My choice had to do with finding alternatives to culturalist approaches to studying the region, which usually ...

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New Texts Out Now: Rachel Beckles Willson, Orientalism and Musical Mission: Palestine and the West

Rachel Beckles Willson, Orientalism and Musical Mission: Palestine and the West. Cambridge and New York: Cambridge University Press, 2013. Jadaliyya (J): What made you write this book?  Rachel Beckles Willson (RBW): In 2004, I was puzzled by the way that the English press—specifically newspapers that are usually rather critical, The Guardian and The Observer—responded to some western classical music initiatives in Ramallah led by the celebrated conductor Daniel Barenboim. It all seemed to be wildly admiring, while also reproducing imperialistic discourses about Arabs and Europe ...

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New Texts Out Now: Ilana Feldman, The Challenge of Categories: UNRWA and the Definition of a "Palestine Refugee"

Ilana Feldman, "The Challenge of Categories: UNRWA and the Definition of a 'Palestine Refugee.'" Journal of Refugee Studies 25.3 (2012). Jadaliyya (J): What made you write this article?  Ilana Feldman (IF): There were two primary motivating forces for writing this article. First, it is part of a special issue in the Journal of Refugee Studies on “The Refugee in the Post-War World, 1945-1960,” that itself was a result of a conference of the same name. By participating in this issue, and by placing the Palestinian refugee experience within the broader landscape of ...

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On the UAE's Decision to Refuse Entry to Professor Kristian Coates

This past Thursday, 28 February 2013, I was supposed to go to Dubai. The trip was to attend a one-day workshop on Sunday, 3 March 2013 in which the Alexandria Trust was expected to launch "al-Fanar,” a new publication devoted to the state of higher education in the Arab world. However, given the recent decision by the government of the United Arab Emirates (UAE) to deny entry to Professor Kristian Coates Ulrichsen of the London School of Economics (LSE), the whole launch was cancelled.  Dr. Ulrichsen was supposed to give a paper on Bahrain in a conference organized by the American ...

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NEWTON in Focus: Egypt

This week we highlight various NEWTON texts relevant to the study of Egypt. The authors of these texts write from a wide range of perspectives and approach questions with which Egypt has grappled, not only in the wake of Tahrir, but throughout its modern existence. We encourage you to integrate these texts into your curricula in the coming semesters. If you wish to recommend a book or peer-reviewed article for a feature in NEWTON—whether on Egypt or on any other topics relevant to the region—please email us at reviews@jadaliyya.com. To stay up to date with ongoing discussions by ...

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New Texts Out Now: Jeannie Sowers, Environmental Politics in Egypt: Activists, Experts, and the State

Jeannie Sowers, Environmental Politics in Egypt: Activists, Experts, and the State. London and New York: Routledge, 2012. Jadaliyya (J): What made you write this book? Jeannie Sowers (JS): In Egypt, as elsewhere, environmental issues are often viewed as secondary to issues of “high politics,” such as national elections and debates among political elites. Yet so many of the core concerns of politics—power, resources, justice—are most clearly seen in who has access to land, health, water, and other essential services and goods. “Environmental” concerns, broadly conceived, are thus central to ...

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New Texts Out Now: Dina Rizk Khoury, Iraq in Wartime: Soldiering, Martyrdom, and Remembrance

Dina Rizk Khoury, Iraq in Wartime: Soldiering, Martyrdom, and Remembrance. Cambridge and New York: Cambridge University Press, 2013. Jadaliyya (J): What made you write this book? Dina Rizk Khoury (DRK): The 2003 US invasion of Iraq was the chief impetus for writing this book. I had been about halfway through writing a book on the politics of reform and rebellion in Ottoman Baghdad when the build-up for the 2003 invasion began. Ottoman Baghdad receded very quickly from my focus. I was frustrated as a historian and as an opponent of the war with the way that Iraq was reduced to a set of ...

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New Texts Out Now: Na'eem Jeenah, Pretending Democracy: Israel, An Ethnocratic State

Na’eem Jeenah, editor, Pretending Democracy: Israel, An Ethnocratic State. Johannesburg: Afro-Middle East Centre, 2012. Jadaliyya (J): What made you publish this book? Na’eem Jeenah (NJ): The book emerged out of a conference organized by the Afro-Middle East Centre and which was held in Pretoria, South Africa. The conference brought together important scholars who have being thinking and writing about the issue of the nature of the Israeli state, those who are affected by this, and also ways in which to move beyond the ethnocratic state that Israel is towards a future that can address the ...

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New Texts Out Now: Sally K. Gallagher, Making Do in Damascus

Sally K. Gallagher, Making Do in Damascus: Navigating a Generation of Change in Family and Work. Syracuse: Syracuse University Press, 2012. Jadaliyya (J): What made you write this book? Sally Gallagher (SG): I have had a long interest in gender and economic development, and had the opportunity to begin a study of the effects of participating in an income-generating project for women in Damascus just as it was getting started. This was a really great opportunity to watch change in the making, rather than go in after the fact and ask people: how is your life different? Slowly I was able to ...

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New Texts Out Now: Natalya Vince, Saintly Grandmothers: Youth Reception and Reinterpretation of the National Past in Contemporary Algeria

Natalya Vince, “Saintly Grandmothers: Youth Reception and Reinterpretation of the National Past in Contemporary Algeria.” The Journal of North African Studies, 18:1 (2013). Jadaliyya (J): What made you write this article? Natalya Vince (NV): The Algerian War of Independence (1954-62), or at least a selective and glorified version of the war, has played a key role in both the formation of Algerian national identity and the legitimization of political elites. For the past fifty years, museums, monuments, school textbooks, national holidays, and political speeches have constantly reminded ...

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Why Students in Solidarity with Palestine Should Not Join The Olive Tree Initiative

The Olive Tree Initiative (OTI) calls itself a “conflict analysis” project. Started in 2007 at the University of California Irvine, it is now present at multiple UC campuses. OTI is often referred to as a “dialogue project,” and its mission statement reads as follows: The mission of the Olive Tree Initiative (OTI) is to promote conflict analysis and resolution through Experiential Education by providing students and community with the education, training, and experiences needed to better negotiate and solve conflicts. This might sound like an admirable venture at first. However, ...

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New Texts Out Now: January 2013 Back to School Edition

As we kick off the spring 2013 semester, Jadaliyya would like to remind you of some of the most creative and groundbreaking works in Middle East studies that we have featured in our New Texts Out Now (NEWTON) page. Since we launched this page in 2011, we have had the opportunity to share with you unique interviews by authors and excerpts from their new and forthcoming publications. Here you will find a list divided by topic of some of these texts that you may find particularly useful pedagogically. We encourage you to integrate these into your curricula during this semester and beyond. To ...

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New Texts Out Now: John M. Willis, Unmaking North and South: Cartographies of the Yemeni Past, 1857-1934

John M. Willis, Unmaking North and South: Cartographies of the Yemeni Past, 1857-1934. New York: Columbia University Press, 2012. Jadaliyya (J): What made you write this book? John Willis (JW): The book began as a dissertation written in the departments of history and Middle Eastern and Islamic studies at New York University. While I had been interested in the production and mastery of space as a particular technic of power for some time, what drove me to frame the dissertation and then the book in the way that I did was my experience watching the state celebrations associated with the ...

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New Texts Out Now: Paolo Gerbaudo, Tweets and the Streets: Social Media and Contemporary Activism

Paolo Gerbaudo, Tweets and the Streets: Social Media and Contemporary Activism. London and New York: Pluto Books, 2012. Jadaliyya (J): What made you write this book? Paolo Gerbaudo (PG): I have been involved in progressive social movements in Italy and the UK for the last twelve years, some times as a participant, other times as a journalist for il manifesto, a newspaper of the Italian New Left, other times as a social movement researcher, and still other times as an organizer. Thus, the first reason for writing this book for me was a strong sense of commitment to, and solidarity with, ...

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New Texts Out Now: Madawi Al-Rasheed, A Most Masculine State: Gender, Politics, and Religion in Saudi Arabia

Madawi Al-Rasheed, A Most Masculine State: Gender, Politics, and Religion in Saudi Arabia. Cambridge and New York: Cambridge University Press, 2013. Jadaliyya (J): What made you write this book? Madawi Al-Rasheed (MAR): First, the banality of superficial opinions on Saudi women that is so pervasive. In the public sphere, especially in the West, Saudi women are either superstars or victims of their own society and religion. I felt it was time to contribute to this debate from an academic perspective. I do not want to write a book that celebrates the achievement of Saudi women, seeks pity, or ...

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New Texts Out Now: Noga Efrati, Women in Iraq: Past Meets Present

Noga Efrati, Women in Iraq: Past Meets Present. New York: Columbia University Press, 2012. Jadaliyya (J): What made you write this book? Noga Efrati (NE): The US-led invasion of Iraq became a full-scale military occupation while I was in the midst of working on a historical account of women under the British occupation and the British-installed monarchy in the first half of the twentieth century. I found myself more and more intrigued, as contemporary events cascaded, to find that the struggle of Iraqi women’s rights activists, especially between 2003 and 2005, to a large extent revolved ...

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New Texts Out Now: Nicola Pratt, The Gender Logics of Resistance to the "War on Terror"

Nicola Pratt, "The Gender Logics of Resistance to the 'War on Terror': Constructing Sex-Gender Difference Through the Erasure of Patriarchy in the Middle East." Third World Quarterly 33:10 (2012). Jadaliyya (J): What made you write this article? Nicola Pratt (NP): This article is based on fieldwork conducted in 2007 and 2008 at the “Cairo Conferences,” which were a series of conferences in opposition to imperialism, Zionism, neoliberalism, and dictatorship. Initially, I attended the 2007 Cairo Conference as an anti-war activist. At this time, the US and its allies were occupying ...

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New Texts Out Now: Lisa Hajjar, Torture: A Sociology of Violence and Human Rights

Lisa Hajjar, Torture: A Sociology of Violence and Human Rights. New York: Routledge, 2012 [“Framing Twenty-First Century Social Issues” series]. Jadaliyya (J): What inspired you to write this book? Lisa Hajjar (LH): Torture is my great and terrible obsession. I think, read, write, and talk about torture all the time, as anyone who knows me can attest. I was inspired to write this book in order to share my knowledge, my passion, and—to be blunt—my anger about torture with college students, although hopefully people who are not students also will find it interesting. This book, like others in ...

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NEWTON Author Nergis Ertürk Receives MLA First Book Prize

We are very happy to report that Nergis Ertürk, whose book Grammatology and Literary Modernity in Turkey was featured in New Texts Out Now (NEWTON) in 2012, is the recipient of the Nineteenth Annual Modern Language Association Prize for a First Book. She will receive the award, together with the other winners of 2012 MLA publication prizes, on 5 January at the 2013 Annual MLA Convention in Boston. This gives us the opportunity to congratulate four other 2012 NEWTON authors who were also awarded major prizes for their books: Rochelle Davis, whose book Palestinian Village Histories: ...

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New Texts Out Now: Orit Bashkin, New Babylonians: A History of Jews in Modern Iraq

Orit Bashkin, New Babylonians: A History of Jews in Modern Iraq. Palo Alto: Stanford University Press, 2012. Jadaliyya (J): What made you write this book? Orit Bashkin (OB): I became interested in the topic as a teenager, reading Hebrew novels written by Iraqi Jews who described their experiences in Iraq. When I was working on my first book I met Iraqi Jews who spoke to me about their experiences in Iraq, and Iraqi Muslims and Christians who spoke about their Jewish friends and neighbors. What amazed me about some of these conversations was the personal memories of Iraqi Jews now living ...

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New Texts Out Now: Marwan M. Kraidy, The Revolutionary Body Politic

Marwan M. Kraidy, “The Revolutionary Body Politic: Preliminary Thoughts on a Neglected Medium in the Arab Uprisings.” Middle East Journal of Culture and Communication 5.1 (2012). Jadaliyya (J): What made you write this article? Marwan Kraidy (MK): I received an invitation from the editors to write an essay with a brutal time frame (if I recall correctly, an author had dropped out two weeks before the copy deadline, and I was asked to fill in). But that was just technical. What really made me write the article was that I had been preoccupied with the implications of Alia al-Mahdy’s action ...

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NEWTON 2012 in Review

We have had the opportunity to highlight an extraordinary series of books and articles on New Texts Out Now this year. Before we make our way into the new year, here are all of the NEWTONs that we published in 2012. Enjoy, and see you in 2013.  Myriam Ababsa, Badouin Dupret, and Eric Denis, Popular Housing and Urban Land Tenure in the Middle East: Case Studies from Egypt, Syria, Jordan, Lebanon, and Turkey  Lila Abu-Lughod and Anupama Rao, Women’s Rights, Muslim Family Law, and the Politics of Consent  Gilbert Achcar, “Eichmann in Cairo: The Eichmann Affair in Nasser’s ...

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New Texts Out Now: Amahl Bishara, Back Stories: US News Production and Palestinian Politics

Amahl A. Bishara, Back Stories: US News Production and Palestinian Politics. Palo Alto: Stanford University Press, 2012. Jadaliyya (J): What made you write this book? Amahl Bishara (AB): Back Stories is an ethnography of the production of US news during the second Palestinian Intifada. I started this project in New York City around the beginning of the uprising. I would wake up every morning, and my first step would be to reach for the news. But obviously the news represented only a narrow slice of Palestinian ideas about and experiences of national struggle. I wanted to explore the ...

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كتاب: أمراء وسماسرة وبيروقراطيون: النفط والدولة في السعودية

[“كتب” هي سلسلة تستضيف “جدلية” فيها المؤلفين والمؤلفات في حوار حول أعمالهم الجديدة ونرفقه بفصل من الكتاب.]  "أمراء، وسماسرة، وبيروقراطيون: النفط والدولة في المملكة العربية السعودية". تأليف ستيفان هيرتوغ مطبعة جامعة كورنل، 2011. صدر بالإنجليزية.   جدلية: ما الذي دفعك لكتابة هذا الكتاب؟ ستيفان هيرتوغ: كانت الفكرة الأصلية وراء هذا البحث هي تحليل كيف أن الاصلاحات الاقتصادية الليبرالية تغير الهياكل الاقتصادية والسياسية في دولة غنية بالنفط ( ريعية) مثل المملكة العربية السعودية. كانت هذه هي الخطة قبل أن أبدأ في بحثي الميداني، ولكن ما اكتسبته من خبرة غير ...

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New Texts Out Now: Laleh Khalili, Time in the Shadows: Confinement in Counterinsurgencies

Laleh Khalili, Time in the Shadows: Confinement in Counterinsurgencies. Palo Alto: Stanford University Press, 2012. Jadaliyya (J): What made you write this book? Laleh Khalili (LK): In the course of completing my first book, I was performing some final interviews with Palestinian residents in Lebanon who had been detainees in Israel at various points over the last couple of decades. I was conducting these interviews when the news of Abu Ghraib tortures broke and pictures of detainees being held by leashes, of dogs attacking detainees, of the sexualized torture emerged. More than one ...

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New Texts Out Now: Nadje Al-Ali and Deborah Al-Najjar, We Are Iraqis: Aesthetics and Politics in a Time of War

Nadje Al-Ali and Deborah Al-Najjar, editors, We Are Iraqis: Aesthetics and Politics in a Time of War. Syracuse: Syracuse University Press, 2012. Jadaliyya (J): What made you write this book? Nadje Al-Ali and Deborah Al-Najjar (NA and DA): The idea for this book first emerged in 2006, when Iraqis were generally portrayed either as passive victims or as perpetrators of horrific violence. In the midst of an ongoing humanitarian crisis and the violence, destruction, killings, and widespread sufferings inside Iraq, we did not hear the voices of contemporary Iraqis. While media and academicians ...

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New Texts Out Now: Elisabeth Weber, Living Together: Jacques Derrida's Communities of Violence and Peace

Elisabeth Weber, editor, Living Together: Jacques Derrida’s Communities of Violence and Peace. New York: Fordham University Press, 2012. Jadaliyya (J): What made you put together this collection? Elisabeth Weber (EW): The volume was conceived after the conference I organized with my colleague Thomas Carlson in October 2003 at the University of California at Santa Barbara, on “Irreconcilable Differences? Jacques Derrida and the Question of Religion.” The conference turned out to be Jacques Derrida’s last public appearance in the United States. The collection of essays is grouped around ...

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New Texts Out Now: Ann Elizabeth Mayer, Islam and Human Rights

Ann Elizabeth Mayer, Islam and Human Rights: Tradition and Politics, Fifth Edition. Boulder, CO: Westview Press, 2012. Jadaliyya (J): What made you write this book? Ann Elizabeth Mayer (AEM): Many things have changed in the Middle East and North Africa (MENA) region since the first edition of this book, published in the mid-1980s, examined proposed “Islamic” versions of human rights. I wanted to update the earlier versions of this book to take into account new developments in the ongoing contention about Islam and human rights, which has intensified in the wake of the crushing of the ...

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New Texts Out Now: Mark LeVine and Gershon Shafir, Struggle and Survival in Palestine/Israel

Mark LeVine and Gershon Shafir, editors. Struggle and Survival in Palestine/Israel. Berkeley: University of California Press, 2012. Jadaliyya (J): What made you write this book? Mark LeVine (ML): I first came up with the idea for the book after teaching Terry Burke's seminal volume Struggle and Survival in the Modern Middle East in a modern Middle East lecture course during the same quarter I was teaching my Israel/Palestine course. I realized that while there were very important advances in scholarship on the conflict and its histories, students were easily overwhelmed by the ...

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New Texts Out Now: The Dawn of the Arab Uprisings: End of an Old Order?

Bassam Haddad, Rosie Bsheer, and Ziad Abu-Rish, editors. The Dawn of the Arab Uprisings: End of an Old Order? London: Pluto Press, 2012.   Jadaliyya (J): What made you write this book? Bassam Haddad, Rosie Bsheer, and Ziad Abu-Rish (BRZ): This volume is primarily comprised of articles that were originally published on Jadaliyya during the first six to nine months of the Arab uprisings. As the initial phase of the uprisings subsided, counter-revolution set in, and grand narratives crystallized, we thought it was important to reflect, remember, and share—in a sense, to ...

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Putting Palestine on the Map

They want their homeland? They should fight for it. -- Ali Khaled, father of Leila Khaled, 1950s With the US embroiled in Afghanistan’s endless theater, the debate around insurgencies has once more taken hold. In 2007, Jeffery Record’s Beating Goliath detailed the story of how some insurgencies end up defeating their much more powerful adversaries. Three years later, the RAND Corporation published Ben Connable and Martin Libicki’s How Insurgencies End, which showed that such struggles last for ten years, giving the stubborn Goliath the best odds if they are able to quell public opinion in ...

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New Texts Out Now: Jens Hanssen, Kafka and Arabs

Jens Hanssen, “Kafka and Arabs.” Critical Inquiry (Autumn 2012).            Jadaliyya (J): What made you write this article? Jens Hanssen (JH): I have been carrying a dog-eared photocopy of Kafka’s three-page animal story “Schakale und Araber” in my luggage ever since a friend of mine at the German Institute in Beirut handed it to me to read. This was back in 1998, and I remember that when I read it I knew I would return to it one day. I think for anyone concerned about the tragedy of Palestine, Kafka’s story resonates. It is ...

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New Texts Out Now: Norman Finkelstein, Knowing Too Much

Norman G. Finkelstein, Knowing Too Much: Why the American Jewish Romance with Israel Is Coming to an End. New York: OR Books, 2012. Jadaliyya (J): What made you write this book? Norman Finkelstein (NF): I have been active on the Israel-Palestine conflict for the past three decades. I first got involved on 6 June 1982 when Israel invaded Lebanon. Although I was almost never allowed to teach the Israel-Palestine conflict (I mostly taught political theory), my research and publications have focused on it. I also used to visit the occupied Palestinian territories annually until Israel banned me ...

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New Texts Out Now: Linda Herrera, Youth and Citizenship in the Digital Age: A View from Egypt

Linda Herrera, “Youth and Citizenship in the Digital Age: A View from Egypt.” Harvard Educational Review (Fall 2012). Jadaliyya (J): What made you write this article? Linda Herrera (LH): Schools once served as temples of citizenship education, but this is no longer the case. I came to the realization of the diminished role of schooling in the lives of young Egyptians during a visit to a public high school in 2006. I arrived at a school in the Delta in the middle of the day to interview teachers about curriculum reforms. What I found was a school populated by the teaching and administrative ...

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NEWTON Year in Review

Since we first launched our New Texts Out Now (NEWTON) page a little more than a year ago,  we have had the opportunity to feature an astonishing range of books and articles for Jadaliyya readers. With authors generously agreeing to discuss their new works, offer background information on their research, and allow us to post excerpts from their books and articles, we have been able to offer first looks at some of the most important new work in the field, from established names and rising stars alike. This seemed like an opportune moment to look back at the previous year and offer a ...

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New Texts Out Now: Rikke Hostrup Haugbolle and Francesco Cavatorta, Beyond Ghannouchi: Social Changes and Islamism in Tunisia

Rikke Hostrup Haugbølle and Francesco Cavatorta, "Beyond Ghannouchi: Social Changes and Islamism in Tunisia," Middle East Report 262 (Spring 2012). Jadaliyya (J): What made you write this article? Rikke Hostrup Haugbølle and Francesco Cavatorta (RHH and FC): In October 2011, Tunisia had the first elections after the uprising that had led Ben Ali to flee the country. The months prior to the elections were very confusing and no one really knew whether elections would take place at all. At the same time, it was a very exciting period for the country and those like us who had been ...

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Jadaliyya's First Book is Now Available from Pluto Press

Jadaliyya Co-Editors are excited to announce the release of The Dawn of the Arab Uprisings: End of An Old Order?, published by Pluto Press. This book is the first publication produced by the Arab Studies Institute, co-edited by Jadaliyya Editors, and featuring Jadaliyya contributors. The volume is currently available in paperback and Kindle format at these and other locations: In the US: Macmillan and Amazon US In the UK: Pluto Press and Amazon UK                    About the Book The Dawn of the Arab ...

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New Texts Out Now: Ali Abdullatif Ahmida, Libya, Social Origins of Dictatorship, and the Challenge for Democracy

Ali Abdullatif Ahmida, "Libya, Social Origins of Dictatorship, and the Challenge for Democracy." North African Revolutions, special issue of The Journal of the Middle East and Africa 3.1 (2012) Jadaliyya (J): What made you write this article? Ali Ahmida (AA): This article was inspired by the democratic revolutionary uprising in the Arab World, especially Libya, the least known country. Also, I wanted to go beyond the orientalist and the colonial filtering and categories by bringing in the historical, comparative, and post-colonial context. For example, Libya’s colonial genocide ...

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Turkish Fragments

Orhan Pamuk, The Museum of Innocence. Translated by Maureen Freely. New York: Knopf, 2009. Nurdan Gürbilek, The New Cultural Climate in Turkey: Living in a Shop Window. Translated by Victoria Holbrook. London: Zed Books, 2011. The year 2009 brought us an English translation of the Turkish Nobel Laureate Orhan Pamuk’s The Museum of Innocence; the year 2011, a translation of Nurdan Gürbilek’s The New Cultural Climate in Turkey: Living in a Shop Window. Gürbilek is an equally prominent figure in Turkey, the recipient of awards including the 2010 Erdal Öz and 2011 Cevdet Kudret Literature ...

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New Texts Out Now: Myriam Ababsa, Baudouin Dupret, and Eric Denis, Popular Housing and Urban Land Tenure in the Middle East

Myriam Ababsa, Baudouin Dupret and Eric Denis, editors. Popular Housing and Urban Land Tenure in the Middle East: Case Studies from Egypt, Syria, Jordan, Lebanon, and Turkey. Cairo and New York: The American University in Cairo Press, 2012. Jadaliyya (J): What made you write this book? Myriam Ababsa (MA), Baudouin Dupret (BD), and Eric Denis (ED): The first impulse behind this book came out of Eric Denis’ and Baudouin Dupret’s collaboration during the nineties at the French Institute in Cairo (CEDEJ), when the former conducted major research on urbanization and the latter on legal ...

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Inaugural Issue of Journal on Postcolonial Directions in Education

Postcolonial Directions in Education is a peer-reviewed open access journal produced twice a year. It is a scholarly journal intended to foster further understanding, advancement and reshaping of the field of postcolonial education. We welcome articles that contriute to advancing the field. As indicated in the editorial for the inaugural issue, the purview of this journal is broad enough to encompass a variety of disciplinary approaches, including but not confined to the following: sociological, anthropological, historical and social psychological approaches. The areas embraced include ...

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What a Seven Day Teachers' Strike Can Accomplish: Key Contract Issues

On 10 September 2012, approximately twenty-nine thousand members of the Chicago Teachers Union began a seven-day strike protesting a host of encroachments on their rights as workers and educators on the part of the Chicago Board of Education. While various news reports have detailed the final contract agreement, the chart below (published by the Chicago Tribune on 18 September) highlights the issues that were on the table and the movement in the board's positions that were achieved through the strike and attendant negotiations. Certainly, there remains much to be analyzed regarding the ...

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New Texts Out Now: Steffen Hertog, Princes, Brokers, and Bureaucrats: Oil and the State in Saudi Arabia

Steffen Hertog, Princes, Brokers, and Bureaucrats: Oil and the State in Saudi Arabia. Ithaca: Cornell University Press, 2011. Jadaliyya (J): What made you write this book? Steffen Hertog (SH): The original idea behind the research project was to analyze how liberalizing economic reforms were changing the social and political structures of an oil-rich (or “rentier”) state like Saudi Arabia. That was the plan before I did my fieldwork, but my experience there pretty much turned the whole thing on its head. Instead of change, I found deep historical continuities in the way politics and ...

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New Texts Out Now: Julie Carlson and Elisabeth Weber, Speaking about Torture

Julie Carlson and Elisabeth Weber, editors. Speaking about Torture. New York: Fordham University Press, 2012. Jadaliyya (J): What made you put together this collection? Julie Carlson (JC) and Elisabeth Weber (EW): This is the first book to take up the issue of torture from the array of approaches offered by the arts and humanities. In the post 9/11 era, our volume seeks to challenge the surprisingly widespread acceptance of state-sanctioned torture among Americans, including academics and the media entertainment complex. Speaking about Torture claims that the concepts and techniques ...

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Grappling with Israel: From Sontag to Lacan and the Maoists in Between

Susan Sontag, Promised Lands. Poland/France, 1974. Groupe Cinéma Vincennes, L’Olivier. France/Palestine, 1976. Mike Hoolboom, Lacan Palestine. Canada, 2012. In 1973, Susan Sontag, the visual critic and essayist, traveled to the Middle East to film in Israel, just before the end of the October War that saw Egypt and Syria uniting to launch a surprise attack in retaliation for the colossal losses of the 1967 war. To watch Susan Sontag's Promised Lands in April 2012 as part of the London Palestine Film Festival, playing to a full house, is a testament to the changing mode of representing ...

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When the Lights Go Out: A Discussion with David Theo Goldberg

David Theo Goldberg is the Director of the University of California Humanities Research Institute, a professor at the University of California, Irvine, and one of the world’s leading figures in Critical Race Theory. Ten years ago he started SECT (the summer Seminar in Experimental Critical Theory). From 29 July - 9 August, the eighth session of SECT was held in Beirut, Lebanon on the theme of “Spaces of Resistance.” What follows is a conversation I conducted with David Theo Goldberg during the Seminar, intercut with my reflections as a participant in SECT VIII. Ten days discussing critical ...

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NEWTONs You Might Have Missed

With a new semester on the horizon, NEWTON is about to kick into high gear once again. Below are a few amazing posts that you might have missed the first time around. If you wish to recommend a book to be reviewed or if you have just published a book or a peer-reviewed article, please email us at reviews@jadaliyya.com Mohamed Daadaoui, Moroccan Monarchy and the Islamist Challenge: Maintaining Makhzen Power Ziad Fahmy, Ordinary Egyptians: Creating the Modern Nation through Popular Culture Belén Fernández, The Imperial Messenger: Thomas Friedman at Work Amal N. Ghazal, Islamic ...

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New Texts Out Now: Jason Brownlee, Democracy Prevention: The Politics of the US-Egyptian Alliance

Jason Brownlee, Democracy Prevention: The Politics of the US-Egyptian Alliance. Cambridge and New York: Cambridge University Press, 2012. Jadaliyya (J): What made you write this book? Jason Brownlee (JB): I had a series of experiences in 2009 that got me thinking about the intersection of US foreign policy and human rights abuses in Egypt. First, I was in Egypt in January 2009, during the massive protests against Operation Cast Lead (Israel's military assault on the Gaza Strip, which ended just before Obama took office). The demonstrations eclipsed in size anything organized by Kefaya (the ...

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Aesthetic Politics: Iranian Performance and the Challenge of Modernity

Amir Baradaran, Marry Me to the End of Love. Cite internationale des Artes, Paris, France, 23-30 June 2012. Curated by Feri Daftari.   Not often is a performance as variegated in its political significance or as generous to critical exposition as Amir Baradaran's recent interactive piece, Marry Me to the End of Love. Inserting itself into current debates surrounding the politics of marriage and Islam in relation to Western modernity, as well as the origin and viability of aesthetic politics, the performance allows us to consider art not merely in its capacity to ...

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Exile and Memory in Contemporary Western Armenian Literature

A thick stack of black and white photographs flutters to the floor. A man stands over the jumbled pile and, looking past bent corners and nibbled edges, sees dozens of faces staring up at him. These faces are vaguely familiar—an old neighbor, a distant cousin, an aunt who used to spend summers with him. Some photos land face down and, from his height, the man can just make out the names and dates scribbled in purple ink across the backs. He kneels down and, with the tips of his fingers, quickly rakes the photographs into a haphazard mound. He leans over it to inspect the faces more closely ...

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Cinematic Occupation

Kamal Aljafari, Port of Memory. France/Germany/UAE/Palestine, 2009. In the state of siege, time becomes place Fossilized in its eternity In the state of siege, place becomes time Lagging behind its yesterday and its tomorrow —Mahmoud Darwish, “State of Siege” Kamal Aljafari’s film Port of Memory (2009) opens with a long tracking shot of a grand, decaying house at twilight. The camera lingers on the skin of this structure that bears traces of other times and previous inhabitations. The footage feels like a memorial for a building that may not live much longer: we see a floorboard of what ...

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New Texts Out Now: Khaled Furani, Silencing the Sea: Secular Rhythms in Palestinian Poetry

Khaled Furani, Silencing the Sea: Secular Rhythms in Palestinian Poetry. Stanford: Stanford University Press, 2012. Jadaliyya (J): What made you write this book? Khaled Furani (KF): Growing up in thrall to Israeli policies aimed at diluting and obliterating the Palestine that was, I saw in Arabic poetry “what remains,” to quote from Hannah Arendt’s reminiscences of the Germany she once knew (reverberating in Ghassan Kanafani’s novella and Walid Khalidi’s compendium). In the Arab world, poetry has played the kind of role that perhaps blues and jazz have held in black history in the United ...

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New Texts Out Now: James Gelvin, The Arab Uprisings: What Everyone Needs to Know

James Gelvin, The Arab Uprisings: What Everyone Needs to Know. New York and Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2012. Jadaliyya (J): How did you come to write this book? James Gelvin (JG): In the winter of 2011, I made contact with Oxford University Press about doing a condensed, “trade” (i.e., mass market) version of my The Modern Middle East: A History. I thought this would be useful because, among other things, the book lays out the historical background for the Arab uprisings we were witnessing. The press was not particularly interested in that project, but one of the editors did ask me ...

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New Texts Out Now: Akram Khater, Embracing the Divine: Gender, Passion, and Politics in the Christian Middle East

Akram Fouad Khater, Embracing the Divine: Gender, Passion, and Politics in the Christian Middle East. Syracuse: Syracuse University Press, 2011. Jadaliyya (J): What made you write this book? Akram Khater (AK): This book was partly a happenstance, and came partly out of a keen awareness of a gaping hole in Middle Eastern scholarship. The happenstance is common enough in scholarly research. Tired of the texts I was reading at the Bibliotheque Nationale for my PhD dissertation, I turned to the Arabic card catalog to browse for interesting manuscripts. I stumbled upon one titled Aghrab imra’a ...

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Artist Call: NEWSFEED: Anonymity & Social Media in African Revolutions and Beyond (New York, 16 July Deadline)

Museum of Contemporary African Diasporan Arts 80 Hanson Place, Brooklyn, New York 11217 | p. 718.230.0492 | f. 718.230.0246 Important Dates: July 16, 2012: Submission deadline August 1, 2012: Artists announced via e-mail and web Exhibition Dates: October, 2012 – January, 2013 Exhibition Theme Be it in New York, Paris, or Bamako, the world is experiencing a paradigm shift that began in Africa. Worldwide, members of the financial and racial majority are no longer satisfied with matriculating into a web of systems designed to benefit only the most privileged individuals and nations. ...

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NEWTONs You Might Have Missed

After taking a brief summer vacation, New Texts Out Now (NEWTON) will return next week. In the meantime, here are a few great posts that you might have missed from the past few months: Lila Abu-Lughod and Anupama Rao, editors, Women’s Rights, Muslim Family Law, and the Politics of Consent Betty S. Anderson, The American University of Beirut: Arab Nationalism and Liberal Education Stephen W. Day, Regionalism and Rebellion in Yemen: A Troubled National Union  Nergis Ertürk, Grammatology and Literary Modernity in Turkey Pascale Ghazaleh, editor, Held in Trust: Waqf in the Islamic ...

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New Texts Out Now: Hamid Dabashi, The Arab Spring: The End of Postcolonialism

Hamid Dabashi, The Arab Spring: The End of Postcolonialism. London and New York: Zed Books, 2012. Jadaliyya (J): What made you write this book? Hamid Dabashi (HD): As you well know, a massive set of revolutionary uprisings are sweeping across North Africa and Western Asia, from Morocco to Syria and from Bahrain to Yemen. This is all happening in the aftermath of an equally important uprising code-named the Green Movement in Iran. While the Arab uprisings were under way, the Eurozone crisis and civil unrest swept across Europe from Greece to Spain, and before that was completely registered ...

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The Space Between

The Space Between: A Panorama of Cinema in Turkey. 27 April – 10 May 2012, Film Society of Lincoln Center, New York, NY. Introducing “The Space Between: A Panorama of Cinema in Turkey,” a major retrospective of Turkish cinema featuring twenty-nine films from 1958 to the present recently screened in New York City, Richard Peña, the revered director of the Film Society at Lincoln Center, noted that he first proposed the idea of a major series on Turkish cinema when he was hired in 1987. It took twenty-five years for this vision to be realized; easily the largest retrospective of Turkish ...

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New Texts Out Now: Maaike Voorhoeve, Family Law in Islam

Maaike Voorhoeve, editor, Family Law in Islam: Divorce, Marriage and Women in the Muslim World. London and New York: I. B. Tauris, 2012. Jadaliyya (J): What led you to edit this book? Maaike Voorhoeve (MV): When I started my PhD on the contemporary application of Tunisian family law by Tunisian judges, my idea was as follows: the Tunisian family code deviates significantly from Islamic law, and therefore it is interesting to examine if judges apply the code, or whether they apply Islamic law instead. This approach was informed by other studies on family law in the Muslim world that focus on ...

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Poetry of the Taliban

Alex Strick van Linschoten and Felix Kuehn, editors. Foreword by Faisal Devji. Poetry of the Taliban. London: Hurst & Co. Ltd., 2012. Since there is already a substantial discussion surrounding this compilation of poetry "of" the Taliban, it seems important to review the work within a series of broader contexts. Writing on Afghanistan has recently enjoyed an upsurge, but this is not the first such spike of western interest in Afghanistan. Amid a major catalog that has emerged over the past decade, there is a slowly growing subset of work that examines representations of ...

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New Texts Out Now: Hilal Elver, The Headscarf Controversy: Secularism and Freedom of Religion

Hilal Elver, The Headscarf Controversy: Secularism and Freedom of Religion. New York and Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2012. Jadaliyya (J): What made you write this book?  Hilal Elver (HE): My experience in Turkey in relation to the headscarf is the main reason for writing the book. Turkey is very much a divided society: ninety-nine percent of the population is Muslim and it is a significantly religious society, yet it has also developed a secular legal order and social structure. I felt this duality even in my own family environment. My mother was an educated woman and a devout ...

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"We Didn't Know It Was Impossible, So We Did It": The Quebec Student Strike Celebrates Its 100th Day

Origins of an unlimited general strike (“grève générale illimitée”) Students in Quebec are marking their hundredth day of an unlimited general strike on Tuesday, 22 May, the culmination of the most stunning mass protest movement of recent months and North America’s largest student movement in years. In fact, the mobilizations in Quebec might just be Canada's Arab Spring. Students have been organizing against tuition hikes for nearly one and a half years, when the Quebec government first proposed to raise tuition fees by seventy-five percent over five years (amended to eighty-two percent ...

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The Melancholia of a Generation

Mohammed Achaari, al-Qaws wa-al-farashah. al-Dar al-Bayda’: al-Markaz al-Thaqafi al-ʻArabi, 2010. Mohammed Achaari is not new to Morocco’s literary scene; though The Arch and the Butterfly (al-Qaws wa-al-farashah) is only his second novel, he is the author of nine collections of poetry, a collection of short stories, and has served as both Minister of Culture and president of the Moroccan Writer’s Union. The brief synopses that accompanied the announcement of his selection as one of two recipients of the 2011 International Prize for Arabic Fiction (popularly known as the Arabic Booker) for ...

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The Andalus Test: Reflections on the Attempt to Publish Arabic Literature in Hebrew

Should a visitor from another planet happen to arrive here and look around at the reality between the Jordan River and the Mediterranean Sea without the usual lenses of distortion, she would see that in Israel/Palestine—the land stretching from the river to the sea which has been under one rule for over forty years—almost half the population is Palestinian Arab and Arabic is their mother tongue, as well as that of nearly half of the Israeli Jewish population. Should our guest distinguish—as does the Israeli Central Bureau of Statistics, as well as the Israeli academy and media—between Israeli ...

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New Texts Out Now: Past Is Present: Settler Colonialism in Palestine

Omar Jabary Salamanca, Mezna Qato, Kareem Rabie, and Sobhi Samour, editors. Past Is Present: Settler Colonialism in Palestine. Special Issue of settler colonial studies 2.1 (2012). Jadaliyya (J): What made you put together this special issue? Editors (E): This open-access (and therefore freely accessible) special issue emerges out of a conference we organized in early March 2011, convened by the SOAS Palestine Society. The impetus for the conference came from two main directions. First, we all work on one aspect of Palestine or another, and each of us has grown distressed by the tendency to ...

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New Texts Out Now: Amy Motlagh, Burying the Beloved: Marriage, Realism, and Reform in Modern Iran

Amy Motlagh, Burying the Beloved: Marriage, Realism, and Reform in Modern Iran. Palo Alto: Stanford University Press, 2011. Jadaliyya (J): What made you write this book? Amy Motlagh (AM): Part of the study of literature is obsessive re-reading. In this case, I became preoccupied with what I felt was a narrow translation of a word in the English edition of Sadeq Hedayat’s The Blind Owl (which is perhaps the only Persian novel to achieve the status of a work of “world literature”), giving rise to an interpretation of the novel that seemed to conceal some of the complexities of how this could ...

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New Texts Out Now: Roger Owen, The Rise and Fall of Arab Presidents for Life

Roger Owen, The Rise and Fall of Arab Presidents for Life. Cambridge: Harvard University Press, 2012. Jadaliyya (J): What made you write this book? Roger Owen (RO): I was intrigued by news reports from Algeria in the spring of 2009 stating that President Abdel-Aziz Bouteflika of Algeria was going to amend the constitutional term limits in order to allow him become, in effect, president life, as Ben Ali and other Arab republican presidents had done before him. This led me on to consider the whole phenomenon of personalized presidential power, which did not seem to me to have been properly ...

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New Texts Out Now: Mohammad Salama and Rachel Friedman, Locating the Secular in Sayyid Qutb

Mohammad Salama and Rachel Friedman, “Locating the Secular in Sayyid Qutb.” Arab Studies Journal Vol. XX No. 1 (Spring 2012). Jadaliyya (J): What led you to write this article? Mohammad Salama and Rachel Friedman (MS and RF): The post-revolutionary political scene in Egypt, with at least fourteen Islamist parties vying for power, is a timely historical moment to take a close look at the dynamics of religious authority versus the so-called secular. As the Egyptian people succeeded in overthrowing Mubarak’s dictatorship, the importance of popular discourses asserts itself strongly. Our ...

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Degrees of Incarceration

When I started shooting for what would become Degrees of Incarceration in 2003, I had no idea that it would entail anything more than a day’s work. I showed up with a camera because a dear friend and colleague asked if I had a day to document a youth play about prisons. I ended up spending the night (leaving Bethlehem by public transportation after 4pm was impractical, my new friends told me) and then regularly returning to the youth center that organized the play. As I got to know the activists who worked on the play, I heard about the night arrest raids that stunned the camp awake on a ...

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Capitalism and Class in the Gulf Arab States

Adam Hanieh, Capitalism and Class in the Gulf Arab States. New York: Palgrave Macmillan, 2011. [This review was originally published in the most recent issue of Arab Studies Journal. For more information on the issue, or to subscribe to ASJ, click here.] What if capitalists in a particular country could draw on a reserve army of semi-skilled labor that includes hundreds of millions of noncitizens whom they could import, hire, fire and expel at will, without worrying about laws, regulations, and collective action? What if they could perfect labor market segmentation to a degree whereby only ...

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The Free University of New York City (1 May 2012)

Free University in Solidarity with May 1 General Strike New York, NY (27 April 2012): This May Day, a coalition of students and faculty from Brooklyn College, Columbia University, the CUNY Graduate Center, Eugene Lang College, Hunter College, New School for Social Research, New York University, the Occupy University, and Princeton University are collaborating to produce a “collective educational experiment” to be held on Tuesday, 1 May from 10am to 3pm. The action is in solidarity with Occupy Wall Street’s call for a General Strike and a day without the 99%.  This day-long ...

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Urban Space in Contemporary Egyptian Literature

Mara Naaman, Urban Space in Contemporary Egyptian Literature: Portraits of Cairo. New York: Palgrave Macmillan, 2011. [This review was originally published in the most recent issue of Arab Studies Journal. For more information on the issue, or to subscribe to ASJ, click here.] In January and February of 2011, Egyptians descended upon public squares throughout the country to bring an end to the thirty-year regime of Husni Mubarak. For those eighteen days—and on many other occasions throughout the following year—the people of Egypt wrested control of public space from the physical and ...

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New Texts Out Now: Gilbert Achcar, Eichmann in Cairo: The Eichmann Affair in Nasser's Egypt

Gilbert Achcar, “Eichmann in Cairo: The Eichmann Affair in Nasser's Egypt.” Arab Studies Journal Vol. XX No. 1 (Spring 2012). Jadaliyya (J): What made you write this article? Gilbert Achcar (GA): The story of this article resembles that of my book The Arabs and the Holocaust, of which it can be seen as a sequel. In both cases, the initial impulse of writing was not the evolution of my ongoing research, but a fortuitous circumstance. The prelude to the book was a request made to me a few years ago to write a chapter on the Arab reception of the Holocaust for a multivolume work in Italian. ...

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ArteEast Presents Two Literary Events Featuring Poets from Gaza (New York, 24 & 25 April 2012)

April 24 at 7pm: Gazan Writers Salon 1: Fractured Web, Gazan Writing Online at Columbia Center for Palestine Studies, Knox Hall Room 509, Columbia University, 606 West 122 Street, New York, NY 10027. Free and open to the public. April 25 at 7pm: Gazan Writers Salon 2: From Memoir to Reportage and Back Again, a literary reading at Nuyorican Poets Cafe 236 E. 3rd St., New York, NY 10009. Advance tickets $10 (click here to order), $15 at the door. Sponsored by ArteEast. ArteEast is pleased to present a two-part series of literary readings and discussion, the Gazan Writers Salons, ...

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Outside Looking In

City of Mirages: Baghdad 1952-1982. The Center for Architecture, 536 LaGuardia Place, New York, NY, 22 February – 5 May 2012. City of Mirages: Baghdad 1952-1982 is an exhibit of design work produced by world-famous architects and firms for the booming Iraqi capital during the mid-twentieth century. Beginning from the year that the Iraq Development Board was established to channel seventy percent of state oil revenues into modernizing schemes for national development, the exhibit traces a thirty-year timeline of foreign architectural practice in Baghdad. Pedro Azara of the Universitat ...

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New Texts Out Now: Farzaneh Milani, Words, Not Swords: Iranian Women Writers and the Freedom of Movement

Farzaneh Milani, Words, Not Swords: Iranian Women Writers and the Freedom of Movement. Syracuse: Syracuse University Press, 2011. Jadaliyya (J): What made you write this book? Farzaneh Milani (FM): In a way, Words, not Swords is a rebuttal to my first book, Veils and Words. The central argument of Veils and Words revolved around Iranian women's literary output. I claimed that the veil had covered not only Iranian women's bodies, but also their literary voices. Women's self-expression, either bodily or verbal, I surmised, was covered by the material veil and its verbal ...

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Something of Palestine Emerges

2012 London Palestine Film Festival. 20 April – 3 May 2012. For more information and a complete schedule of films, click here. Each year, for the two weeks of the London Palestine Film Festival, there are a bunch of people whose social life for that fortnight becomes the festival. Others dip in and out, while still others see a Palestinian film or a film about Palestine perhaps for the first time. Each year the program is rich and eclectic, ranging from animations to documentaries to features, from conventional to experimental. Here I consider six films out of the more than fifty works to ...

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New Texts Out Now: Junaid Rana, Terrifying Muslims: Race and Labor in the South Asian Diaspora

Junaid Rana, Terrifying Muslims: Race and Labor in the South Asian Diaspora. Durham: Duke University Press, 2011. Jadaliyya (J): What made you write this book? Junaid Rana (JR): My book was borne out of ethnographic research I completed on the role of labor migration in the global economy. I started with some basic questions: why do people become labor migrants, how does labor migration become transnational and global, what are the conditions that lead to labor migration, and how are labor migrants treated abroad? Each of these questions led to complex answers driven by fieldwork I ...

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Art and Subversion: An Interview with Omar Kholeif

Subversion. Featuring work by Akram Zaatari, Joana Hadjithomas and Khalil Joreige, Khaled Hafez, Larissa Sansour, Marwa Arsanios, Sharif Waked, Sherif El-Azma, Tarzan and Arab, and Wafaa Bilal. Curated by Omar Kholeif. Cornerhouse, 70 Oxford Street, Manchester, UK. 14 April - 5 June 2012, preview/symposium 13 April 2012. [Omar Kholeif is Curator of Subversion, a large-scale exhibition and public program, which runs until 5 June 2012 at Cornerhouse, Manchester, UK. More about Omar Kholeif here; follow him on Twitter here.] Anthony Alessandrini (AA): What was the idea behind this show, and ...

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Sonia M'Barek: A Musical Innovator Rooted in Tradition

Sonia M’Barek, Proshansky Auditorium, City University of New York Graduate Center, New York, NY, 23 March 2012. In traditional Arabic music, a vocalist is not just referred to as a singer, but is instead spoken of as a mutrib/mutribah. Literally translated, they are the people who bring tarab, or musical ecstasy. As such, the craft of a traditional Arabic vocalist is a demanding one. The singer must possess a pleasing voice, have clear diction, and sing impeccably in tune, all while comfortably navigating the Arabic maqam (mode) scales, whose intervals are smaller than the ones in Western ...

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New Texts Out Now: Nelly Hanna, Artisan Entrepreneurs in Cairo and Early Modern Capitalism (1600-1800)

Nelly Hanna, Artisan Entrepreneurs in Cairo and Early Modern Capitalism (1600-1800). Syracuse: Syracuse University Press, 2011. Jadaliyya (J): What made you write this book, and what particular topics, issues, and literatures does it address? Nelly Hanna (NH): The book is part of a large body of literature that deals with the artisans and guilds of the Ottoman Empire. Scholars have written about artisans in Istanbul, Bursa, Aleppo, and Jerusalem (including Suraiya Faroqhi, Abdul Karim Rafeq, Haim Gerber, and others). More specifically, my work on with the artisans in Cairo follows the ...

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How the PA Enriched an Elite and Normalized Occupation

Khalil Nakhleh, Globalized Palestine: The National Sell-Out of a Homeland. Trenton, NJ: The Red Sea Press, Inc., 2011. Globalized Palestine: The National Sell-Out of a Homeland explores the rise of a new Palestinian elite that works together with international organizations against the will of the majority of its compatriots. The book’s author, Khalil Nakhleh, worked in the development sector as director of the Welfare Association (a Palestinian organization) for more than a decade, as well as a consultant on the expenditure of European Union aid. He witnessed first-hand the marriage of the ...

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NEWTONs You Might Have Missed

Since we have featured so much remarkable work in New Texts Out Now (NEWTON), we wanted to pause for a second to let you catch up. Here are a few great posts that you might have missed from the past several months: Nadje Al-Ali and Nicola Pratt, "Between Nationalism and Women's Rights: The Kurdish Women's Movement in Iraq" Paul Amar, “Middle East Masculinity Studies: Discourses of ‘Men in Crisis,’ Industries of Gender in Revolution” James L. Gelvin, The Modern Middle East: A History, Third Edition and The Arab Uprisings: What Everyone Needs to Know Amal N. Ghazal, Islamic Reform ...

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Threads of Narrating the Arab Spring

“Narrating the Arab Spring,” Cairo University, 18-20 February 2012 Many of us have spoken and thought about those who we wished would have been present to witness—and perhaps participate in—the revolutions. People we have known and loved, and people we have known from a distance. A woman stands up in a plenary at the “Narrating the Arab Spring” conference simply to say she would have loved it if Edward Said were here; she would have loved to hear and read what he had to say “about what is his revolution also.” It is a moving moment; the room breaks into applause. Organized by the English ...

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Amman Critical Language Scholarship: Integrating Language and Culture

Following the September 11 attacks, the US government designated a number of languages as “critical need languages”; Arabic was and still is, of course, on top of the list. In order to ensure enough Americans are learning these “critical need languages” and to ensure higher proficiency levels and deeper understandings of target cultures, the US government established the Critical Languages Scholarship (CLS) program. Administered by the Department of State’s Bureau of Educational and Cultural Affairs with partner institutions, CLS students spend seven to ten  weeks in the ...

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How Not to Study Gender in the Middle East

One: Gender is not the study of what is evident, it is an analysis of how what is evident came to be. Two: Before resolving to write about gender, sexuality, or any other practice or aspect of subjectivity in the Middle East, one must first define what exactly the object of study is. Be specific. What country, region, and time period forms the background picture of your study? Furthermore, the terms “Middle East,” “the Islamic World” and the “Arab world” do not refer to the same place, peoples, or histories, but the linkages between them are crucial. Moreover, the “state” is a relatively new ...

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New Texts Out Now: Shahla Talebi, Ghosts of Revolution: Rekindled Memories of Imprisonment in Iran

Shahla Talebi, Ghosts of Revolution: Rekindled Memories of Imprisonment in Iran. Palo Alto: Stanford University Press, 2011. Winner of the 2011 Outstanding Academic Title Award, sponsored by Choice, and Honorable Mention in the Biography & Autobiography category in the 2011 PROSE Awards Jadaliyya (J): What made you write this book?  Shahla Talebi (ST): I knew since leaving Iran in late 1993 that I wanted to find a way to make whatever sense possible of my experience of imprisonment, and the way the revolution had swallowed its children. I studied anthropology as a way of ...

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...and Counting

Sabah Mustapha Ahmad / Ahmed al-Fahel / Ahmed Subhi al-Fahal/ Ahmad Subhi al-Fahl / Waddah Saadi Saleh al-Obeidi / Brothers of dead man / Daugther of dead couple / Wife of Dead man / Daughter of dead couple…and Counting: Failure and Loss in Wafaa Bilal’s Body Modification Work. In Wafaa Bilal’s recent performance, …and Counting, the artist utilizes tattoo art to document the deaths of thousands of Americans and Iraqis killed since March 2003, which marked the start of the US-led invasion in Iraq. Over a twenty-four-hour period, tattoo artists methodically rendered the names of ...

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New Texts Out Now: Stephen Day, Regionalism and Rebellion in Yemen

Stephen W. Day, Regionalism and Rebellion in Yemen: A Troubled National Union. Cambridge and New York: Cambridge University Press, 2012. Jadaliyya: What made you write this book? Stephen Day (SD): This book had a long gestation period, so answering this question is a bit complicated. I would say the book has been more than ten years in the making. It originates with my doctoral thesis at Georgetown University. I started field research in Yemen in 1995, five years after the country’s national unification and two years after its first multi-party elections, which resulted in political ...

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New Texts Out Now: Nergis Ertürk, Grammatology and Literary Modernity in Turkey

Nergis Ertürk, Grammatology and Literary Modernity in Turkey. New York and Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2011. Jadaliyya (J): What made you write this book? Nergis Ertürk (NE): One of my motives was to try to deepen our understanding of the phoneticizing Turkish alphabet reform of 1928, which replaced a Perso-Arabic script with a Latin alphabet, as well the language reforms of the 1930s, which replaced many Arabic and Persian loanwords with Turkish neologisms. Of the effects of these reforms, the Romance philologist Erich Auerbach observed in a letter to Walter Benjamin dated 3 January ...

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New Texts Out Now: Mervat Hatem, Literature, Gender, and Nation-Building in Nineteenth-Century Egypt

Mervat F. Hatem, Literature, Gender, and Nation-Building in Nineteenth-Century Egypt: The Life and Works of `A’sha Taymur. New York: Palgrave Macmillan, 2011. Jadaliyya (J): What made you write this book? Mervat Hatem (MH): The modern construction of Egyptian history gives the grand old men of nineteenth-century Egyptian modernity (Khedive Ismail, Sheikh Rifa` Rafi` al-Tahtawi, and judge Qasim Amin) credit for promoting the interests of women by respectively building the first general school for women in al-Siyufiya (1873) and publishing one important book that supported the education of ...

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The Rhythms of Egypt's Revolutionaries

Music has been one of the most invigorating and beautiful forms of activism across the Middle East and North Africa during the revolutions and uprisings of 2011. People have rallied around the musicians and their messages, from rappers like Morocco's El Haked or Tunisia's El Général to singers like Syria's Ibrahim Qashoush and Egypt's Ramy Essam. The music is a lasting and emotionally rich record of the demands and sentiments of protesters and revolutionaries. It expresses the decades of suffering, corruption, and oppression under autocratic rule. France24's multimedia documentary, The Songs ...

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New Texts Out Now: Nezar AlSayyad, Cairo: Histories of a City

Nezar AlSayyad, Cairo: Histories of a City. Cambridge: Harvard University Press, 2011. Jadaliyya (J): Why did you write this book? Nezar AlSayyad (NA): Cairo has fascinated me since I was first exposed to the city’s Islamic heritage in 1973, and it has continued to keep me under its spell. This love affair began to wane by the early 1990s, however, when my appreciation for the city began to be tempered by the realities of its problems. By the time I was asked to write this book, in 2006, I had published two other books on various aspects of Cairo and had spent many years devoted to ...

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A New Kind of Armenian-Turkish Reconciliation

In October 2011, the newly renovated Sourp Giragos Armenian Apostolic Church reopened in Turkey’s southeastern province of Diyarbakir. Among the hundreds gathered to celebrate its first mass in over ninety years were local men and women who had chosen the occasion to be baptized into the Armenian Apostolic Church. Raised as Sunni Muslims, these men and women were the children and grandchildren of Armenians who had converted to Islam to escape persecution in the waning days of the Ottoman Empire. Living in a society that glorified cultural homogeneity and in a country that still bore the ...

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New Texts Out Now: Betty S. Anderson, The American University of Beirut: Arab Nationalism and Liberal Education

Betty S. Anderson, The American University of Beirut: Arab Nationalism and Liberal Education. Austin: University of Texas Press, 2011. Jadaliyya (J): What made you write this book? Betty S. Anderson (BSA): I always joke that I conceived the project in the pool of the Carlton Hotel in Beirut. In June 2000, I visited Beirut for the first time so I could attend an Arab American University Graduate (AAUG) conference. One day, I walked with some friends all along the Corniche and up through the American University of Beirut (AUB) campus and then back to the hotel. Since it was late June ...

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Struggles That Fueled a Revolution

Bulaq: Among the Ruins of an Unfinished Revolution. Directed by Davide Morandini and Fabio Lucchini. UK/Italy/Egypt, 2011. “Bread, freedom, and social justice” has been one of the most memorable chants from Egypt’s year of mass protests. Although world and Egyptian media have been fixated on the symbolic Tahrir Square, little attention has been directed towards places where many Egyptians converging on the square actually live. Bulaq, only a few hundred meters north of Tahrir Square, is one such neighborhood. The residents of Bulaq represent the essence of why Egyptians erupted in mass ...

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New Texts Out Now: Lila Abu-Lughod and Anupama Rao, Women's Rights, Muslim Family Law, and the Politics of Consent

Lila Abu-Lughod and Anupama Rao, editors, Women’s Rights, Muslim Family Law, and the Politics of Consent. Special issue of SOCIALDIFFERENCE-ONLINE (December 2011). [SOCIALDIFFERENCE-ONLINE is a publication of the Center for the Critical Analysis of Social Difference at Columbia University, an advanced study center that promotes innovative interdisciplinary scholarship on the role of gender, sexuality, ethnicity, and race in global dynamics of power and inequality.] Jadaliyya (J): What made you organize the workshop that led to this special issue? Lila Abu-Lughod and Anupama Rao (LA-L and ...

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New Texts Out Now: Pascale Ghazaleh, Held in Trust: Waqf in the Islamic World

Pascale Ghazaleh, editor, Held in Trust: Waqf in the Islamic World. Cairo and New York: American University of Cairo Press, 2011. Jadaliyya (J): What made you put together this book? Pascale Ghazaleh (PG): This book brings together articles written by scholars from different countries, working on different aspects of waqf during different periods. These articles were originally papers submitted to the annual seminar organized by Dr. Nelly Hanna of the American University in Cairo's Arab and Islamic Civilizations Department. In 2005, I helped set up the seminar, and the theme we ...

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Syria Media Roundup (February 16)

Recent articles and analysis on Syria, representing diverse positions: Virtual and on-the-ground changes to Syria’s streets and squares Chatham House on Syria (1) Chatham House on Syria (2) Some tribal history for Syria Syria, Spin and Propaganda on Al-Jazeera’s The Listening Post The real Syrian opposition...? on Syria Comment Nir Rosen on ‘The Battle for Homs’ BBC : US Government positions on Syria, Aleppo bombings BBC’s on-the-ground reporting from Homs Debate and comment on options for Syria Palestinian int

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A Changing American Context? Reflections on Two Books on Egyptian History from Cairo

Nelly Hanna, Artisan Entrepreneurs in Cairo and Early Modern Capitalism (1600–1800). Syracuse: Syracuse University Press, 2011. Raouf `Abbas Hamid and `Asim el-Dessouky, The Large Landowning Class and the Peasantry in Egypt, 1837-1952. Translated from the Arabic by Amer Mohsen with Mona Zikri. Edited by Peter Gran. Syracuse: Syracuse University Press, 2011. The publication of Nelly Hanna’s Artisan Entrepreneurs in Cairo and Early Modern Capitalism (1600–1800) and Raouf `Abbas Hamid’s and `Asim el-Dessouky’s The Large Landowning Class and the Peasantry in Egypt, 1837-1952 marks something ...

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New Texts Out Now: Joshua Stacher, Adaptable Autocrats: Regime Power in Egypt and Syria

Joshua Stacher, Adaptable Autocrats: Regime Power in Egypt and Syria. Palo Alto: Stanford University Press, 2012.  Jadaliyya: What made you write this book? Joshua Stacher: The central reason for writing this book was to understand the differences in how executive power operates in autocratic political systems. I had been living in Cairo for about four years and, while I had traveled to other Arab countries and noticed differences, I had grown accustomed to the Mubarak regime's variant of autocracy. After living and researching in Damascus for about three weeks, I started to ...

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Remapping Palestine and the Politics of Injury

Till Roeskens, Videomappings: Aida, Palestine. Palestine/France, 2009. The struggle over Palestine Normal 0 false false false EN-US X-NONE X-NONE Keep Reading »

New Texts Out Now: Ben White, Palestinians in Israel: Segregation, Discrimination, and Democracy

Ben White, Palestinians in Israel: Segregation, Discrimination and Democracy. London: Pluto Press and New York: Palgrave Macmillan, 2011. Jadaliyya (J): What made you write this book? Ben White (BW): I wanted to write something that would accessibly describe the policies of segregation and discrimination that Palestinian citizens in Israel have experienced since 1948. Many people—even those who are engaged with Palestine/Israel to some extent—are unaware of the ways in which the Palestinian minority has been systematically marginalized in ways that go far beyond the “complaints of ...

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New Texts Out Now: Magid Shihade, Not Just a Soccer Game: Colonialism and Conflict Among Palestinians in Israel

Magid Shihade, Not Just a Soccer Game: Colonialism and Conflict Among Palestinians in Israel. Syracuse: Syracuse University Press, 2011. Jadaliyya (J): What made you write this book? Magid Shihade (MS): One reason was personal. The book begins with a case study of a soccer game between two Palestinian villages: Kafr Yassif, with a dominantly Christian population, and Julis, which is a Druze village. The game ended with a fight between the fans of the two teams and resulted in the killing of two people, one from each village. This took place while the Israeli police, who were present at the ...

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Imagine Africa

Imagine Africa. Published by the Pirogue Collective. Brooklyn, NY and Dakar, Senegal: Island Position, 2011. If you do a Google search for the phrase “Imagine Africa,” the results are not encouraging. Among the most popular results, you will find a company operating under that name offering “luxury safaris and beach holidays” in Africa. You will also encounter a project originating out of the University of Michigan under the name “IMAGINE Africa,” which in this case stands for “IMplementing A Global Internet Network in Africa,” a project intended “to bring Internet access to the rural ...

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Knowledge and Power in Algeria: An Interview with Daho Djerbal on the Twentieth Anniversary of NAQD

It is still very possible to work on Algeria without ever passing through the Contrôle Passeport in Algiers. For a host of reasons—archival, bureaucratic, historical and, perhaps, psychological—Algeria remains on the margins of its own historiography. Arriving in September, I expected to get many questions from scholars who have worked here in the past, pertaining to the current conditions of research, the upcoming legislative elections, and the finally-completed metro (thirty years in the making). Instead, the one question I was most consistently asked by friends and colleagues was: Do you ...

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Theses on the "Arab Spring"

The gigantic upheaval that is shaking the entire Arab world since its initial tremors started in Tunisia on 17 December 2010 was determined by a long and deep accumulation of explosive factors: the lack of economic growth, massive unemployment (the highest average rate of all world regions), widespread endemic corruption, huge social inequalities, despotic governments void of democratic legitimacy, citizens treated as servile subjects, etc. The mass of people who entered into action across the Arab region is a composite, encompassing a wide range of social layers and categories that are ...

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New Texts Out Now: Karima Khalil, Messages from Tahrir

Karima Khalil, editor, Messages from Tahrir. Cairo and New York: American University in Cairo Press, 2011. Jadaliyya: What made you put this book together? Karima Khalil: One of the first things I saw when I went to Tahrir for the first time on 29 January 2011 was a man standing quietly, holding a sign in Arabic saying: “I used to be afraid but I became Egyptian.” I thought this was an incredibly powerful statement, coming as we did from thirty years of repression with very little public anti-regime protest. I looked around me and saw how many different people—of all ages and ...

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New Texts Out Now: Ziad Fahmy, Ordinary Egyptians: Creating the Modern Nation through Popular Culture

Ziad Fahmy, Ordinary Egyptians: Creating the Modern Nation through Popular Culture. Palo Alto: Stanford University Press, 2011.  Jadaliyya: What made you write this book? Ziad Fahmy: Growing up in Alexandria, Egypt, I experienced firsthand the marked difference between the modern standard Arabic (MSA) that I was taught in school and the colloquial Egyptian I spoke with my parents, relatives, and friends. In elementary school, I struggled with the complex grammar rules and regulations we had to learn, which had little relevance to the everyday language we spoke. Though I was obviously ...

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Happy NEWTON Year: New Texts by Ella Shohat and Joseph Sassoon, the Egyptian Revolution, and More

New Texts Out Now (NEWTON) is gearing up for 2012, featuring an array of new and forthcoming texts that are sure to be of interest to Jadaliyya readers. This week, we are delighted to feature two important books: Joseph Sassoon’s Saddam Hussein’s Ba‘th Party: Inside an Authoritarian Regime, which was just published by Cambridge University Press, and the new edition of Ella Shohat’s Israeli Cinema: East/West and the Politics of Representation, with a new postscript by the author, recently published by I. B. Tauris. Next week, to mark the first anniversary of the 25 January Revolution, we will ...

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New Texts Out Now: Ella Shohat, Israeli Cinema: East/West and the Politics of Representation

Ella Shohat, Israeli Cinema: East/West and the Politics of Representation (1989). New Edition. New York and London: I. B. Tauris, 2010 [When Ella Shohat’s book Israeli Cinema: East/West and the Politics of Representation was first published in 1989, Edward Said wrote: “Shohat's Israeli Cinema is a tour-de-force. Not only is it theoretically sophisticated, it is also deeply rooted in the changing politics and perceptions of the Israeli predicament as they bear upon Israeli films. With brilliant humanistic insight, Shohat describes the underlying ideological myths and allegorical structures ...

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New Texts Out Now: Joseph Sassoon, Saddam Hussein's Ba'th Party: Inside an Authoritarian Regime

Joseph Sassoon, Saddam Hussein’s Ba‘th Party: Inside an Authoritarian Regime. Cambridge and New York: Cambridge University Press, 2012. Jadaliyya: What made you write this book? Joseph Sassoon: The Ba‘th Party documents provide a treasure trove that allows us to understand how authoritarian regimes function and how the Iraqi system was sustained for thirty-five years in spite of wars and sanctions. I was intrigued by the ability to delve into those primary sources to find out how the different organs of the regime operated. For example, among the collection, there are almost two thousand ...

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The Foibles of Thomas Friedman

Belén Fernández, The Imperial Messenger: Thomas Friedman at Work. London and New York: Verso, 2011. A researcher once carried out an informal study to try to find out whether or not people actually read the books on bestseller lists. To find out, he put envelopes in the reputedly high-selling books. In each envelope was a note saying that if those who found the envelopes were to send them to a designated address, the researcher would send them five dollars. According to the story, the response rate was zero. After reading The Imperial Messenger, Belén Fernández’s treatment of ...

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The Nature of Oil: Reconsidering American Power in the Middle East

Timothy Mitchell, Carbon Democracy: Political Power in the Age of Oil. New York: Verso, 2011. Toby Craig Jones, Desert Kingdom: How Oil and Water Forged Modern Saudi Arabia. Cambridge: Harvard University Press, 2010. Robert Vitalis, American Kingdom: Mythmaking on the Saudi Oil Frontier. Palo Alto: Stanford University Press, 2006. For most of those who consider themselves politically liberal, oil—along with environmental degradation and foreign occupation—form a kind of political axis of evil on the American political landscape. Despite the talk of democracy promotion in Iraq and a ...

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New Texts Out Now: Hakan Ozoglu, From Caliphate to Secular State

Hakan Özoğlu, From Caliphate to Secular State: Power Struggle in the Early Turkish Republic. Santa Barbara: Praeger, 2011. Jadaliyya: What made you write this book? Hakan Özoğlu: Critical works on the early years of the Turkish Republic are quite rare, especially in Western scholarship. In the field of history, scholarly works on the Ottoman Empire overshadow the republican period. In Turkey, the transition period from the Ottoman Empire to the Republic of Turkey has long been considered “sacred” for intellectual inquiry, and the majority of books rarely step away from the line of the ...

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Tunisian Film Festival in Hollywood, 10-12 January 2012

Today is the opening of the first Tunisian Film Festival in Hollywood. It is first and foremost a commemoration of the Tunisian revolution, which surprised and shook the world, ushering in insurrections and revolts whose reverberations were heard from Cairo to New York. Secondly, it is also an opportunity to bring together Tunisians in the United States and Tunisia around a common project of exchange and dialogue with American audiences in the mecca of the film industry, Hollywood. The festival opens on 10 January with a performance by the San Francisco-based Tunisian artist, MC Rai, best ...

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New Texts Out Now: Nile Green, Bombay Islam: The Religious Economy of the West Indian Ocean, 1840-1915

Nile Green, Bombay Islam: The Religious Economy of the West Indian Ocean, 1840-1915. Cambridge and New York: Cambridge University Press, 2011. [Co-winner of the 2011 Albert Hourani Book Award] Jadaliyya: What made you write this book? Nile Green: It took me some time to realize the importance of Bombay to Muslims from all around the Indian Ocean, but after so many textual trails led me there, I realized I had to write a book about Bombay and its steam-spun web of connections. The documentation was abundant—in Muslim travelogues, vernacular poetry, printed hagiographies—though ironically I ...

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My Lonely and Beautiful Country: Recent Work on the Cinema of Turkey (Part Two)

Gönül Dönmez-Colin, Turkish Cinema: Identity, Distance, and Belonging. London: Reaktion Books and Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 2008. Asuman Suner, New Turkish Cinema: Belonging, Identity, and Memory. London and New York: I. B. Tauris, 2010. Deniz Bayrakdar, Aslı Kotaman, and Ahu Samav Uğursoy, editors, Cinema and Politics: Turkish Cinema and the New Europe. Newcastle upon Tyne: Cambridge Scholars Publishing, 2009. [Part One of this review essay, which considers Gönül Dönmez-Colin's Turkish Cinema: Identity, Distance, and Belonging, can be found here.]  Asuman Suner’s New ...

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New Texts Out Now: Rhoda Ann Kanaaneh and Isis Nusair, Displaced at Home

Rhoda Ann Kanaaneh and Isis Nusair, editors, Displaced at Home: Ethnicity and Gender among Palestinians in Israel. Albany: State University of New York Press, 2010. Jadaliyya: What made you write this book? Rhoda Ann Kanaaneh and Isis Nusair: The idea for the collection began at an informal gathering of five friends, all doctoral students or recent graduates and all Palestinians from “inside.” We had gathered for lunch during the 2005 Middle East Studies Association meeting to catch up on each other’s news. Our conversations about our research over that lunch were so interesting it ...

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My Lonely and Beautiful Country: Recent Work on the Cinema of Turkey (Part One)

Gönül Dönmez-Colin, Turkish Cinema: Identity, Distance, and Belonging. London: Reaktion Books and Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 2008. Asuman Suner, New Turkish Cinema: Belonging, Identity, and Memory. London and New York: I. B. Tauris, 2010. Deniz Bayrakdar, Aslı Kotaman, and Ahu Samav Uğursoy, editors, Cinema and Politics: Turkish Cinema and the New Europe. Newcastle upon Tyne: Cambridge Scholars Publishing, 2009. Upon being awarded the Best Director honor at Cannes in 2008 for his film Üç Maymun [Three Monkeys]—becoming the first Turkish director to receive this award—Nuri Bilge ...

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New Texts Out Now: Marcy Jane Knopf-Newman, The Politics of Teaching Palestine to Americans

Marcy Jane Knopf-Newman, The Politics of Teaching Palestine to Americans: Addressing Pedagogical Strategies. New York: Palgrave-Macmillan, 2011. Jadaliyya: What made you write this book? Marcy Jane Knopf-Newman: The book started off as something quite different than what I intended. I began my research in the summer of 2005 with the intention of examining how Palestinian and Israeli youth produce cultural and political change together as "equal" partners for "peace." Obviously, at the time I held a typically liberal, soft Zionist, and rather naive understanding of the ...

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New Texts Out Now: Nadje Al-Ali and Nicola Pratt, Between Nationalism and Women's Rights

Nadje Al-Ali and Nicola Pratt, "Between Nationalism and Women's Rights: The Kurdish Women's Movement in Iraq," Middle East Journal of Culture and Communication 4.3 (2011): 337-353. Jadaliyya: What made you write this article? Nadje Al-Ali and Nicola Pratt: This article is part of a special issue of the Middle East Journal of Culture and Communication on contemporary Iraq, which seeks to go beyond the mainstream focus on security issues, elite politics, and oil to understand the political, cultural, and intellectual trends within Iraqi society. The aims of our contribution are to ...

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NEWTON Authors Rochelle Davis and Alan Mikhail Receive 2011 MESA Book Awards

We are very happy to report that two authors whose books were recently featured in New Texts Out Now (NEWTON) were recipients of prestigious awards at the 2011 Middle East Studies Association convention. Rochelle Davis, whose book Palestinian Village Histories: Geographies of the Displaced was featured in NEWTON last week, was one of two winners awarded the 2011 Albert Hourani Book Award. Alan Mikhail, whose book Nature and Empire in Ottoman Egypt: An Environmental History was featured in NEWTON in October, was awarded the 2011 Roger Owen Book Award. In addition, we are delighted that the ...

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Bombing the Neighborhood: Daniel Ellsberg and the Radical Critique of American Empire

The Most Dangerous Man in America: Daniel Ellsberg and the Pentagon Papers. Directed by Judith Ehrlich and Rick Goldsmith. United States, 2010. “It wasn’t that we were on the wrong side. We were the wrong side.” – Daniel Ellsberg Two of the most chilling scenes in Judith Ehrlich and Rick Goldsmith’s extraordinary 2010 film, The Most Dangerous Man in America: Daniel Ellsberg and the Pentagon Papers, involve Richard Nixon. Nixon had just won the 1968 presidential election, a victory that he owed in part to his promise to end the war in Vietnam and deliver to the United States an honorable ...

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New Texts Out Now: Rochelle Davis, Palestinian Village Histories: Geographies of the Displaced

Rochelle Davis, Palestinian Village Histories: Geographies of the Displaced. Palo Alto: Stanford University Press, 2011. [Co-winner of the 2011 Albert Hourani Book Award] Jadaliyya: What made you write this book? Rochelle Davis: Over the course of a decade, I collected 120 village books written by Palestinians about the more than four hundred villages that were destroyed in the 1948 war. By documenting and analyzing the work of these local historians and preservationists, and their knowledge of a disappeared landscape and way of life, I provide readers with a sense of the past and suggest ...

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Quiet Crossings, Kinship, and Intimacy in Lebanon and Northeast Syria

George Awde, Solo Show at the Korn Gallery, Curated by Rebecca Soderholm, September 7 – October 14 George Awde’s first US solo exhibition offered an arresting and intimate look at the production of masculinity and kinship at the interstices between Syria and Lebanon. Awde, an American-born artist of Lebanese descent, is a photographer and educator who works in the US and Beirut. He received his BFA in painting from Massachusetts College of Art in 2004, and in 2009 he received his MFA from Yale University in photography. His work has been exhibited internationally. In this exhibition, Awde ...

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New Texts Out Now: Zakia Salime, Between Feminism and Islam: Human Rights and Sharia Law in Morocco

Zakia Salime, Between Feminism and Islam: Human Rights and Sharia Law in Morocco. Minneapolis: University of Minnesota Press, 2011. Jadaliyya: What made you write this book? Zakia Salime: In this critical time of sweeping revolts and political changes in the Middle East, it is very useful to revisit the spaces of contentions that have been opened by women’s rights groups. My book shows how two decades of struggles over broadening the spheres of expression and rights have led to dramatic changes in both Moroccan feminism and Moroccan Islamism. My interest in documenting these shifts began ...

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Some Panels from the Upcoming Meeting of the Middle East Studies Association

The Middle East Studies Association (MESA) will be holding its 43rd Annual Meeting in Washington DC this weekend, 1-4 December. Over a span of four days, scholars and researchers from across North America, the Middle East, and beyond will present their work via an impressive and diverse array of thematic panels (see complete program here). In order to highlight some of the panels, below is a list of MESA 2011 Annual Meeting panels in which one or more Jadaliyya Co-Editor is involved in as an organizer, presenter, and/or discussant. However, to appreciate the full spectrum of topics, themes, ...

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Our University: On Police Violence at CUNY

This past Monday, I was one of a handful of faculty and staff among a group of CUNY students standing in the lobby of a building at Baruch College in Manhattan. We had all entered with our CUNY i.d. cards in hand. Our intention was to attend a public hearing called by the CUNY Board of Trustees to discuss proposed tuition increases. Among us, it should be noted, were students who had signed up in advance to speak at this public hearing. I was surprised—although, given recent events involving police violence at the University of California and throughout New York City, I should not have ...

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Adventures in Candyland

This week, walking through Columbia University's campus, I noticed a piece of paper stuck to the metal railings around me. It was a flyer advertising Israel week at Columbia University, a popular yearly event meant to discuss issues related to Israel and foster support on campus for that state. This year, one of the events in particular caught my eye. The event was titled Mapping Israel's Borders, and the blurb read: “Do you want to learn more about the history of Israel and the Arab-Israeli conflict? Do you love CANDY? Map out the history of Israel's map . . . with candy! Watch how the ...

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New Texts Out Now: Ayca Cubukcu, On Cosmopolitan Occupations: The Case of the World Tribunal on Iraq

Ayça Çubukçu, “On Cosmopolitan Occupations: The Case of the World Tribunal on Iraq,” Interventions: International Journal of Postcolonial Studies 13.3 (2011): 422-442. Jadaliyya: What made you write this article? Ayça Çubukçu: The origin of this article goes back to my fieldwork with the global network of activists that constituted the World Tribunal on Iraq from 2003 to 2005. The World Tribunal on Iraq was an experimental project of the global anti-war movement, which emerged in response to the occupation of Iraq by the United States and allies. I say “experimental,” because although civil ...

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After the Spring: Thoughts on Cultural Production and the Selling Power of Change

“After the Spring: New Short Plays from the Arab World.” Performed at the Royal Court Theatre, London, August 2011. As part of their international “Rough Cuts” project, the Royal Court Theatre specially commissioned a series of four short plays from the Arab world in a program entitled “After the Spring,” in response to the uprisings across the Middle East and North Africa. All four writers had previously participated in the Royal Court project when it was first established in 2007 and their first plays for “Rough Cuts,” which were staged as rehearsed readings at the Royal Court in 2008, ...

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New Texts Out Now: Wendy Pearlman, Violence, Nonviolence, and the Palestinian National Movement

Wendy Pearlman, Violence, Nonviolence, and the Palestinian National Movement. Cambridge and New York: Cambridge University Press, 2011. Jadaliyya: What made you write this book? Wendy Pearlman: I became captivated by Palestinian history and politics when I studied at Birzeit University in the West Bank from January to June 2000. Thereafter, I returned to Palestine nearly every chance I got. Three months into the second Intifada, I conducted interviews with about two dozen Palestinians in the West Bank and Gaza Strip. These were published in 2003 as the book Occupied Voices: Stories of ...

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Films for the Classroom: Silences of the Palace

Silences of the Palace [Samt al-Qusur], directed by Moufida Tlatli. France/Tunisia, 1994. As a lover of film, I am often asked about my favorites. And as a lover of Arab film in particular, I am usually expected by friends and colleagues to begin with a paean to the Egyptian cinema. Growing up in the home of an Egyptian immigrant to Canada, I was weaned on a steady diet of Fatin Hamama, Rushdy Abaza, and Samia Gamal, and perhaps unsurprisingly, the cinema of the 1950s and the 1960s became a passion. I could never get fired up about the fluff of the forties, and the schlock of the ...

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New Texts Out Now: Wilson Chacko Jacob, Working Out Egypt

Wilson Chacko Jacob, Working Out Egypt: Effendi Masculinity and Subject Formation in Colonial Modernity, 1870–1940. Durham: Duke University Press, 2011. Jadaliyya: What made you write this book? Wilson Chacko Jacob: Working Out Egypt has a number of possible origins, some related to decisions I have made and others that seem entirely divorced from me. In the first place, it was a revision of my doctoral dissertation written under Zachary Lockman’s supervision at New York University. Having had a prior incarnation cannot but leave its mark. In this case, that previous life as a PhD thesis ...

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Where the Truth Lies

Once Upon a Time in Anatolia. Directed by Nuri Bilge Ceylan. Turkey, 2011. Nuri Bilge Ceylan’s Once Upon a Time in Anatolia opens with a scene in which the truth is buried; it is there in front of us but hidden. The first thing we see is an image that is shot from outside a dirty window. The camera remains outside, but the faces behind the window slowly become visible: three men are having drinks inside a car-mechanic's workshop. We are left outside, the sound is distant, and the image is blurry. A truck passes by and wipes the image out. This was it; that is when it happened. Shortly after ...

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Announcing the Arab Council for the Social Sciences

A new arrival on the Arab research landscape is the Arab Council for the Social Sciences (ACSS), which was recently legally established (in March 2011) as a regional, independent, non-profit organization headquartered in Beirut, Lebanon. The Council is dedicated to strengthening social science research and research capacity in the Arab world. It aims to promote a strong and vibrant social science community by facilitating and supporting networking and the collaborative production of knowledge between individuals and institutions within the region and beyond. Its structure includes a General ...

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New Texts Out Now: Belen Fernandez, The Imperial Messenger: Thomas Friedman at Work

Belén Fernández, The Imperial Messenger: Thomas Friedman at Work. London and New York: Verso, 2011. Jadaliyya: Why did you write this book? Belén Fernández: I asked myself this question several thousand times, particularly during my third rereading of every Friedman column published since 1995. The idea for the book came about in a far less climactic fashion than Friedman’s ideas tend to occur—i.e. it did not involve “Quarter-Pounder[ing] my way around the world,” being struck by a “bolt out of the blue that must have hit somewhere between the McDonald’s in Tiananmen ...

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PARC 2012-13 Fellowship Competition for U.S. Scholars: Conducting Field-Based Research on Palestine

PARC Palestinian American Research Center PARC 2012-13 Fellowship Competition for U.S. Scholars: Conducting Field-Based Research on Palestine Fellowship awards from $6,000 to $10,000 Full proposals due January 12, 2012 Awards announced March 12, 2012 The Palestinian American Research Center (PARC) announces its 13th annual competition for post-doctoral and doctoral research fellowships in Palestinian studies. Important information about the fellowship competition: Research must contribute to Palestinian studies. Any area of Palestinian studies will be considered, ...

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Romance, not Romanticized: Three Stories of Love and Loss from the Boston Palestine Film Festival

Love During Wartime, directed by Gabriella Bier. Sweden, 2010. Paradise Lost, directed by Ibtissam Mara’anah. Israel-Palestine, 2003. 77 Steps, directed by Ibtissam Mara’anah. Israel-Palestine, 2010. All three films are playing at the Boston Palestine Film Festival this week. In their films, Ibtissam Mara’anah and Gabriella Bier both focus on romantic relationships that cross the Palestinian-Israeli divide. Bier’s Love During Wartime follows a married couple grappling with bureaucrats and policies that deny them permission to live together, while Mara’anah’s autobiographical works ...

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New Texts Out Now: Alan Mikhail, "Nature and Empire in Ottoman Egypt"

Alan Mikhail, Nature and Empire in Ottoman Egypt: An Environmental History. Cambridge and New York: Cambridge University Press, 2011. [Winner of the 2011 Roger Owen Book Award] Jadaliyya: What made you write this book? Alan Mikhail: In the most general sense, I wrote this book because I wanted to understand the period of Ottoman rule in the Arab World. The Ottomans were in Egypt for over 350 years, so they clearly must have had a fundamental role in shaping its history, politics, culture, and economy. I wondered why so many historians of the Middle East work on the nineteenth and twentieth ...

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The Others, the Elsewhere of Our Here

John E. Drabinski, Godard Between Identity and Difference. New York and London: Continuum, 2008. John Drabinski’s Godard Between Identity and Difference is a rare thing in the world of contemporary academic writing: a book that reveals the author’s personal, idiosyncratic, and loving relationship with his subject. The reader comes away from this book not merely impressed by its arguments and enlightened by its readings, but also moved by its passion. One feels that one has just had an extended discussion with a smart and funny friend at a bar or a diner after coming out of an all-day Godard ...

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The Irvine 11, the Police, and the Autonomy of the University

The recent conviction of ten University of California students of two misdemeanor counts of disrupting and conspiring to disrupt a speech given by Israeli Ambassador Michael Oren on 8 February 2010, points to the stifling of free speech and academic work and inquiry in the university. Three of the Irvine 11 are students at the University of California, Riverside, and two of these UCR students have been my own: Taher Herzallah and Shaheen Nassar. Both were studious, inquisitive, and engaged, modeling for others, in their behavior, what being a university student ought to be about. I will even ...

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New Texts Out Now: Linda Herrera and Asef Bayat, "Being Young and Muslim"

Linda Herrera and Asef Bayat, editors, Being Young and Muslim: New Cultural Politics in the Global South and North. Oxford and New York: Oxford University Press, 2010. Jadaliyya: What made you write this book? Linda Herrera and Asef Bayat: Both of us (editors) were involved in studying youth in Muslim majority contexts for a number of years and from different angles. Linda had been working on issues of youth in relation to the cultures and politics of schooling for almost two decades. While at the International Institute of Social Studies in The Hague (2005-2010), she convened the Children ...

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The Shibboleths within Albert Memmi's Universalism

Albert Memmi, Decolonization and the Decolonized. Minneapolis & London: University of Minnesota Press, 2006.  “What? Post-colonialism? Have they left?” - Aborigine activist Bobbi Sykes’ comment at an academic conference on post-colonialism[1] Is there a place for “Muslim” or “Arab” peoples in “Western” “universal” values of equality, freedom, democracy, rights, and so forth? Both categories frequently subsume religious and/or ethnicized (mis)conceptualizations in current Western discourse. Every day in the news, there is at least one item that reveals (again) the hypocritical ...

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Film and its Voices: The DC Palestinian Film and Arts Festival

Palestinian Film and Arts Festival September 26 - 30, 2011, Washington, DC Last week Washington, DC joined Chicago, Boston, Houston, Ann Arbor, and a string of other cities and communities in putting on the first DC Palestinian Film & Arts Festival. Over the past ten years, Palestinian Film Festivals produced by the Palestinian diaspora community have been popping up all over and have come to exhibit a new stage in Palestinian artistic expression and the showcasing of it. In the Middle East, the film industry powerhouse has always been Egypt, and while that is still very much the case, ...

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New Texts Out Now: Max Weiss, "In the Shadow of Sectarianism"

Max Weiss, In the Shadow of Sectarianism: Law, Shi`ism, and the Making of Modern Lebanon. Cambridge: Harvard University Press, 2010. Jadaliyya: What made you write this book?  Max Weiss: I suppose the central question at the heart of my book is: How did the Lebanese Shi`a become sectarian? Amidst the flood of writing about the rise to prominence and influence of the Shi'i community in Lebanon during the second half of the twentieth century—with starring roles for Imam Musa al-Sadr and his Movement of the Deprived, and subsequently-emerging figures associated with Hizballah—there ...

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Threat: Palestinian Prisoners in Israel

Abeer Baker and Anat Matar (eds.), Threat: Palestinian Political Prisoners in Israel. London: Pluto Press, 2011. There are many harrowing passages in the excellent new edited volume by Abeer Baker and Anat Matar on the processes of administrative detention and imprisonment of Palestinians in Israel; some of them are even in the book’s academic chapters. But the most harrowing, and paradoxically the most hopeful, is the account Osama Barham gives of his endless arrests, detentions, and interrogations. These began in 1979—when he was detained for flying the colors of Palestine in a flag ...

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Report on Jadaliyya's Conference on Teaching the Middle East after the Tunisian and Egyptian Revolutions

Introduction “Teaching the Middle East after the Tunisian and Egyptian Revolutions…Beyond Orientalism, Islamophobia, and Neoliberalism,” a conference sponsored by the Middle East Studies Program and the Ali Vural Ak Center for Global Islamic Studies at George Mason University, and by the Arab Studies Institute (which includes Arab Studies Journal and Jadaliyya), brought together forty participants for an intense conversation on 13-14-May 2011 at George Mason University regarding the future of pedagogy and scholarship dealing with the region (see List of ...

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New Texts Out Now: Mohamed Daadaoui, "Moroccan Monarchy and the Islamist Challenge"

Mohamed Daadaoui, Moroccan Monarchy and the Islamist Challenge: Maintaining Makhzen Power. New York: Palgrave Macmillan, 2011. Jadaliyya: What made you write this book? Mohamed Daadaoui: I wrote the book because of a long-standing interest in my own country’s political system and the remarkable longevity of monarchical rule in Morocco. Looking at the literature in general, the book attempts to fill the literature gap in Maghreb studies in the English language, and sheds light on the idiosyncrasies of the Moroccan special case of regime sustainability. For a sizeable number of Moroccans, ...

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Curriculum: Tools for Reclaiming Communities from Militarism

To mark the now decade-long US-led “Global War on Terror,” The War Resisters League and the South Asia Solidarity Initiative have created an interactive, popular eduction-style workshop that explores how organizing against federal military spending relates to and can forward local campaigns for economic justice, as well as how the past decade of war has effected Afghans and what they are doing in response. Brought to You by Bombs and Budgets: Tools for Reclaiming Communities from Militarism, tries to get to the how of "bringing the war dollars home", as more and more people ...

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"Zahra's Paradise" [Part Two]

[The writer Amir and the artist Khalil (both have chosen anonymity for political reasons) began publishing the webcomic Zahra’s Paradise online in February 2010. First Second Books has just published Zahra’s Paradise as a graphic novel. Last week, Jadaliyya interviewed Amir and Khalil on the occasion of the book’s publication. This week, we present a second excerpt from Zahra's Paradise.]  

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New Texts Out Now: Paul Sedra, "From Mission to Modernity"

Paul Sedra, From Mission to Modernity: Evangelicals, Reformers and Education in Nineteenth Century Egypt. New York: I. B. Tauris, 2011. Jadaliyya: What made you write this book? Paul Sedra: As an undergraduate, I had a strong interest in contemporary relations between Coptic Christians and Muslims in Egypt, and decided to write a senior thesis on the topic. The only problem was that the literature, particularly that in English, was terribly underdeveloped. Generally speaking, there was almost no literature in English on the modern history of the Coptic community. Much was made in the ...

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Reimagining Foreclosure as a World-Making Project

Foreclosed: Between Crisis and Possibility. Curated by Jennifer Burris, Sofía Olascoaga, Sadia Shirazi, and Gaia Tedone, Helena Rubinstein Curatorial Fellows of the Whitney Independent Study Program, 2010-2011. May 20 - June 11, 2011 The Kitchen, 512 West 19th Street, New York, NY One sticky summer afternoon, I walked into The Kitchen and encountered a distinctly alienating experience. A red rotary phone—sans rotary dial—rested on a reception desk and was set against a static backdrop of repetitious black numbers that evoked stock exchange tickers. I placed the phone’s receiver against my ...

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On Racial Literacy: "A White Side of Black Britain"

France Winddance Twine, A White Side of Black Britain: Interracial Intimacy and Racial Literacy. Durham: Duke University Press, 2011. Despite the central role they play in our lives, the intimate spaces of family life have unfortunately remained beyond the reach of most sociological research. This empirical blind spot has led to a surprising lack of knowledge around how people, in their private spaces shared with loved ones, think and act about social issues. There are some perfectly understandable reasons why this enormous gap in sociological knowledge exists, even given the unquestionable ...

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New Texts Out Now: Adam Hanieh, "Capitalism and Class in the Gulf Arab States"

Adam Hanieh, Capitalism and Class in the Gulf Arab States. New York: Palgrave Macmillan, 2011. Jadaliyya: What made you write this book? Adam Hanieh: Although this book is very much focused on the political economy of the Gulf Cooperation Council (Saudi Arabia, United Arab Emirates, Kuwait, Bahrain, Qatar, and Oman), it has its origins in the six years (1997-2003) that I lived in the West Bank, Palestine. During that time, I had the opportunity to travel throughout the Middle East, and was repeatedly struck by the centrality of the Gulf to the political economy of the region as a whole. ...

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New Texts Out Now: Steven Salaita, "Israel's Dead Soul"

Steven Salaita, Israel’s Dead Soul. Philadelphia: Temple University Press, 2011. Jadaliyya: What made you write this book? Steven Salaita: I'd been wanting for a long time to systematically explore the idea of Israel's soul being in some sort of crisis. The decline of Israel's soul is a notion much ridiculed by those opposed to Zionism, and I thought it would be fun and illuminating to articulate why such ridicule exists—and why it is completely justified. J: What particular topics, issues, and literatures does it address? SS: It is a basic discourse analysis of some of the basic ...

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New Texts Out Now: Khalid Medani, "Strife and Secession in Sudan"

Khalid Medani, “Strife and Secession in Sudan,” Journal of Democracy 22.3 (July 2011): 135-149. Jadaliyya: What made you write this article? Khalid Medani: I wrote the article “Strife and Secession in Sudan” because I felt very strongly that the analysis of the politics in Sudan has long been characterized by misrepresentations and simply a lack of understanding of the roots of the conflicts in the country and the problems having to do with the secession of South Sudan in the longer term. On the one hand, policymakers have been invested in overseeing the secession of the South based on ...

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New Texts Out Now: Amal Ghazal, "Islamic Reform and Arab Nationalism"

Amal N. Ghazal, Islamic Reform and Arab Nationalism: Expanding the Crescent from the Mediterranean to the Indian Ocean (1880s-1930s). New York: Routledge, 2010. Jadaliyya: What made you write this book? Amal Ghazal: I wanted to find a topic that bridged my two fields of study, Middle East Studies and African Studies. I thought Omani rule in East Africa would be interesting, especially in that I was initially able to trace correspondence between Arabs in East Africa and newspapers in the Middle East. A research trip to Oman revealed that I was stepping into a goldmine: Omanis in Zanzibar ...

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New Texts Out Now: The Back to School Edition

Just in time for the new semester, we are happy to present a series of eminently teachable texts in the latest edition of NEWTON: James Gelvin, The Modern Middle East: A History and The Arab Uprisings: What Everyone Needs to Know Stephen Sheehi, Islamophobia: The Ideological Campaign Against Muslims Saadia Toor, The State of Islam: Culture and Cold War Politics in Pakistan We hope that the author interviews and excerpts from these texts, together with the others we have featured thus far in New Texts Out Now, will be helpful for those busy assembling syllabi and reading lists, as well as ...

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New Texts Out Now: James Gelvin, "The Modern Middle East" and "The Arab Uprisings"

James L. Gelvin, The Modern Middle East: A History, Third Edition. New York and Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2011. James L. Gelvin, The Arab Uprisings: What Everyone Needs to Know. New York and Oxford: Oxford University Press, forthcoming in 2011. Jadaliyya: What made you write The Modern Middle East: A History originally, and what led you to work on this revised and updated edition?  James Gelvin: Oxford originally suggested I do the book and I agreed immediately. It was something I had been thinking of doing anyway. Although the book is published by Oxford's textbook ...

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New Texts Out Now: Stephen Sheehi, "Islamophobia: The Ideological Campaign Against Muslims"

Stephen Sheehi, Islamophobia: The Ideological Campaign Against Muslims. Atlanta, GA: Clarity Press, 2011. Jadaliyya: What made you write this book? Stephen Sheehi: Undoubtedly, the assault on decency, sanity, and justice under the Bush regime inspired the book at the most immediate level. More compelling than the neocon-Vulcan agenda, however, was how, when one looks at it structurally (beyond the veneer of its rhetoric), one sees only how it activated the racist unconscious of the American mainstream. Growing up as an Arab-American, as a brown man in a post-Vietnam, post-Camp David ...

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New Texts Out Now: Saadia Toor, "The State of Islam: Culture and Cold War Politics in Pakistan"

Saadia Toor, The State of Islam: Culture and Cold War Politics in Pakistan. London and New York: Pluto Press, 2011. Jadaliyya: What made you write this book? Saadia Toor: I felt compelled to write this book because of the increasingly disturbing discourse on Pakistan in the West, both within the media and within academia. There is a mixture of incomprehension and hawkishness in this discourse when it comes to Pakistan, which is extremely dangerous given the increasing extension of the US/NATO war in Afghanistan into Pakistan. I believe that the ease with which even anti-war liberals (and ...

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New Texts Out Now: Nadine Naber, "Arab America: Gender, Cultural Politics, and Activism"

Nadine Naber, Arab America: Gender, Cultural Politics, and Activism. New York: New York University Press (Nation of Newcomers Series), forthcoming in 2012. Jadaliyya: What made you write this book? Nadine Naber: As part of my work in Arab American Studies for the last fifteen years, this book is, in part, an internal critique of my own field and much of my own previous scholarship. Most Arab American Studies research—important and necessary as it is—has taken one of two approaches. First and foremost, there are analyses that interrogate the historically specific and changing effect of US ...

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New Texts Out Now: Mohammad R. Salama, "Islam, Orientalism, and Intellectual History"

Mohammad R. Salama, Islam, Orientalism, and Intellectual History: Modernity and the Politics of Exclusion since Ibn Khaldun. London and New York: I. B Tauris, 2011. Jadaliyya: What made you write this book? Mohammad Salama: There were a few reasons that compelled me to write this book. First, I am a Muslim who has been living in the US since the September 11 attacks, and I have witnessed the dire consequences of those events on personal and public levels. After so much misinformation about Muslims and Islam invaded the public sphere and was unfortunately widely believed, I felt that ...

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Inhabiting the Possible: Pedagogy and Solidarity at Camp Ayandeh

“A decent education cannot be limited to tolerating youth accessing their ethnic and cultural history but must be about facilitating their right to do so.” — Cornel West Globally and nationally, young people are garnering attention as historical actors and agents of social change. At the same time, federal, state, and local politicians are making drastic cuts to primary and secondary schooling, community services supportive of youth development, and higher education. These cuts coincide with a rise in anti-immigrant sentiment and continued demonization of Muslim and Middle Eastern ...

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Jadaliyya Launches "New Texts Out Now" (NEWTON)

Jadaliyya is delighted to announce the launching of its newest section: New Texts Out Now (NEWTON); click here to access the page directly. NEWTON features interviews with writers of recently published and forthcoming books, articles, and translations, along with short excerpts from these new works. We hope it will be a resource for readers anxious to keep up with new publications in the field, as well as those looking for more information about a variety of topics and issues related to the Middle East. In our inaugural installment, we are very pleased to be featuring: Hamid Dabashi, Brown ...

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New Texts Out Now: Hamid Dabashi, "Brown Skin, White Masks"

Hamid Dabashi, Brown Skin, White Masks. New York and London: Pluto Press, 2011. JADALIYYA: What made you write this book? HAMID DABASHI: This book is very much a product of the Bush era (2000-2008) — a record of my fears and trembling at the sight of a criminally delusional man at the helm of an imperial killing machine and lacking any moral conception of what it was he was doing when he ordered the invasion of Afghanistan and Iraq, two catastrophic decisions that Afghans and Iraqis continue to pay for with their lives. I was aghast at the sight of the mass frenzy that accompanied those ...

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New Texts Out Now: Paul Amar, "Middle East Masculinity Studies"

Paul Amar, “Middle East Masculinity Studies: Discourses of ‘Men in Crisis,’ Industries of Gender in Revolution,” Journal of Middle East Women’s Studies 7.3 (Fall 2011): 36-71. Jadaliyya: What made you write this article? Paul Amar: I began drafting this article two years ago in order to seek ways out of the impasse in which the study of sexuality in the Middle East had become trapped. I was asking myself, how do we highlight aspects of coloniality, geopolitics, and power in the study of sexuality, without, on the one hand, reducing the social subjects of sexuality to the dupes, tools, or ...

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New Texts Out Now: Ahmed Kanna, "Dubai, the City as Corporation"

Ahmed Kanna, Dubai, the City as Corporation. Minneapolis: University of Minnesota Press, 2011.         Jadaliyya: What made you write this book? Ahmed Kanna: This is my first book. It emerged from my dissertation research. When I first started studying anthropology in graduate school, I thought I would do fieldwork in Lebanon and on Levantine cultures (having spent a couple of summers traveling and living in Damascus and especially Beirut). At around the same time (early 2000s), I started getting interested in the literature on the ...

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A Creature Which Would Be Impossible If It Did Not Exist: "Midnight's Children" Turns Thirty

Salman Rushdie’s Midnight’s Children, which turns thirty this year, opens with one of the most celebrated bouts of throat-clearing in literary history: I was born in the city of Bombay...once upon a time. No, that won’t do, there’s no getting away from the date: I was born in Doctor Narlikar’s Nursing Home on August 15th, 1947. And the time? The time matters, too. Well then: at night. No, it’s important to be more...On the stroke of midnight, as a matter of fact. Clock-hands joined palms in respectful greeting as I came. Oh, spell it out, spell it out: at the precise instant of India’s ...

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On the Historical Study of South Asia and Sufism: An Interview with Nile Green

In the following conversation with Jadaliyya Co-Editor Ziad Abu-Rish, University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA) Professor of History Nile Green discusses some of the issues arising from the study of “Muslims of South Asia and the wider Persianate world.” The bulk of the interview addresses issues related to the study of the history of South Asia, Sufism, and Islam. It concludes with some advice for graduate students struggling to define their research agendas. The interview was originally conducted in the spring of 2009. Ziad Abu-Rish (ZA): Your bio on the UCLA Department of History ...

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Book Reviews in the Arab Studies Journal's Forthcoming Issue

We are pleased to announce the Book Review section of the upcoming  release of the latest issue of Arab Studies Journal, Jadaliyya's sister organization under the umbrella of the Arab Studies Institute, and its peer-reviewed research publication arm. For more information about the Arab Studies Journal, please visit our About page here.  This nineteenth year of the Arab Studies Journal review section continues the Journal’s tradition of bringing select new titles of interest together with both rising and established scholars. Our reviews span a ...

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New Arab Studies Journal Issue . . . Around the Corner!

We are pleased to announce the upcoming  release of the latest issue of Arab Studies Journal, Jadaliyya's sister organization under the umbrella of the Arab Studies Institute, and its peer-reviewed research publication arm. For more information about the Arab Studies Journal, please visit our About page here. Revolutions, uprisings, demonstrations and protests have unfolded in ways both exultant and heartbreaking across North Africa and the Middle East in the last several months. As individuals, communities, citizenries, and populations tired of decades of a manipulation of ...

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Universal Jurisdiction: A Conversation between Lisa Hajjar and Richard Falk

Richard Falk and Lisa Hajjar engage in a discussion about universal jurisdiction, international law, and criminal accountability for gross crimes (torture, genocide, war crimes and crimes against humanity). The doctrine of universal jurisdiction was developed in the 19th century to combat piracy and slave trading on the high seas. The aim was to close a jurisdictional gap by allowing governments to prosecute these "enemies of all mankind" in their own national legal systems despite no direct connection to the crime. Developments in the post-World War II era, notably the Nuremberg ...

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Youth, Media and the Art of Protest in North Africa

“Everyone has his own way of fighting, and my weapon is art!” says Milad Faraway, a 20 year-old Libyan who created the rap group Music Masters with another young friend in 2010. Their song “Youth of the Revolution” urges “Moammar [to] get out” and end the violation of Libyans’ rights. “Qadhafi, open your eyes wide” sings another rap group Revolution Beat: “you will see that the Libyan people just broke through the fear barrier.” In neighboring Tunisia, twenty-one year old Hamada Ben Amor, known as El General, circulated on the internet his video song “President: Your people are dying” in an ...

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"Teaching the Middle East" Conference: Conclusions and Moving Forward

The best way to conclude this summary and discussion of “Teaching the Middle East” — indeed, given the structure of the conference and the nature of the conversations, as set out by Bassam Haddad in his opening remarks and reiterated in his remarks before the two closing panels, the only way to conclude — is that the discussions that began at this conference have not yet concluded. Indeed, these discussions are really only getting started. This was part of the conception of the conference itself: as Haddad noted in his opening comments, the idea from the beginning was that it would really be ...

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Panel Summaries for Day 2 of Jadaliyya's "Teaching the Middle East" Conference

Panel 4: Peripheries and Exceptions The second day of the conference began with a panel that focused on states and issues that have been marginal to the dominant discourses about the Arab uprisings. However, the goal of the panel itself was to highlight the actual centrality of these issues to a deeper understating of these uprisings and their consequences for teaching the Middle East. Asli Bali, in her “Comparative and International Law of the Middle East After the Uprisings: Re-assessing the State of the Arab State,” highlighted the ways in which “law” is exceptionalized in Middle East ...

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Introduction: Teaching the Middle East after the Tunisian and Egyptian Revolutions . . . Beyond Orientalism, Islamophobia, and Neoliberalism

May 13-14, 2011, George Mason University “Teaching the Middle East after the Tunisian and Egyptian Revolutions…Beyond Orientalism, Islamophobia, and Neoliberalism,” a conference sponsored by the Middle East Studies Program and the Ali Vural Ak Center for Global Islamic Studies at George Mason University, and by the Arab Studies Institute (which includes Arab Studies Journal and Jadaliyya), brought together forty participants for an intense two-day conversation regarding the future of pedagogy and scholarship dealing with the region (see List of Participants and Abstracts ...

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Panel Summaries from Day 1 of Jadaliyya's "Teaching the Middle East" Conference

Panel 1: Focus on Egypt The conference panels were kicked off by a panel that used Egypt as a case-study, both in terms of understanding the dynamics of one particular uprising as well as thinking specifically about the pedagogical implications of that uprising on the teaching of Egyptian history and contemporary politics. Joel Beinin, in his presentation entitled "Workers and Egypt’s January 25th Revolution: Shifting the Discussion from Autocracy/Democracy to Political Economy and Equity," argued that a political economy approach is vital to understanding and talking about events ...

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Running on Empty: International Education Funding Gets Deep Cuts

Although education reform is a hallmark of the Obama presidency, we have just witnessed the largest cuts ever to the US Department of Education’s international education programs. In 2009, Obama and his Secretary of Education, Arne Duncan, announced Race to the Top. A $4.3 billion program, it is one of the largest and most expensive education programs in US history. A central goal of Race to the Top is to “prepare students to succeed in college and the workplace and to compete in the global economy.” Apparently, study abroad and foreign language training isn’t deemed essential for such ...

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Schedule from Conference on "Teaching the Middle East After the Tunisian and Egyptian Revolutions."

On May 13 and May 14, more than forty scholars gathered as part of Jadaliyya's first co-sponsored conference on "Teaching the Middle East After the Tunisian and Egyptian Revolutions." The conference announcement and description can be found here. Presenters' abstracts, panel summaries, and more are forthcoming on the Pedagogy Page. FRIDAY, MAY 13 9:30am - 10:00am Introduction by Bassam Haddad and Cemil Aydin, and Welcome by Provost Peter Stearns 10:00am - 11:30pm Panel 1: Focus on Egypt Paul Amar How the Egyptian Revolution Teaches Political Sociology, ...

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Arab Uprisings and Middle East Studies: Roundtable with Beshara Doumani, Charles Hirschkind, Saba Mahmood, and Stefania Pandolfo

This is an audio recording of an informal roundtable on how the recent popular uprisings in the Arab world have impacted research and teaching on the Middle East in the various disciplines.   The roundtable was held on May 2 at the University of California, Berkeley (UCB) as part of the Luncheon Seminar, a monthly gathering of faculty and graduate students at UCB who work on the Middle East and North Africa and Islam-related topics.  This roundtable capped five meetings of the Luncheon Seminar during the Spring 2011 Semester, all of which were focused on the impact of the Arab ...

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"It's Important to Remember Their Names:" Review of Midnight on the Mavi Marmara

Midnight on the Mavi Marmara: The Attack on the Gaza Freedom Flotilla and How it Changed the Course of the Israel/Palestine Conflict. Edited by Moustafa Bayoumi. Chicago: Haymarket Books / New York: OR Books, 2010. First things first: Midnight on the Mavi Marmara is necessary reading. It also provides a strong model for the practice of combining scholarship and activism, and for future endeavors in left publishing more generally. Published as a collaboration between OR Books, a new progressive publishing company specializing in print-on-demand and e-books, and the venerable Haymarket ...

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Jadaliyya Editors

Q&A: edX President Anant Agarwal on MOOCs in the Arab World

by Tadween Editors[The following article was originally published on Tadween Publishing's blog. For ...

Jadaliyya Editors

MOOCs Coming to the Arab World

by Tadween Editors[The following article was originally published on Tadween Publishing's blog. For ...

Jadaliyya Editors

New Texts Out Now: Farha Ghannam, Live and Die Like a Man: Gender Dynamics in Urban Egypt

by Farha Ghannam Farha Ghannam, Live and Die Like a Man: Gender Dynamics in Urban Egypt. Palo Alto: Stanford ...

Jadaliyya Editors

New Texts Out Now: Asef Bayat, Post-Islamism: The Changing Faces of Political Islam

by Asef Bayat Asef Bayat, editor, Post-Islamism: The Changing Faces of Political Islam. New York and Oxford: Oxford ...

Jadaliyya Editors

New JADMAG: Beyond Dominant Narratives on the Western Sahara

by Tadween Editors Beyond Dominant Narratives on the Western Sahara Edited by Samia Errazzouki and Allison L. ...

Jadaliyya Editors

Tadween Roundup: News and Analysis in Publishing and Academia from the Arab World

by Tadween Editors[The following article was originally published on Tadween Publishing's blog. For ...

Jadaliyya Editors

Spotlight: Access to Mideast and Islamic Resources (AMIR)

by Tadween EditorsTadween Publishing interviewed Peter Magierski and Chuck Jones, founders of the blog Access to ...

Jadaliyya Editors

New Texts Out Now: Eliane Raheb, Sleepless Nights

by Eliane RahebEliane Raheb, director. Sleepless Nights [Layali Bala Noom]. Itar Productions, 2012. Jadaliyya (J): ...

Jadaliyya Editors

NEWTON in Focus: Palestine-Israel

by Anthony Alessandrini, Bassam Haddad, and Suzanne Saleeby This week we highlight various NEWTON texts relevant to ...

Jadaliyya Editors

Interview: Sarah Kendzior on Open Access in Academia

by Tadween Editors[The following article was originally published on Tadween Publishing's blog. For ...

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